Standard Temps for 2011 MBP?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by SimonUK5, Mar 5, 2012.

  1. SimonUK5 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2010
    #1
    Probs been asked loads of times but oh well!

    I'm regularly hitting 80C with the MacbookPro just doing simple things like web browsing or Skype, its a Baseline 15'' Late 11 MBP.

    Normal? yay or nay...
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    More than you'd believe! Your Mac is not overheating. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C, GPU Tjmax = 100C on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel) If you're not already using it, iStat Pro will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If they're spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks. The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  3. macdudesir macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2011
    Location:
    Blacksburg, VA
    #3
    yay. I don't have the crazy long paragraphs that GGJStudios has, but i can say that Skype puts high demands on your system because it has to compress the video before sending it through the internet. And if you are viewing websites with a lot of flash on them that can also heat up your computer. Don't fear though, your macbook pro will be fine it has built in protections that will shut the computer down before it does any damage. and thats worse case scenario. 80C is still fairly far away from that point.

    Ah, GGJ beat me to it again! lol :).
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    Blame Typinator! I'm not that fast! :D
     
  5. SimonUK5 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2010
    #5
    Cheers guys! Wasn't overly worried, just seemed a little high. Bumping up the RAM once it arrives,s o i guess that will pop the Heat up aswelll!
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #6
    Not significantly, if at all. In fact, if you've been paging, adding RAM will decrease paging activity, which will reduce system demands and lower temps somewhat.
     
  7. zwodubber macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2011
    Location:
    PA
    #7
    Heavier load with multiple programs running. You can see the main vent and heat dissipation from the GPU. External temps only.


    [​IMG]


    Running fewer programs


    [​IMG]

    Macs get hot, but they will shut down if they overeat. I rarely use mine on my lap. Either on a desk, stand on a desk and some undesirable locations when on job sites but thats what the speck is for :)
     
  8. throAU macrumors 601

    throAU

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    #8
    Apple appears to bias the fans in the MBP towards silence, rather than keeping cool. This means they tend to stay down at 2000 rpm or so for way too long, and wait for the machine to get quite warm before they spin up faster.

    If you get smcfancontrol, you can set the minimum speed of the fans higher, or set a high speed profile to keep the machine cooler, without waiting for the temp to hit 80 degrees (C) and then having the fan kick up to 6500 rpm suddenly in an effort to cool down.
     
  9. shootist macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    #9
    If you sold some to someone and gave them a warranty that covered manufacturing defects and not accidental damage and they brought that item back with a part broken by some fault of theirs, not manufacturing defect, would you fix what they broke for nothing?

    Really own up to what happened and that you did it and to the fact that it is NO longer covered by ANY Warranty.

    If you ran into someone in your car and damaged the front end would you expect the car dealer or manufacturer to fix the damage for nothing.

    That is what you think Apple should do.
     
  10. throAU macrumors 601

    throAU

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
  11. Mr. Retrofire macrumors 601

    Mr. Retrofire

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    www.emiliana.cl/en
    #11
    They do not exist.

    Aluminium is a very good heat conductor. That is the reason why MBPs appear to run hotter. Cover the hottest part of your MBP with a thin (not too thin) piece of plastic and you know what i mean.
     
  12. throAU, Mar 6, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2012

    throAU macrumors 601

    throAU

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    #12

    Yes, however the fact remains, when using the machine as a laptop, i.e., on my lap, I'd rather the fans spin up sooner, so they don't have to work so hard when they spin up later (to 6k). being a good conductor is nice, but not so much if the conducting is into my legs. unfortunately, apple leave ramping the fan up WAY too late, and the machine gets quite warm (still within limits, but not comfortable for portable use) while the fans don't ramp up. i.e, they are trying to be quiet, at the expense of being hotter.

    also, irrespective of temp, i'd prefer the fans to gradually ramp up sooner, rather than waiting at 2000rpm while the machine cooks before screaming up to 6000rpm for a short spike while the machine cools.

    6000rpm is LOUD

    3500rpm as a base is not a lot louder than 2000rpm and makes a large difference in temperature when using the machine on your lap even ramping up to 4500 to cool the machine down sooner under moderate load would be far preferable to the current behavior.

    maybe apple need a preference item: "noise/heat" in the preferences somewhere so users can pick whether silence is more important (i.e., machine is on desk) or temp is more important (i.e., machine is on lap).


    The MBP fan noise is my one complaint with this machine. Apple got pretty much everything else pretty well right imho. The fan noise/heat is a disappointment. None of the PC laptops i have had are so hot in your lap, or so noisy when the fans finally do ramp up.
     

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