Stanford iOS course updated for Swift

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by Loge, Jan 26, 2015.

  1. Loge macrumors 68020

    Loge

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2004
    Location:
    England
    #1
  2. 1458279 Suspended

    1458279

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Location:
    California
    #2
    This is good news, but I'm concerned that from the looks of it, they've dropped ObjC.

    Maybe that's not a bad thing, as a new person might want to skip ObjC, but at the same time, I'm sure there's more jobs in ObjC than Swift because of the legacy code.

    I'm not ObjC's biggest fan, but I also realize that app development isn't just the language alone.

    However, I can't see them teaching both languages at the same time.

    I understand they have close ties with Apple, so maybe this is a good clue of things to come.

    Bout time for me to update my system anyways :D
     
  3. AppSwage macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2015
    #3
    From the lectures he has released they are indeed all in Swift. He doesn't feel there is time to teach both and frankly I think that might be a bit tough on students. I would suggest though that one could go back to his iOS 7 course which is all in Objective C. I would bet, based on his usual course material, that the vast amount of content would be the same as I am thinking iOS 8 specific SDK is not going to makeup a big portion. I would actually suggest that the largest difference will be with sizing classes as they did not exist at all in iOS 7. This will also change the look of the storyboard but autolayout will remain the same. So again I think one could easily get a tremendous amount out of the iOS 7 class as it pertains to relevant Objective C code. Otherwise I think this is a smart move for them to get going with Swift. In lecture 2 he is already covering closures which of course would never had made it into any Objective C format. Great stuff as usual from Paul and Stanford.
     
  4. 1458279 Suspended

    1458279

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Location:
    California
    #4
    I guess the real question for the students will be are they looking for a job or looking to make apps for a small group or solo.

    If you go solo or small group, Swift should have no problems and easier to learn.

    If you want a job, then it depends on if you a working with ObjC code and they want to stick with that and not use a combo of Swift/ObjC in the same app.

    Another upside is that they will be new in a new language. The language is < 1 year old, so they'll have a leg up. This doesn't get into programming or design issues that take years to prefect, but they (we) would have a leg up either way.
     

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