Stars on a Map?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by NStocks, Jan 12, 2011.

  1. NStocks macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Location:
    England
    #1
    Hi,

    First let me apologise if this is the wrong Forum to post this...

    I'm looking for a way to place the stars (like in the sky) on a typical map (ordnance map for example, google maps). Although when you look in the sky you can see stars from all different places of the atmosphere, I want to know if I can see where stars are on a map.

    For example: Stars orbit with the earth, so they must be directly above a certain location i.e Star 123 is 'directly' above england (though it needs to be narrowed down more, into a City)

    I'm also going to post this on a astronomy website.

    Incase your wondering why I want to know this, it's for a University course ( that is not at all related to stars or the galaxy for that matter!)

    Thank You!
     
  2. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Location:
    England
    #3
    Looks fantastic thanks!

    Have you used it before? I'm having trouble trying to pinpoint a location via the Location> Go To Object.
     
  3. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    #4
    After you select an object, IME, you have to "Follow" it. Then you can use the Home key to go to it.
     
  4. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Location:
    England
    #5
    I'm not looking for an object per se, I'm looking at which stars belong to which region in the UK (Lincoln). I've tried inserting coordinates but then it asks for an object which I do not have.

    Thank you
     
  5. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #6
  6. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #7
  7. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Location:
    England
    #8
    I should have probably looked at astronomy a bit more first! I though that if a star is located over the UK for example, it will always be in that position and orbit with the earth...

    Would it be impossible to come up with a generic path which shows the location of stars in certain areas of the world because they apparently change? If so, I will look at philosophy or something to pick a key date etc. (this project is relating to a burial site, so I'm looking for things that people use as 'memorials'.. you can name a star.... This will them provide me with a patter that I can use to create landscaping etc.
     
  8. gangof4 macrumors member

    gangof4

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    Location:
    Texas
    #9
    Astronomy project

    Lincoln, UK sees the same stars as any other place in the world at the same latitude does. It's just that when it's dark in the UK and the stars are visible, they are not visible in the U.S. because the sun hasn't set yet.

    If you believe that the stars and therefore constellations revolve (or rotate or otherwise move on their own) as the Earth does you are making a fundamental error. The constellations you see wherever you live on this planet are the same visible from Mars or Saturn's moon Titan or anywhere else in the solar system. In some sense stars do move of course just as the sun moves through space, but our Big Dipper looks the same as it did 50,000 years ago and will still be recognizable in another 50,000 years (with a small drift of stars perhaps.)

    Now, at different latitudes on earth you see different constellations (such as the Southern Cross which is not visible from the U.S. just as folks in Chile cannot see Polaris.) Also, as the earth reaches certain points in it's orbit around the sun (let's call these points "seasons") you see "winter constellations" increasingly early in the night during the fall. Orion may only be visible at 5:00 a.m. in September but by January it is visible as soon as it gets dark out. In the summer, winter constellations are made invisible by daylight but they are still there of course.

    I may not be understanding your question but I see no value in a map of the earth.
     

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