Static IP Help

Discussion in 'macOS' started by squeezy, Oct 8, 2007.

  1. squeezy macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2006
    #1
    So I'm trying to set up my Mac on a Static IP, the thing is I can't get it to work. I have set everything up on my Mac just as the guides online say. I have tried configuring my router a number of ways, with no luck. I have a Wireless-B Linksys BEFW11S4. Can anyone help? I thought I knew what I was doing, but obviously don't.
     
  2. Arne macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Germany
    #2
    it would help a lot if you posted, what exactly you did and what settings you used on both, your Mac and your Router.
     
  3. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    The Dallas 'burbs
    #3
    Do you have a static IP from your ISP? Or are you just trying to get your Mac, on the backside of the router to have a static IP?

    If the latter you can just leave the router with DHCP running and set the Mac up with a static IP address. However the static IP needs to start with 192.168.x.y. For Linksys the default for x is usually 1 so you end up with 192.168.1.y. Most Linksys routers usually start DHCP assignments at 100 so if you choose y<100 you can usually make sure you don't have IP conflicts on the internal network. Assignments over 100 (have to be less than 255 as well) might have problems on larger networks where you can't guarantee the order of computers booting, although small or single computer networks behind the router shouldn't have that problem very often.

    If you're trying to get a static IP to the outside world you need to get one assigned by your Internet Service provider and you may have to talk to them to see how to get that setup on your router.
     
  4. nownot macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    tx
    #4
    well there is two ways of getting static ip. one is from the router using either mac or a nat table second is network config on the system. the 1st one being better b/c when and if you leave yor network youll get a ip using dhcp. but you can look up your routers info and see if it supports static ip from either mac or somesort of table and im sure there are guides on the 2nd one posted here somewhere.
     
  5. squeezy thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2006
    #5
    Sorry for leaving out so much info, I'm a dumbass.

    I'm trying to get a static IP on my LAN. What I tried was changing my Macs settings under Network / TCP/IP to manually:

    192.168.100 - IP
    255.255.255.0 - Subnet
    192.168.1.1 - Router

    My router was setup to DHCP.

    Trying that setup caused my internet to stop working. I tried resetting both my modem and router, but no luck. When I have it set to DHCP, it has the same exact address, so I don't get it.

    I then tried setting my router to static IP, with the address 192.168.1.100, but I don't know if that was the right thing to do, and it didn't work anyway.

    Hope that helps.
     
  6. nownot macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    tx
    #6
    just hit me. you have to setup your dns servers on your computer. should be able to find the ip's on your router config page. but might possibly be your missing dns info when you set to static.
     
  7. squeezy thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2006
    #7
    Alright, this is from my router, not my modem.

    Internet


    Configuration Type

    Login Type: DHCP
    Internet IP Address: 192.168.254.1
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway: 192.168.254.254
    DNS 1: 192.168.254.254
    DNS 2: 0.0.0.0
    DNS 3: 0.0.0.0
    MTU: 1500

    Is 192.168.254.254 what I need?
     
  8. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    The Dallas 'burbs
    #8
    I think your problem is fairly simple.

    You can set your Mac to use 192.168.1.100 as a static IP address, however you will also need to enter the DNS servers in the box provided. You can usually obtain these addresses from your router, or you can use some other DNS servers available on the net.

    I found a couple listed here

    if you scroll down there are a bunch listed by country....
     
  9. nownot macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    tx
    #9
    dont belive so. should be able to login your router and see two dns server ip's for your internet provider. those are the ones you want to use.
     
  10. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    The Dallas 'burbs
    #10
    Why don't you believe me? I've used other DNS servers from the one provided by my ISP and they have worked fine. I did first mention that he should check his router for the provided addresses since those are going to be the easiest to obtain.

    At any rate I think, we agree in our diagnosis, that the Mac needs the DNS servers specified when assigning a static IP. Without the DNS it cannot resolve any text url into the actual IP address to access.
     
  11. nownot macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    tx
    #11
    sorry that wasnt to you, it was to
    me and you are on the same page.
     
  12. squeezy thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2006
    #12
    Ah! I found them in my modem buried deep in a system log. I put them in, applied, tried a site, and it worked! Thanks for all the help!
     
  13. nownot macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    tx
  14. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    The Dallas 'burbs
    #14
    My bad, looked like you weren't believing that you could have alternate DNS servers when I read it... sorry about that.
     
  15. 4JNA macrumors 68000

    4JNA

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Location:
    looking for trash files
    #15
    another option just for reference since the OP is already on the interwebs...

    you can use the IP of the router for DNS. that is;

    IP: 192.168.1.100
    SUB: 255.255.255.0
    GATEWAY: 192.168.1.1
    DNS: 192.168.1.1

    most current routers work fine this way.
     
  16. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    The Dallas 'burbs
    #16
    I know mine don't and since his is only wireless B I assume his was not "current" enough to handle this nifty trick.
     
  17. nownot macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    tx
    #17
    thats fancy didnt even think about that.
     
  18. mustang_dvs macrumors 6502a

    mustang_dvs

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2003
    Location:
    Durham, NC
    #18
    192.168.100 is not an IP address (IPv4 specifies a xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx address). If you meant 192.168.1.100, setting both the computer and the router IP to the same address is a bad idea, as you have two devices with one address, so nothing will work.

    If 192.168.254.254 is the modem's LAN IP address, then this is right (assuming that your modem is acting as a DNS relay, as well). Either way, you do not want to set your computer's IP to 192.168.254.254 -- it'll conflict with another device.

    I am a bit confused as to why your internal network is set-up to 192.168.1.xxx and your router is connecting to your modem's LAN port on a different IP range (192.168.254.xxx). The 192.168.xxx.xxx and 10.xxx.xxx.xxx ranges will not route outside of their local subnets, especially if your subnet mask is set to 255.255.255.0

    That only works if:
    1. Your router supports DNS relay/caching
    2. Your router is properly configured, with the correct external DNS servers
     
  19. apfhex macrumors 68030

    apfhex

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2006
    Location:
    Northern California
    #19
    I used that method (listing the router's IP as DNS in my Mac's network settings) without problem and without manually entering any DNS servers in the router settings, at least not that I can recall. This was on an old wireless b Linksys. I suggest the OP give it a try.

    Also it may or may not matter, but I would user an IP outside of the range of your routers dynamic addresses (say they're 192.168.1.100–200 or something, so you could use 192.168.1.20 as the static IP).
     

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