still have permission probs after clean install

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by glip, Oct 26, 2011.

  1. glip, Oct 26, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2011

    glip macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2011
    #1
    I have a 2009 mp . Previously I screwed up the permissions by mistakenly adding a 2nd account. I used batchmod and opened them up, but the I guess I didn't do it correctly because many other things didn't work.
    I wiped the startup drive, did the clean install and left the other drives with the photos alone. I went to preferences and retrieved the printer, firefox and mail settings. For the tiff and jpeg images I changed the default program to PS and then found the retched 'custom access' on the tiff & jpeg files. The psd images are fine. All the images are on a separate drive
    I went to repair permissions and there was one unrepairable.

    Warning: SUID file "System/Library/CoreServices/RemoteManagement/ARDAgent.app/Contents/MacOS/ARDAgent" has been modified and will not be repaired.

    Also when I need to do anything that requires the password, my name appears instead of the computer name and putting in the password for either of those computer names works. Is that a problem?

    My question is did I screw it up by changing the default settings for the tiff & jpegs? Do I need to do the clean install again to repair? What about just a reinstall? What about the unrepairable permission?
    I can get around the permissions by doing a "save as" under a different name if I have to.
    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. derbothaus, Oct 26, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2011

    derbothaus macrumors 601

    derbothaus

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    #2
    This is a known log entry on OS X. You can safely ignore it. Depending on the build number there are multiple different apps and files that cause repeated repair failures. Your's is no issue to worry about. I have it too.
    For the rest of it you'll need to push down permissions to the directories asking for password. Change owner, group and everyone appropriately.
    It can get confusing as some Home/Library files require other permissions. Never change root HD permissions unless you know exactly what you are doing. Did you by chance add your user account to the root HD as Owner or anything? Simple fix may be to just push down permissions from your Home directory. Then repair system prefs with Repair Permissions in Disk Utility. Log out and back in. If this is still jacked your going to have to fight inheritance between HD's or use a file server via afp, smb to clean the files and inherit to the account they are being copied into. If they were ACL based it would be much simpler but POSIX can be tough when they do not comply. Make it look like this.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. glip thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2011
    #3
    For the rest of it you'll need to push down permissions to the directories asking for password. Change owner, group and everyone appropriately.
    It can get confusing as some Home/Library files require other permissions. Never change root HD permissions unless you know exactly what you are doing. Did you by chance add your user account to the root HD as Owner or anything? Simple fix may be to just push down permissions from your Home directory. Then repair system prefs with Repair Permissions in Disk Utility. Log out and back in.

    I understand some of what you said. I need newbie English. But as I understand it, I should go to my home file
    push down the circled arrow and hit apply to enclosed, repair permissions, restart and the image files will be fixed?

    When I did the install, all I did was put in my name and give the computer the name mp.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. derbothaus macrumors 601

    derbothaus

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    #4
    Custom access usually means you have an inherited ACL or foreign user permission on the files. Most likely your last account if you changed the name.
    You want to change owner and clean permissions on the directory that is giving you the password dialog if it resides in your User folder then do it there (especially if this is the only directory you are having issues with). If it is on another disk it depends on the format and whether you have Ignore Permissions checked. One safe way would be to copy the folder from external to Home directory somewhere and then change owner and push down permissions and then copy back to external making sure the external is HFS+ and does not ignore permissions. The directory will then be an extension of your home account no password needed. Sometimes cleaning permissions can get frustrating and not all fixes work in all cases.
    Just change all the extra non OS HDD's that have data you need to get to to owner: you, User: You, Staff: Read Only, everyone: Read Only.
    Add your self then go to the Action cog and make owner then press the action cog again and push down. Do this for each offending directory.
     
  5. glip thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2011
    #5
    AAhhh thank you. I went to the offending drive which has the pics (internal, but not startup), changed the ownership from unknown to me. I was afraid to press apply to enclosed folders (as I got into trouble with that earlier)but when I went to a jpg that had an unknown owner, I made a change, saved, and now the ownership changed to me. Don't know why it worked, but it did!

    The other thing that confuses me is that when I go to unlock a file and need a password, my name comes up instead of the mp that is the user name. On my older computer the user name comes up. Not a biggie, but just confusing.

    Thanks so much to you and all who take the time to help.
     

Share This Page