Still password for free apps why?

yalag

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Nov 18, 2007
1,342
55
Still password for free apps why? I thought in iOS6 they said they removed it, but I'm still asked for a password.
 

rKunda

macrumors 65816
Jul 14, 2008
1,240
93
Updates are free, not free purchases. Perhaps it's a way for allowing parents to control what goes on the phone of their kids?
 

elistan

macrumors 6502a
Jun 30, 2007
984
441
Denver/Boulder, CO
Still password for free apps why? I thought in iOS6 they said they removed it, but I'm still asked for a password.
So that somebody can't download apps, even free ones, onto your phone (or a phone you control somehow, like if you're a parent) without prior authorization.
 
So that somebody can't download apps, even free ones, onto your phone (or a phone you control somehow, like if you're a parent) without prior authorization.
Settings->General->Restrictions.

That's what that section should be for!! If I want to be able to download free apps on my phone with no password, I should be able to! Then give parents the ability to enable a passcode for free apps. It's pretty dumb.
 

Duke&tank

macrumors member
Feb 15, 2009
66
0
I notice that if it is an app you downloaded before but don't have it on your phone anymore no password is required as well.

Aaron
 

xnickitynickx

macrumors regular
Mar 13, 2012
229
1
Orlando, FL
For the same reason that was given on the other 13 threads about this...
Free apps need a password for access. That way you control your device.

Only updates and redownloads are password free.
 

Daveoc64

macrumors 601
Jan 16, 2008
4,064
49
Bristol, UK
Updates are free, not free purchases. Perhaps it's a way for allowing parents to control what goes on the phone of their kids?
It can't be that, because there's a parental control option to disable App downloads.

It's just poor design - plain and simple.

There's no reason to require a password when you "buy" a free App.
 

greenchiliman

macrumors 6502
Jul 29, 2010
252
0
Chicago
I would think it has something to do with ensuring there is no unauthorized usage and people downloading unwanted apps on your phone. Thinking of the lowest common denominator, if you dont have an app password and dont have a lock screen pin, someone could load your phone up with a lot of stuff.
 

yalag

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Nov 18, 2007
1,342
55
I would think it has something to do with ensuring there is no unauthorized usage and people downloading unwanted apps on your phone. Thinking of the lowest common denominator, if you dont have an app password and dont have a lock screen pin, someone could load your phone up with a lot of stuff.
and what would the harm in that? It's not like u are paying anything...compare that risk to what i will have to go through every day
 

Daveoc64

macrumors 601
Jan 16, 2008
4,064
49
Bristol, UK
No, that's an opinion, yours. I personally want a password required to install any kind of application.
Why?

What do you lose by not having the password?

To me it seems like an antiquated throwback from a time where everything on the iTunes Store needed to be purchased.

I'd personally love an option to disable it. I'll just count myself lucky that updates don't need the password anymore.
 
Last edited:

AVonGauss

macrumors 6502
Oct 6, 2006
267
37
Boynton Beach, FL
What do you lose by not having the password?

To me it seems like an antiquated throwback from a time where everything on the iTunes Store needed to be purchased.
Just because you have access to my phone, say to make a call or check something online, doesn't mean I am giving you access to modify my phone.
 

The Phazer

macrumors 68030
Oct 31, 2007
2,764
311
London, UK
"Modify" your phone by installing a heavily sandboxed Application?
But one that could potentially call the phone directory, location data, or photos.

Nah, I'm pretty happy with it staying as is. Updates needing them was stupid, but that problem's solved.

I can see the logic of giving people an option though. But the default being the current situation is correct.
 

AVonGauss

macrumors 6502
Oct 6, 2006
267
37
Boynton Beach, FL
I suppose, but why would you trust someone with your phone for ANY purpose if you think they'll do that?
That's an extreme example, there are much more benign examples. By requiring the password to install a new application, you are aware of every single application you are installing (even if you don't know underlying what it is doing).
 

Daveoc64

macrumors 601
Jan 16, 2008
4,064
49
Bristol, UK
That's an extreme example, there are much more benign examples. By requiring the password to install a new application, you are aware of every single application you are installing (even if you don't know underlying what it is doing).
I can understand that.

I still think it should be an option though.