Stolen MacBook Pro, concerned about my personal files?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by murkymudkip, Dec 1, 2013.

  1. murkymudkip macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    #1
    ok, guys. My MacBook Pro was stolen a while ago. I'm over the fact that I lost an expensive piece of equipment, but I'm still worried about my privacy. When it was stolen, it was password protected. On my iPad, I could still see for a couple days that my iCloud tabs on my macbook were still open. Today, I noticed that there are no more iCloud tabs from my macbook.

    What are the chances that my macbook has been reset and all the personal files are gone? I think it was probably reset, especially since I believe the thief didn't know it was my Mac before he/she stole it.

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    The chances of someone cracking or trying to access your data is probably pretty decent. I'm not sure what's on there, but I'd start notifying your credit cards/banks to play it safe.

    All things being equal, its probably a really good idea to encrypt the drive using FileVault, I know that's water over the bridge for you, but when you get a replacement.
     
  3. Mr. Retrofire macrumors 601

    Mr. Retrofire

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    www.emiliana.cl/en
    #3
    @maflynn:
    Encrypted sparse disk image files are enough. :)
     
  4. TheEnthusiast macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2013
    #4
    If it was password protected, it would take a knowledgeable thief to crack it (home folders are hard to access), so my guess is the OS has already been re-installed. The iCloud tabs automatically close themselves, in the event that you are unable to do so or they don't refresh, after a few days. Even if they thief, tried to access files by connecting the HDD to another computer, home folders are still locked. I know, I've tried to do this when my Mac's screen wouldn't turn on and I wanted to access my important files. I couldn't even make modifications using Linux!
     
  5. macfacts macrumors 68000

    macfacts

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Location:
    Cybertron
    #5
    Too late for the original poster but for everyone else, besides the login password for OS X, you should also set the efi firmware password. When this is enabled, a thief can't reinstall OS X or format or boot from DVD.
     

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