Stores and personal info

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by dukebound85, Nov 22, 2014.

  1. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #1
    Surely we have all been asked for our names and address/email/ phone when purchasing items at stores. I usually ask "do you really need that?" and always been told no. Now having been involved in the Target compromise a year ago, I am even more careful about what info stores collect.

    So today I was at Conn's (don't go there....they suck and you thought BB was bad) and was buying a blu ray player as I had a gc there. I paid, they swiped my card and asked for all the usual info, which they stated they needed to have when I asked why. I gave them made up info.

    However, they then wanted my DL number. I asked what does this have to do with making a purchase? They said it was to prevent fraud and whatnot where I explained what if I was 15 making a purchase? or an adult who didn't have one.

    They essentially told me if I didn't give them the info, they would refund my card but not reissue the GC amount. This is absurd so after telling the manager that I thought this was a shi**y policy, I ultimately gave it to them and promptly called their corporate office.

    I do not know why they needed it and why if I refused they would not give me my GC balance back if I failed to give it to them.

    Have any of you ran across these behaviors?

    /rant
     
  2. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    #2
    I never had a store ask for my information! Only online stores wanting my shipping info when ordering online. When a site (Amazon, Overstack or LandsEnd) asks me for a store account I always say no.

    If a traditional store tries that with me I would call their PR phone lines and then Better Business compliant form and never shop there again.

    You did right thing not giving them the information for a some retail merchandise!
     
  3. smithrh macrumors 68020

    smithrh

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    #3
    Walgreen's has started a personal information collection push too... I don't shop there very much any more due to it.

    I've become pretty militant these days - unless *I* can see a reason for someone to have the information, they don't get it. I have left a few purchases sitting on the counter and have walked out. However, what typically happens is that they back down.

    Of course, when they back down, it's a clear sign that they don't really need the information, they just wanted it.

    Keep fighting the good fight...
     
  4. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

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    #4
    The only time I've heard of stores asking for a DL number is when using a personal check, it shouldn't be needed for a CC/GC purchase.
     
  5. smithrh macrumors 68020

    smithrh

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    #5
    Walgreens wanted a scan of my DL for beer.

    Told them they could look at it and verify my birthdate, but not scan it. They said "corporate policy" and I told them "personal policy" and walked out.
     
  6. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #6
    All you can do is refuse and encourage everyone else to do the same. Please do so, or it will not stop.
     
  7. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

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    #7
    Don't get me started! My dad changed his Internet plan the other day and they wanted his DL number. Why? To do a credit check. The new plan is the same price as the old one and he's been a customer since 1999 (and, as far as I know, has never missed a bill payment). Stupidity at its finest.
     
  8. Scepticalscribe, Nov 22, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #8
    Agree completely.

    On principle, I refuse all such requests - it is a commercial transaction, nothing more, and stores have no right to such sensitive information.

    However, that doesn't stop them attempting to obtain it, as such information is extremely valuable to them, particularly for marketing purposes.

     
  9. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #9
    You allowed a store to bully you into giving them information that they didn't need for fraud protection. You shouldn't have given in, which kills your rant.
     
  10. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #10
    Pay cash. Givem Barry Soretoros details. Problem solved.
     
  11. Happybunny, Nov 23, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2014

    Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #11
    I never had that problem of people asking for information.
    I grew up in a city were everybody knew me and my family. There is even a street named after my family, the bank carries our name, at the one time my grandfather was mayor of the city.

    Back then the city only had 48,000 population.

    I was very glad when in the 1980's the population exploded, and most people now don't immediately make the connection in the name.

    Just the other day one of the teachers remarked how strange it was that my granddaughter school had my last name.:p
     
  12. Zxxv macrumors 68040

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    Nov 13, 2011
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    UK
    #12
    email address, sure its ****you@corporate.com

    yes it is are you calling me a liar? whats with you... just input it.

    or just look at them blank when they ask.
     
  13. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    Jul 11, 2003
    #13
    Whenever I am asked for personal information, I simply say, I'd be happy to help you with your direct marketing efforts. To do so, I require a 15% discount. When they say they can't so that, I say, me neither.

    A friend of mine was asked for personal information at PC Richard, a regional electronic chain in the NE. He refused and asked for the manager. The manager was insistent on collecting the information. My friend pulled out his phone and said he was reporting them to Better Get Baquero, a local consumer fraud reported. The manager let the sale go through and several customers applauded him.

    As an aside, remember not to give the cashier **** over it, they're just doing their job.
     
  14. Scepticalscribe, Nov 23, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #14
    Actually, this sort of information is of such worth that stores will sometimes offer discounts to obtain it. I recall one mobile phone company - with which I had an account at the time, and I had called by merely to top up my account - offering approximately $50 credit if one signed up (obviously, by supplying one's email address) to a particular promotion account.

    Anyway, I flatly refused to the bewilderment of the sales assistant who kept bleating 'but you'll get $50 worth of credit - for free'; actually, it was not 'for free' (which was a very attractive carrot), it was an attempt to obtain more data which, in turn, would aid further marketing efforts.

    I take your point about not giving the cashier grief; they are at the coal face where they have to implement these policies and meet the public, and, in essence simply doing their job. Nonetheless, these assumptions which underpin these policies do need to be challenged.

    Moreover, the blurring of boundaries between the public space and the private space is something that has been a matter of concern to me for quite some time. In some ways this is a consequence of the tech and information revolution and the development of online patterns of behaviour, where the simple fact of ordering something from the comfort of your study, or bedroom, can delude you into thinking that boundaries have been preserved when, in fact, sometimes the exact opposite has occurred.

    Indeed, if people fail to safeguard their rights to privacy, their private space, personal space and the ownership of personal information, and fail to draw distinctions between the sort of information other bodies, people and companies can legitimately request, it is something that will cost them over time, as an increasingly loud narrative which argues that 'privacy is dead' is being loudly declaimed by bodies both public (some Governments) and private (some companies).

    This self-serving narrative which tries to persuade us that 'privacy [and the right to retain personal data] is dead' - is a message that is being increasingly reiterated (a little too loudly and assuredly and smugly for my peace of mind) by a perfectly ghastly and rather disturbing combination of public (i.e. Governments intent on obtaining access to personal data) and private (i.e. companies, such as Google, FB among others) bodies all of whom seek such information and seek to establish rights to do so. We fail to challenge and refute this at our peril, and - if, in the interests of access to internet information, we buy the argument that 'privacy is dead' and fail to set appropriate boundaries on what can be legitimately asked of us, rights to personal information which were hard won over centuries may well be eroded cheaply and thoughtlessly.

    Anyway, in practice, this can lead to a presumption of rights to data and information on the part of companies, banks, and utilities. In one instance, a utility demanded my personal state supplied tax/social insurance number and another time a bank demanded my degree transcripts when I merely wished to open an account, and had employer's letter, proof of address and passport to hand to do so - needless to say, all of these requests were refused. However, this is not just a desire to acquire and amass data (very valuable in the information age) but can only have been enabled by the blurring of these boundaries which has been a consequence of the online and tech revolutions which have transformed how we arrange our lives, communicate and interact with agencies, companies and one another.

     
  15. SandboxGeneral Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

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    #15
    I was at a local mall with a friend a number of years ago and we went into a store, of which I don't recall the name, and he bought a shirt, I think, and I just walked around looking, with nothing in mind to purchase.

    As he was being rung up, I stood a few feet away watching. My friend was paying cash, and the cashier asked him for his telephone number and his email address. He blindly, like an ox going to the slaughter, gave the information to her.

    It wasn't but a day or so later that his email account was being blown up with ads, promotions, and other marketing from the store. So much so that he actually took the time to mention it to me that he was so annoyed and regretted giving the information over.

    I've never been asked for a drivers license number, yet, but I have been asked for my email address. I always reply that I don't have one. I'm old enough that it is believable that I might not truly have one. That has always worked so far.

    If I'm asked for DL number, I'll try the 'I don't have one' bit and see how it goes. If they ask how I arrived at their store I'll say either I walked or rode with someone. If they persist, I'll likely leave the item I wanted and walk away.
     
  16. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #16
    I use a http://mailinator.com address I make up on the spot. Free and disposable.
     
  17. Scepticalscribe, Nov 23, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #17
    Yes, it constantly surprises me, firstly, that stores believe that they have a right to request this information when a cash transaction has taken place; cash is its own commodity and means of exchange. Thus, in a commercial transaction, when you are paying with cash, all that matters is that you have sufficient money on you to buy the product that you wish to buy.

    The store has no right to any other information, irrespective of what they may wish to verify.
     
  18. SandboxGeneral Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

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    #18


    At my office, in the business I am in, people will tell us just about anything we ask, and it always amazes me. This willingness to divulge personal information is astounding and its why social engineering works so well.
     
  19. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #19
    We've been trained well. ;) They key is to break ourselves out of it, and it must be a joint effort.
     
  20. Scepticalscribe, Nov 23, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #20
    You and I (many threads and posts ago - I think it may have been the 'reading' thread, and books on the topic were discussed) discussed the topic of introversion and this is one of the areas where I think that introverts may have a natural advantage, as they tend to be somewhat less enthusiastic about volunteering information and a lot more aware of the importance of personal boundaries.

    Oh, agree absolutely.
     
  21. SandboxGeneral Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

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    #21
    Really? We spoke about that? I surely do not recall it, though it does sound like something I would discuss.! :eek:
     
  22. Scepticalscribe, Nov 23, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #22
    On the books thread, I think. Quite some time ago. The topic of books about introverts (which you were reading) came up, and you recommended a few (which I have yet to order, let alone read, but it is a topic that interests me).

    As it is a topic to which I have given some thought, it occurred to me that those who are more inclined to be introverted might feel more reluctant, or less enthusiastic about volunteering such information to agencies, bodies, or companies that have no legitimate need or right to it. I suspect introverts may be better at policing personal boundaries, but that is just a thought.
     
  23. SandboxGeneral Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

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    #23
    Okay, yes, I am starting to vaguely remember this now. I'm quite embarrassed as I usually am quite good at remembering things.

    As a non-scientific thought, I tend to agree with you that more introverted people, such as myself, do, indeed, set, adhere to and at times, make known, our personal boundaries to others around us. I am acutely aware of these things, and divulging sensitive personal information is usually a top priority to protect and avoid doing unless truly necessary.
     
  24. Scepticalscribe, Nov 23, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #24
    Amen to that. To a certain extent, I am probably pretty similar and do not much care for those who seek to trespass such boundaries (without permission) be they companies or individuals.
     
  25. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    Oct 10, 2013
    #25
    You are the grandson of Frans Johan van Lanschot?

    ----------

    Why not givem a random number?

    This is turning into a rather interesting thread. Most sane people don't just hand over personal details. Good to see that the people on here agree.
     

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