Strange happenings on a mac.

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by jumbuck70, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. jumbuck70, Feb 16, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012

    jumbuck70 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Location:
    Bristol UK
    #1
    Hi, Just wonder if anyone can help me solve my puzzle. I have a 2006 macBook Pro, running Snow Leopard latest version, VirusBarrier X6 and MacKeeper. I use Safari as my browser. I powered up the Mac yesterday morning,it took a little longer than usual but when had the Desktop visible I noticed that many more apps had been added to my Dock. Also I had to reset my Email account, and I had a new HomePage???? My first thought was a virus, but I run VB most days,and keep it updated regularly. Any ideas anyone? I will be grateful to know what happened.:confused: Thanks in anticipation.
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #2
    Someone probably logged in to your computer and changed things.
     
  3. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #3
    You don't need any 3rd party antivirus app to keep your Mac malware-free. Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 10 years ago. You cannot infect your Mac simply by visiting a website, unzipping a file, opening an email attachment or joining a network. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which cannot infect your Mac unless you actively install them, and they can be easily avoided with some basic education, common sense and care in what software you install. Also, Mac OS X Snow Leopard and Lion have anti-malware protection built in, further reducing the need for 3rd party antivirus apps.
    Who lives in your home who could have access to your computer?
     
  4. jumbuck70 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Location:
    Bristol UK
    #4
    Strange happenings on a mac.

    Hi, Thanks to all who took the time to reply. I am the only user of my mac, that's what makes it all the more intriguing.
     
  5. iforbes macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
    #5
    The question is does anyone else have access to it? Is it password protected on start-up? Do you have any family/friends/coworkers who like to play tricks? ...or do you live on a remote desert island, by yourself and have your mac with you 24/7/365?
     
  6. jumbuck70 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Location:
    Bristol UK
    #6
    Strange happenings on a mac.

    Hi iforbes, Thanks for your reply--I think. No I do not live on any remote island. Your sarcasm was uncalled for. I live with my wife who hates computers and will never go near one. I repeat I am the only user. If you did not know why these things happened you should have said so.
     
  7. Jagardn macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    #7
    Mackeeper may have done a little "extra maintenance". Did it happen after a recent cleanup?
     
  8. iforbes macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
    #8

    Well, I saw it as a humorous way of pointing out that you didn't answer the question. To each his own. Being the "only user of my mac" does not mean that no one else has access to it. I am the only user of my Mac, but there are easily four other people in my household who have access to it.

    If you would answer the question asked, you might get more and more accurate answers. I do not know why it happened, but was trying to rule out ways that it could.
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    This is a valid point. I highly recommend the OP uninstalls MacKeeper. You don't need "cleaner" or "maintenance" apps to keep your Mac running well, and some of these apps can do more harm than good. Some remove files/folders or unused languages or architectures, which does nothing more than free up some drive space, with the risk of deleting something important in the process.

    These apps will not make your Mac run faster or more efficiently, since having stuff stored on a drive does not impact performance, unless you're running out of drive space. Some of these apps delete caches, which can hurt performance, rather than help it, since more system resources are used and performance suffers while each cache is being rebuilt.

    Many of these tasks should only be done selectively to troubleshoot specific problems, not en masse as routine maintenance.

    Mac OS X does a good job of taking care of itself, without the need for 3rd party software. Among other things, it has its own maintenance scripts that run silently in the background on a daily, weekly and monthly basis, without user intervention.

     

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