Strange iDefrag message..

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by djsound, Mar 15, 2010.

  1. djsound macrumors 6502a

    djsound

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    #1
    Hi there . I have used iDefrag many times and it worked perfectly but now it gets like halfway and says this ...

    "Defragmentation of the disk main has finished.NOTE: Some files were skipped due to lack of contiguous free space and therefore remain fragmented."

    ....anyone know what that means? I googled but cant find anything..
     
  2. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    My guess.. large fragmented files were skipped because there wasn't enough free space to move them around and put them together on the disk. I suggest making some more free space and trying again if you want them defragged.
     
  3. ss957916 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    #3
    I've always read that Macs don't need defragging.
     
  4. diabolic macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    #4
    It means that there wasn't a space big enough for some of the files to fit as one contiguous piece. If the empty space isn't large enough for the entire file, it doesn't move it.
     
  5. Blaine macrumors 6502a

    Blaine

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2007
    Location:
    Abilene TX
    #5
    Yeah, same here :confused:
     
  6. djsound thread starter macrumors 6502a

    djsound

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
  7. diabolic macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    #7
    They don't. OSX automatically optimizes the drive space so it won't need to be defragged. If he is running a drive that is FAT32, then it would need to be defragged.
     
  8. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #8
    They don't, and apple recommends against it, due its hotband of frequently used blocks, they place frequent placed data on the hotband, and defraggers can alter that and actually degrade the performance not improve it.

    That said, all disks can get fragmented to some degree, and OSX has the ability to defrag small files automatically. For some users, (audio and visual) people need their files contiguous otherwise it will impact their work.

    The only other reason for defragging is to compact the free space so you can easily partition the drive for bootcamp.
     
  9. djsound thread starter macrumors 6502a

    djsound

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    #9
    ya I do Audio & Video so...I need to defrag =)
     
  10. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #10
    Mac OS X automatically "defragments" files that are <= 25MB.

    How much free space do you have on the same drive you're trying to defrag?
     
  11. MacManiac76 macrumors 65816

    MacManiac76

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2007
    Location:
    Arizona
    #11
    The files themselves usually don't need defragmenting. However the free space can become very fragmented over time, especially if you download and then delete several large files. This can become apparent when trying to setup a bootcamp partition where you think you have enough space for the partition size but bootcamp setup tells you that you don't. The issue is that there is sometimes not enough contiguous free space to create the partition of said size. So to a certain degree the statement that Macs don't need defragmenting is a myth.
     
  12. applesupergeek macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    #12
    I think the most accurate statement would be they only need very occasional defragmenting.
     
  13. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #13
    Yes, depending on your needs. As I mentioned there are situations where people need their files contiguous otherwise the result of their will be affected. Audio and video are typically needs to ensure nothing impacts the processing.
     

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