Straps - Tightness - Comfortability

franzkfk

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 14, 2011
198
125
Czech Republic
Hi,

we still don't know how much tight the straps must be for the sensors to work perfectly. I have my doubts about the tightness and comfortability. I have worn leather straps and stainless steel straps. Even If I wore them not so tight it was uncomfortable. With leather it was sweating and stainless steel was heavy and got warm easily. Than I bought watch with titanium alloy. They were great - light and no sweating at all (because titanium has good heat conductivity I think). That's my concern. Has somebody thought about that as well?

Luke
 

VFC

macrumors 6502a
Feb 6, 2012
514
10
SE PA.
Personally, I've never had problems with leather watch straps, so not worried.
But I bet you never had a leather strap on a fitness watch. The strap has to be tight enough to keep the sensors close to your wrist and not allow the watch to move around. However, if it's too tight, you will feel discomfort when you bend your wrist.

My FitBit Surge has a stretchy latex material band that flexes considerably when I bend my wrist during exercise. I wonder how Apple will deal with the flex issue for people who are going to take advantage of the fitness aspect of the iWatch.
 

Night Spring

macrumors G5
Jul 17, 2008
13,064
5,084
But I bet you never had a leather strap on a fitness watch. The strap has to be tight enough to keep the sensors close to your wrist and not allow the watch to move around. However, if it's too tight, you will feel discomfort when you bend your wrist.

My FitBit Surge has a stretchy latex material band that flexes considerably when I bend my wrist during exercise. I wonder how Apple will deal with the flex issue for people who are going to take advantage of the fitness aspect of the iWatch.
But Apple has the sports band for fitness use. So if you are using the Apple watch for fitness purposes, just use that. if you prefer a more formal look for regular wear, swap out the band for leather or steel when not excersiisng. I don't see a problem here.
 

franzkfk

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 14, 2011
198
125
Czech Republic
But I bet you never had a leather strap on a fitness watch. The strap has to be tight enough to keep the sensors close to your wrist and not allow the watch to move around. However, if it's too tight, you will feel discomfort when you bend your wrist.

My FitBit Surge has a stretchy latex material band that flexes considerably when I bend my wrist during exercise. I wonder how Apple will deal with the flex issue for people who are going to take advantage of the fitness aspect of the iWatch.
Afraid of this. First time (not the first time - iPhone 2G) to be the early adopter and I bet I will regret it.
 
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VFC

macrumors 6502a
Feb 6, 2012
514
10
SE PA.
But Apple has the sports band for fitness use. So if you are using the Apple watch for fitness purposes, just use that. if you prefer a more formal look for regular wear, swap out the band for leather or steel when not excersiisng. I don't see a problem here.
So you have to switch bands when you want to accurately monitor your heart rate? Maybe Apple will add a 1/2" flex mesh to certain leather/metal bands for dual purpose use.
 

franzkfk

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 14, 2011
198
125
Czech Republic
But Apple has the sports band for fitness use. So if you are using the Apple watch for fitness purposes, just use that. if you prefer a more formal look for regular wear, swap out the band for leather or steel when not excersiisng. I don't see a problem here.

Probably that's why Tim Cook wears SS with white sport band all the time. Well, it is probably for the marketing purpose only (white band is easy to spot). But I'll guess he doesn't want to change bands all the time so sport band is worn all the day.
 

Night Spring

macrumors G5
Jul 17, 2008
13,064
5,084
So you have to switch bands when you want to accurately monitor your heart rate? Maybe Apple will add a 1/2" flex mesh to certain leather/metal bands for dual purpose use.
You change your clothes to excersie, don't you? Just take five seconds more to swap,out your watch band while changing.

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Probably that's why Tim Cook wears SS with white sport band all the time. Well, it is probably for the marketing purpose only (white band is easy to spot). But I'll guess he doesn't want to change bands all the time so sport band is worn all the day.
Wearing the sports band all day certainly sounds like a solution if you like how they feel.
 

franzkfk

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 14, 2011
198
125
Czech Republic
As I said in response to the other poster, what about the sports band? You haven't mentioned that one yet.
VFC told you. It is strange to change those straps all the time you want to do some fitness stuff. And you are doing some exercise during the day all the time and you don't even realize that - catching the bus, even walking from point A to point B is exercise etc. Those metal, leather straps should be comfortable and functional as those rubber bands.
 
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Night Spring

macrumors G5
Jul 17, 2008
13,064
5,084
VFC told you. It is strange to change those straps all the time you want to do some fitness stuff. And you are doing some exercise during the day all the time and you don't even realize that - catching the bus, even walking from point A to point B is exercise etc. Those metal, leather straps should be comfortable and function as those rubber bands.
I've worn leather watch bands while running to catch the bus -- never bothered me. I've never worn link bracelets so have no opinion on that.
 

franzkfk

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 14, 2011
198
125
Czech Republic
I've worn leather watch bands while running to catch the bus -- never bothered me. I've never worn link bracelets so have no opinion on that.
This is just academic talk. We'll have to wait.

By the way ... Does anybody know which size Tim Cook is wearing?
 

Lennyvalentin

macrumors 65816
Apr 25, 2011
1,429
739
I've never worn link bracelets so have no opinion on that.
Metal has lower friction against human skin than leather or rubber. Also, a metal band is heavier with more inertia, meaning the Watch would tend to move more on your wrist, especially during vigorous exercise such as running or such. A lighter, higher friction band would keep the Watch in place better during high movement, potentially allowing the pulse meter to function more accurately.

Also, if you're a dude with arm hair, be aware that steel links can give you a pretty nasty unexpected pinch every now and then when a hair gets trapped between the links as the watch moves. This is the reason I never wear steel bands... :p

The milanese loop is probably better from that perspective; no traditional joints between solid pieces of metal to trap anything in... Well, except oils, dead skin cells and lint fibers from your clothes of course. You'd need to wash that mesh out every now and then to keep it looking shiny, heh.
 

jsmith189

macrumors 68000
Jan 12, 2014
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Also, if you're a dude with arm hair, be aware that steel links can give you a pretty nasty unexpected pinch every now and then when a hair gets trapped between the links as the watch moves. This is the reason I never wear steel bands... :p
My fear exactly. :( It's a struggle.
 

franzkfk

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 14, 2011
198
125
Czech Republic
Well, what were you expecting when you started this thread? Of course it's "academic talk" and we won't know for sure until the watch and bands are released.
It was reaction to your "I've never worn link bracelets so have no opinion on that.". It reminded me a joke but it's hard to translate (sentence "no opinion on that" was vital). Doesn't matter now.

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My fear exactly. :( It's a struggle.
If you don't wear the watch tight it is alright. But that's a problem with Apple watch, it should be tight for the sensors to work correctly.
 

jsmith189

macrumors 68000
Jan 12, 2014
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If you don't wear the watch tight it is alright. But that's a problem with Apple watch, it should be tight for the sensors to work correctly.
Plus I have monster sized wrists anyway, so all bands are tight on me lol.
 

Mr.C

macrumors 601
Apr 3, 2011
4,412
553
London, UK.
Also, if you're a dude with arm hair, be aware that steel links can give you a pretty nasty unexpected pinch every now and then when a hair gets trapped between the links as the watch moves. This is the reason I never wear steel bands... :p.
Same here. It's the same reason I don't wear metal link bands. I stick to leather or plastic bands.