stress test software

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by allupons, Mar 15, 2011.

  1. allupons macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    #1
    I should be getting my brand new 15" macbook pro today, and I was wondering if there was some good mac software for stress testing it. CPU, ram, gpu, disk io, etc would be great if there was an app that rolled all of that together. For whatever reason my google searches haven't gone well thus far. Let me know what you guys use.
     
  2. electronique macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2008
    #2
    Sorry to hijack.. I am also looking for the same.
    But also something similar... An health check app.
    Something that checks RAM and HDD health, any system errors. etc.
     
  3. Exana macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    #3
    Try xBench 1.3 or Cinebench R11.5 (better) or use Bootcamp with Windows 7 to run Prime95, FurMark 3D Mark and so on.
     
  4. 2Turbo macrumors 6502

    2Turbo

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2011
    #4
    Is it best to stress test under OS X, or Windows 7? With my PC's I use programs like MemTest, IntelBurnTest, & HDTune. Is there any advantage to stress testing in OS X or does it not really matter?
     
  5. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #5
    There's no need to "stress test" your Mac. Just use it as you normally would. If anything fails, that's what the warranty is for.
     
  6. allupons thread starter macrumors member

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    Mar 11, 2010
    #6
    It is mostly for the purpose of testing temps and fan speeds as many have complained and I am curious for myself.
     
  7. Detrius macrumors 68000

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    Sep 10, 2008
    Location:
    Asheville, NC
    #7
    As an Apple tech, I support this message. We're not talking about home-built machines with questionable parts that came from various vendors with uncertain compatibility.
     
  8. GGJstudios, Mar 15, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2015
  9. tresnotas macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    #9
    I liked CineBench for CPU and GPU. It was able to max out all 8 cores and sort of assured me that the my MBP works fine even under stress. You can also observe your max temperatures, and how your fans behave.
     
  10. 2Turbo macrumors 6502

    2Turbo

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2011
    #10
    Well I can understand not needing to stress test the cpu and gpu, but I like to test the RAM and HDD extensively cause I want to weed out problems before I put my data on the system and rely on it for work.
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #11
    A RAM failure would not cause you to lose data, unless you were working on something at the time of the failure. You can use Disk Utility to verify a disk and its permissions. There's no need for any kind of "stress test" for either.
     
  12. iZero, Mar 15, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2011

    iZero macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    #12
    Like has already been posted, the best way to test it, is to use it as you normally would. It's getting pretty sad lately, like it does every time a refresh hits (despite some wanting to remember differently than reality, this happened in 2008, 2009, 2010... ).

    If you use software or conditions to purposefully max out your machine, it's going to warm up fast. That isn't a representation of how it will run in normal circumstances. Some of these posts, have been wildly misleading to new users. Even to the point that some new to Macs, are wanting to open their machines, immediately voiding their warranty (big trouble if they end up actually having problems..), to play with things they ought not bother. In another thread, myself, and another user tested our 2010 and 2011 MacBook Pro's, side by side. My 2010, is a maxed out 17 inch, and my 2011 is also maxed out for it's production run too. (both minus SSD's) Under every condition, stressing it to the limits, or idling/doing light work, side by side, they are virtually identical in temperature. I believe mine was a 4-5 degree variance at the very most. Under every condition. The other user, tested his equally comparable 2010 and 2011 15 inch machines, with similar results. Both within a few degrees of each other also. Thus far, no one has tested (or posted about it) a 2010 and 2011 13 inch, of equal option level to each other, so they may indeed be problematic for 2011, or they may just be that much more common so more people are posting about them.

    Nearly identical operating temps under every condition, with the 2011 in both our cases being much faster than their 2010 counterpart. And in our cases at least, we can prove it, undeniably.

    At any rate, use it how you'll normally use it, and it will give you a good representation of what it will run at for you. If anything goes wrong, you're covered 100% by Apple :) If you feel it's too warm, just take it in! They are there to help, and answer questions. Just don't let people scare you. Some try pretty hard come refresh time every year. When I got my 2010 iMac I let people's nonsensical posts about them, terrify me into nearly returning it. Someone posted actually useful info, and I just let it go for a week, and realized it was perfectly fine. But also, there are some threads with real concerns, and repairs/replacements having been done by Apple, and if you develop real issues, do have Apple look at it immediately!

    Edit: I should also add, I don't mean that every post regarding heat is false or trying to scare users. But some, are, and new users need to be aware that not every one of these things is a nuke waiting to melt the world :)
     
  13. 2Turbo macrumors 6502

    2Turbo

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2011
    #13
    Even though RAM won't lose my data, I'd rather verify a problem right off the bat by runing MemTest. With HDD's I like running a speed benchmark, and full sector error test.
     
  14. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #14
    I understand the obsession with tests, coming from a Windows experience. While you can run all the tests you want on your Mac, they're completely unnecessary.
     
  15. 2Turbo macrumors 6502

    2Turbo

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    Feb 18, 2011
    #15
    Even HDD and RAM tests? :rolleyes:
     
  16. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #16
    Yes, even HDD and RAM tests. :rolleyes:
     

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