Stuck with i5 Retina 5k iMac

Discussion in 'iMac' started by swamyg1, Feb 1, 2016.

  1. swamyg1, Feb 1, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2016

    swamyg1 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    #1
    So I bought a new i5 iMac with fusion drive for an employee thinking it would have sufficient performance. I upgraded the ram to 24gb.

    She was let go about a week ago and I've been using the machine myself since, its underpowered for our creative needs and it's clear to me that I should have gotten the i7 chip with SSD now.

    Is my only option to sell the machine and buy a new one with the specs I need? If so, what would be the best venue to sell a 2 month old Retina 5k iMac? Craigsist, eBay?
     
  2. Malus120, Feb 2, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2016

    Malus120 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2002
    #2
    You've left out three key pieces of information needed to give you a proper answer.

    1. When and where you bought the iMac
    If you bought it from Apple in the United States they have a 14 day no questions asked return policy from the day you received it as long as you kept the box and everything else that came with it (see the link below)
    http://www.apple.com/shop/help/returns_refund

    If you bought it somewhere else, check their return policy. Many big box electronics retailers like Best Buy have 15-30 day return policies with no penalty even for open items (again assuming you have everything and its still in good condition)

    Assuming not a lot of time has passed, just return it if you can.

    2. Exactly what model you bought (please include detailed specs) ?

    From what you've said I'm going to assume you bought the stock mid range model with the 3.2Ghz i5, 1TB "Fusion drive", and M390 GPU.

    3. In what way exactly is the machine "underpowered for your creative needs."

    Depending on what you mean, you may not be best served by just rushing out to buy another RiMac. What kind of applications are you running? In what way is the performance inadequate and by how much? While it doesn't sound like its a ram problem, from the scant description you provided it could be anything from the CPU, GPU, or storage system to just plain old poorly optimized software.

    For example, if the CPU/GPU is the problem, even BTOing the 4Ghz CPU/M395X GPU from Apple only gets you so much more performance. If its really THAT inadequate you may need to be looking at something like a Mac Pro (although I'd recommend waiting for the next refresh).

    If on the other hand all you really need is an SSD boot drive/ more SSD storage, a USB 3 or Thunderbolt attached SSD should work just fine (assuming you don't need the PCIe speeds of the Apple SSD).

    Of course, if you're software is just poorly optimized then its going to be (relatively) slow no matter how much hardware you throw at it, so in that case I'd advise evaluating other software options.

    If for some reason you absolutely MUST sell it, I'd advise that you first attempt to sell to someone you actually know, or perhaps another business in the area. You may need to offer them a bit of a discount to sweeten the deal, but its you'll save a lot of hassle vs trying to sell something that large on Craigslist, and a lot of money compared to selling on eBay with their ridiculous fees. If that's not an option, well I'd recommend just paying the eBay tax and getting it over with ASAP vs getting jerked around on CL.
     
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #3
    What machine did you buy? The M385 with 1TB fusion drive, the M935?
    What software are you using?


    See the OP's post, his machine is far out of the return window.

    OP, if you are looking to sell the computer, then yes, craigslist will give you the best return for your money, eBay will sell it faster but you'll have to deal with fees and possible scammers.

    Is there any other purpose you can use the computer for?
     
  4. swamyg1 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    #4
    Thanks for the response guys! I should have included more info. I have the base model with the M390 chip, I purchased it directly from the business channel.

    I could just keep it for our next designer, instead of taking a hit and selling it. I figure I'd probably lose 10 to 15%? They will probably be able to manage with it, unless they get more into video.

    I was hoping to keep it for myself but I am used to a 6 core hackintosh. I use a lot of graphics and video programs, and I find the machine sluggish at times.

    I previously had 8 core Mac Pro trashcan but returned it do to a hardware fault. It did not perform like my hackintosh and I just couldn't justify the value.

    I'm thinking of building another hackintosh for myself. I can save thousands and meet my performs expectations easily, the 5820k chip is what I'm looking at.
     
  5. bent christian Suspended

    bent christian

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2015
    #5
    For high-demand production needs, go with a system that can be upgraded. Mac are convenient, they are easy, but they aren't the best machines available for professional production work. Take the hit, sell the Mac, build your own upgradable machine. You will still come out ahead in the end.
     
  6. robgendreau macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    #6
    I agree with bent; get a PC and build your own.

    What you lose is the 5k screen, but even then you could buy a 5k monitor, just way pricey and harder to configure. And I prefer the Mac OS use of retina over Windows by far, but sorta depends on the software you run. Someone plowing away in Avid or something all day probably won't care...or you won't care.

    Just keep it to known hackintosh-compatible parts in case you ever wanna run the Mac OS on it.
     
  7. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #7
    I can't speak for the OP, but most business owners and managers tend not to want to build their own computers. Its generally a poor business decision as they'll not have any support avenue (other then themselves). A Dell or Lenovo would be a better choice. People don't have the time to do their jobs and build/support PCs, its just not feasible imo.
     
  8. bent christian Suspended

    bent christian

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2015
    #8
    I will refer you back to post #4..
    http://forums.macrumors.com/threads/stuck-with-i5-retina-5k-imac.1954083/#post-22529089

    The OP 'is used to working on a 6core hackintosh'. This is someone who has already been down that road and didn't appear to have a problem with it.
     
  9. MistrSynistr macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 15, 2014
    #9
    What are you doing on this computer? I have a 2013 iMac i5 3.2 without an SSD and I do HUGE Photography files, editing, Graphic Design, all Adobe's, etc with absolutely no problems...?
     
  10. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #10
    You're right, I missed that.

    Still, I stand by my assessment that a building a PC in a business setting is a risky and poor choice. If the OP, feels comfortable with it, then its his time, not mine :)
     
  11. Catholic13 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    #11
    Why do you need so much ram? wouldn't 16 have been enough? are you running that many apps? o.o
    That aside....craigslist is your best bet- but people will try to "low ball"you so list it for more than you want- it'll make them feel like they have some power... eBay will charge you...I think they take about 20% of sale value...then you have shipping to deal with...etc.
     

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