Stupid Home Depot

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by nhamp07, Oct 20, 2014.

  1. nhamp07 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2011
    #1
    Capital One sent me a letter a week or so ago saying they are sending me new cards because I shopped at HD.

    I cant set up apple pay on my primary card that we use always until my new ones come in bc I have already been assigned new account numbers, but the cards are not activated yet.
     
  2. 12vElectronics macrumors 68040

    12vElectronics

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2013
    Location:
    California
    #2
    Doesn't it take like 3 days to get new cards? You've lived you're whole life without Apple Pay. You can survive a few more days.
     
  3. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    #3
    Agreed. I'd rather wait a few days for new cards than deal with the aftermath of someone stealing from me.
     
  4. nikhsub1 macrumors 68010

    nikhsub1

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Location:
    mmmm... jessica.'s beer...
    #4
    Capital One fail. Chase, walk into any branch and walk out with a new card in 5 mins. Win.
     
  5. nhamp07 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2011
    #5
    reply

    yes, I know. Stupid timing really.

    Called them and they said it was mailed on the 13th. So any day now. Not that big of a deal.
     
  6. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    At the iPhone hacks section.
    #6
    And chase branches are everywhere?
    Not any closer than 4 hours away
    from me
     
  7. bhags8 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2012
  8. Oridus macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2012
    #8
    Chase has a little more than 5,000 branches in the USA. Only about half of those offer cards on the spot. On top of that (correct me if i'm wrong), it's only for Chase debit cards. Credit cards still have to be mailed.

    Judging from this map, this is far from accessible for most people :D

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chase_(bank)#mediaviewer/File:JPMorgan_Chase_footprint_2010-03.png
     
  9. nikhsub1 macrumors 68010

    nikhsub1

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Location:
    mmmm... jessica.'s beer...
    #9
    Yep. Here in LA there most be fortygabillion.
     
  10. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2013
    #10
    It would be good to look at the bigger picture.

    I would like to see Apple's system thrive, because it is more secure than the current system (not a big hurdle), and because it will forever prevent the wireless carriers' ability to profit from or have any control over our transactions.

    Apple's timing to introduce it's Apple Pay system is perfect. Our point-of-sale payment system is terribly insecure, as we have seen from the breaches of the Target, Home Depot and Kmart systems. There is no way that our ID and credit/debit card information can be maintained securely in these large, interconnected data systems.

    The real advantages of the Apple Pay system are the security features, Apple's scale and marketing clout, and its reputation.

    The security is accomplished by the creation of tokenized payment information packets that are transmitted through the system, instead of the customer's ID and credit/debit card info. You need 2 factors to authenticate the payment - something you have (the device) and either something you know (PIN #) or something that is specific to you (fingerprint).

    Getting consumers and merchants to adopt this is important. Other systems have failed. Google, to its credit, tried to do this with it's Google Wallet system. This failed to gain widespread adoption for a number of reasons, among which are the lack of hardware standardization and Google's inability to counter the wireless carrier's egregious tactics. It has been widely reported that Verizon, using its near-monopoly status (and presumably the other carriers), effectively blocked the NFC portion of the Google Wallet system, for self-serving reasons - it wanted to promote its own competing system. Verizon was a partner with a few banks in the unfortunately-named ISIS system, later rebranded as "Softcard" after the name ISIS became toxic. It was doomed to failure, requiring a costly and bulky hardware add-on to smartphones, and adding costs to the payment system. Why on earth would Verizon feel justified to milk fees for customers' purchases? Where is the value added? Plus, who would trust Verizon with his bank or credit card account information? I would not let Verizon, with its sordid anti-customer reputation, anywhere near my bank or credit card information.

    Enter Apple. Apple is wisely partnering with established banks, and it has the market clout to thwart Verizon's (and the other carriers') tactics. Apple can simply tell the carriers that it will jolly well put an NFC-based payment system in its iPhones. Period. Verizon told Google, "No, you can't put NFC capability in your phones if you want them on our system." Verizon can't do that to Apple, and Apple has tight control over its hardware and software. Apple has done this type of thing before. An example is the lack of carrier bloatware on its phones -- Apple simply would not allow Verizon's (or ATT's, or Sprint's) bloatware. Another example - Apple's iMessage feature has almost completely eliminated the carriers' ability to make outrageous charges for SMS text messages. Just the thought of this makes me livid - why should the carriers have control over features that the hardware manufacturers place in the phones?

    Go, Apple. I'm going to use the system and will encourage merchants to adopt it. My bank's credit card (USAA) will join this system on Nov 8th, and I'm happy to wait.
     
  11. Ladybug macrumors 65816

    Ladybug

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    #11
    OP..you might want to check with your Capital One. Over here we can walk in and get a new card the same day. They cut the cards and let you pick your pin. You walk out with a new card in 15 mins.
     
  12. dontwalkhand macrumors 601

    dontwalkhand

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #12
    The good news is that Home Depot supports contact less payments so you can use Apple Pay there now after its setup.
     
  13. Gincoma macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    #13
    Its a temporary Visa card and when you get the permanent card in the mail the 3 digit code on back is different so therefore you can't even store the temp card permanently either...your point is invalid also....I work at Wells Fargo and offer the same temp cards as Chase or any other major bank
     
  14. Newtons Apple Suspended

    Newtons Apple

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
  15. Hal~9000 macrumors 68000

    Hal~9000

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2014
    #15
    Better educate yourself more about your industry then...

    Depending on the branch you can walk into a Chase > ask for a personal banker > say you lost your card and need a new one > set up the new card and pin right there (I've done this twice before).

    No "temporary visa / card in the mail" stuff like you are talking about.
     
  16. Gincoma macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    #16
    Haha Chase doesnt imprint your name on the card in the branch, so therefore when you come in and say you lost your card they will issue you a permanent card on the system sometimes giving you a temp card to get you by until the perm card shows up. edumacate yo self
     
  17. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #17
    There is also the 100% safe solution, use cash.

    Ok why would you use a bank that doesn't have any branches local?
     
  18. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2013
    #18
    Cash?? What's that? :)

    I'm very happy using my bank (USAA) with no branches at all, much less local branches. Great customer service, no fees, no minimum balance, deposit checks using scanner or smartphone, great billpay service ... the list goes on. If I need that old relic of the past (cash), I can go to any ATM and the fee is rebated to my checking account. "Compromised" credit cards are replaced with a phone call and sent overnight or 2-day UPS. Can't say enough good things about USAA.

    Seriously, the only reason I can think of to use a local bricks-and-mortar bank is to get a bank officer's signature guarantee to do something exotic such as sign a form to transfer assets in a qualified retirement plan to a Rollover IRA. Can't think of another reason that I need. Maybe buy a US Savings Bond? Seriously??

    Local bank branches are so yesterday!.
     
  19. Happybunny macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    #19
    Absolutely like in "Breaking Bad" it's cash only.:p
     
  20. dontwalkhand macrumors 601

    dontwalkhand

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #20
    I have USAA and having no ability to deposit cash is horrendous. And they want me to Western Union my deposits?? Or worse use another bank account to deposit into another bank account?

    I'll only now use them for my credit card.

    ----------

    For the absent minded cash is the worst idea. Especially with change. Now full $20s is fine but add $1s and $5s etc.
     
  21. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2013
    #21
    Good point; I forgot about those who need to deposit cash.

    I would argue that using "another" (local) bank simply to deposit cash to transfer to USAA bank is a viable option. Why? Security, good service, simplicity.

    Explanation: I'm retired, so it's important to keep track of spending. This is easy to do if you funnel ALL of your spending through one account - paying all bills and making payments through one account means that you can monitor spending 24/7 by simply looking at that one account. And that institution needs to be trustworthy (customer-friendly) because your bank account will be linked to investment accounts for transfer transactions.

    Security is critical. We are in a period of turmoil in the security arena. I was an identity theft victim a while back; someone used my ID (name, SSN, birthdate, address -- apparently obtained from one of the now-famous data breaches) to open a brokerage account in NY and began trading foreign currency derivatives. Long story short, USAA helped me detect this and was helpful in resolving this and instructing me in preventing future problems (security freezes, etc.).

    These days, you really need trusted, consumer-friendly institutions to handle your financial transactions, especially when transferring funds from one institution to another. My votes go to USAA (banking) and Vanguard (investments). I'm thinking that Apple's payment system will offer good security - certainly better than the current magnetic swipe credit/debit cards.

    So that's why I say it is worthwhile to have another small-balance local account, if you need one, so that USAA can be your "main" transaction account.
     
  22. malman89 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    May 29, 2011
    Location:
    Michigan
    #22
    So does Fifth/Third for certain accounts (definitely not the online only/most basic account). My buddy lost his primary card and didn't care at all - got it sent overnight for the next day.

    There's definitely some perks to brick and mortar banks over online. I use Chase for my checking and credit cards, but I only use online banks for my savings accounts, as they offer much better interest rates (which are still terrible, but it's something).
     
  23. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #23
    Stop your silly face with that logic! There is no place for reasonable responses here!


    OP: If it wasn't HD, it could be any other major retailer. Hackers hack, it is what they do.
     
  24. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2013
    #24
    Yes, good point. We need to change our payments system in a fundamental way to try to stay ahead of the hackers. It's pretty obvious that all of the systems are going to get hacked. Now we need to change the systems to neutralize the data being hacked.

    It appears to me that Apple's system is pretty good, using "tokens" instead of actual customer ID and credit card numbers to transmit through the system. Plus there's the fingerprint ID feature to add security. These features are not unique to Apple, but Apple has the marketing clout and the trustworthy reputation to achieve a critical mass and eventually succeed in the marketplace.
     
  25. 12vElectronics macrumors 68040

    12vElectronics

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2013
    Location:
    California
    #25
    :p:p Where is the hug smiley when you need one
     

Share This Page