stupid question should i install windows if i already have a dedicated machine

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by Acorn, Mar 9, 2009.

  1. Acorn macrumors 68020

    Acorn

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Location:
    macrumors
    #1
    I have been thinking about installing windows on my macbook but i already have a dedicated windows laptop for gaming. Would I be wasting my time doing this. It just feels sort of wasteful to have a gforce 9400 but not use it in any way.

    Whats worse is I have no windows specific software. The primary software I am using is Rosetta Stone which works on both.
     
  2. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #2
    Not sure why you would want to... esp. if you have a dedicated machine

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  3. Acorn thread starter macrumors 68020

    Acorn

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Location:
    macrumors
    #3
    i know right. every day I pull out a windows disk and go im gonna install it then go..but why.
     
  4. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    #4
    Just put the disc down and nothing can get hurt.

    Like you said, there is no reason to do it.
     
  5. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    Location:
    Yay Area, CA
    #5
    If you have a dedicated machine, I'd say maybe install a small XP in a virtual machine on the mac, so for those rare moments where you need windows, its available.
     
  6. Winni macrumors 68030

    Winni

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Location:
    Germany.
    #6
    You've already wasted your time posting this question in this forum. In the time it took you to collect and read the answers, you could have installed Windows on that machine and seen for yourself whether it was worth it. ;-)

    Right in this very moment, I'm using my Vista 64 Boot Camp installation on my Mac, but sometimes I also don't know why I have it.

    Then, when I look at it from my job perspective, I'm asking myself why I have a Mac.

    The world where I make my money consists of Windows Servers and a few Unix(-like) boxes that do -not- have an Apple on them and that do -not- run OS X. Apple simply is a no-show in -my- professional world.

    I've got to know a whole new platform in the few years since I'm using Macs in my private life, but it had little to almost zero impact on my career and professional life. Maybe it even was a waste of time and money to go down the Mac route in the first place: The world uses Windows, and I also don't feel special anymore when I use a computer (read: a Mac running OS X) that's most of the time not really compatible with the rest of the world. It's more annoying than it is fun.

    Or to put it that way: You have a luxury problem and probably no real need for either machine, otherwise you wouldn't be thinking about what software to run on what machine. Both platforms are sufficient for casual web surfing, but only one is good for playing games and in almost all cases only one is good for professional/business needs.

    I've yet to meet somebody who can truly exclusively and every day use ONLY OS X and software for OS X. Sooner or later, everybody either boots into Windows or fires up a VM with Windows. That says a lot about the position of Windows in this world and it also says a lot about the shortcomings of the Apple platform.
     
  7. bradenwh macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2008
    #7
    Macs aren't supposed to make you feel "special." It's not a status symbol.
    It's a computer. A machine.
    It won't cure cancer or make you a better person. You buy a Mac because you want a Mac.

    If you use electronics to make you feel "special," then you shouldn't have electronics at all.

    Oh, and you say that no one can use only OS X and software for OS X. You also say that that fact "says a lot about the shortcomings of the Apple platform."
    The only time I open up a Windows virtual machine, is to use a program that OS X will not run. How does that reveal the shortcomings of the Apple platform? How is it Apple's fault that software designers don't push out an OS X version of their program? It isn't Apple's job to hunt down developers, making sure that they're developing for OS X. It has nothing to do with Apple. It's simply the neglect of the developers.
    That fact reveals nothing about the shortcomings of the Apple platform.
     

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