Successful CPU upgrade

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by thestickman, Jun 6, 2016.

  1. thestickman macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2010
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    #1
    Upgraded my 2009 Mac Pro from 2.26 to 2.93 CPU's. These were lidded processors I got new for cheap. I installed them one at a time & made sure to only make quarter turn adjustments till all the RAM showed & the red light on the CPU tray went out.

    Granted, a pair of 6 cores would be better but this is what the wallet could pay for now. Hopefully in a few months I will find a pair of 3.33 6 core. Or I might just stick with what I have.

    Peace :)
     
  2. 666sheep macrumors 68040

    666sheep

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Location:
    Poland
    #2
    Anything is better than 2.26s. Experience gained is worth something as well.
     
  3. MultiFinder17 macrumors 68000

    MultiFinder17

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    Tampa, Florida
    #3
    Grats mate! I upgraded my 2010 from a quad 2.8 to a hex 3.2 a little while ago, and what a difference it makes!
     
  4. cageytiger macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    #4
    Are there no downsides in keeping them lidded? I was under the impression they had to be delidded?
     
  5. h9826790 macrumors 604

    h9826790

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #5
    The downside is possible damage the 2009 4,1 CPU tray socket during the installation process.
     
  6. mattspace macrumors 6502

    mattspace

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Australia
    #6
    something I've not seen mentioned here that i discovered in my upgrade to delidded processors, is that at least one of my heatsink bolts was VERY tight for the entire loosen / tighten sequence. All of the bolts had blue plastic debris on their threads when I looked at them. I had the service manual, and loosened / tightened them in the stated order, nipping them in order by about 1/4 turn 3 or so times for the last bit, each nip enabling a bit more on each of the others. But that one tight bolt required the same effort or the entire tightening process - it gave no indication in resistance of being "done up", so to speak.

    Frankly, it terrified me to think what I would have been going through knowing I had the potential to crush the processor sockets as a part of the exercise, if I'd been using lidded processors.
     
  7. stjames70 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2009
    #7

    The blue debris is LocTite Threadlocker 242. It is used during assembly to prevent the screws from unwinding. I would have used it again, except I used lidded processors just like the OP and had to make small adjustments to both the x5670 processors when I replaced mine.
     
  8. mattspace macrumors 6502

    mattspace

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Australia
    #8
    ahh, good to know, i just assumed the thread went through a plastic sleeve at some point, and bit into it.
     
  9. thestickman thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2010
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    #9
    If you aren't careful you can damage the CPU socket. I avoided this by tightening the screws in small increments. I did one CPU at a time I took my time to assure each CPU was tightened enough to work. When all the RAM assigned to the CPU showed up in OS X I knew it was time to move to the next one.
     
  10. whartung macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2014
    #10
    The 3.46 quad cores are the hidden gems for our computers. Only 8 cores, but for anyone who doesn't specifically need 12, the 3.46 get the fastest clock speeds available for our computers as well as support for 1333 ram, and they are a lot cheaper than most of the 12 cores I've been able to find.
     
  11. daavYo macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 29, 2016
    #11
    great !
    i updated 2 MacPro 1.1
    first with Xeon X5365 3Ghz
    second with Xeon X 5355
    they re both ok :)
     

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