Summary: Get a MBP to solely run windows?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by archdelux, Apr 11, 2010.

  1. archdelux macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    #1
    I am leaning towards getting a 13" MBP when they come out (hopefully this tuesday) with the plan to solely (or mostly) run windows 7.

    I understand that there have been a number of issues in the past including keyboard backlight constantly on, sensitive trackpad, battery life issues, etc.

    It seems that a lot of these issues have been resolved via driver updates--is this the case? Has the trackpad issue been resolved? Overall, would you recommend getting a MBP to run windows?
     
  2. Rodus macrumors 6502a

    Rodus

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    Oct 25, 2008
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    Midlands, UK
    #2
    Seriously? Why? A chunk of the price you pay is for OS X and iLife. Just buy a PC.
     
  3. clientsiman macrumors 6502

    clientsiman

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    #3
    Just buy a PC.
    Apple's drivers for windows suck and it always be like that, so if you want only windows don't buy a macbook.
     
  4. TJRiver macrumors 6502

    TJRiver

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2009
    #4
    Save your $ and buy a windoze machine. Why be a Mac poser?:rolleyes:
     
  5. NoSmokingBandit macrumors 68000

    NoSmokingBandit

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2008
    #5
    ^^way to keep it mature...


    I'd suggest going for one of the Sony i3/5 machines. Theres a few threads about Sony's new line up and everyone seems pretty impressed with them. You'll likely get better performance for less money.
     
  6. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

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    Location:
    New England
    #6
    While my late '09 MBP is still my favorite all around box under both OSes, I am currently awaiting delivery of a 13" Dell Vostro 3300 i5-520M box for work. It was still over $1K, so I'm still not seeing the huge "Mac Tax" some of the other posters are referring to, and would have bought another Mac if I wanted to run OS x/iLife on it (and the i3/i5/i7 MacBook Pros were out.)

    B
     
  7. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #7
    If you're just going to use Windows the drastically reduced battery life alone should be reason enough not to get a MBP.
     
  8. archdelux thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    #8
    thanks for the input. It seems that I can't rely on Windows drivers to be reliable and thus can't rely on using bootcamp with MBP.

    What do you think about running VM Fusion or Parallels natively so that I can access and use windows as well as Mac features and programs? Is this a sound idea in terms of buying a MBP for that intent? Does it slow down the computer (such that I would be paying significantly more for a computer that effectively runs slower/etc due to running both OSs)?

    Thanks for the input
     
  9. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

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    #9
    Is that really the case? When I talk about the reduced battery life it is in comparison to the battery life under OS X. If I compare to another similarly specced PC like my wife's ThinkPad, the battery life seems about on par.

    So shouldn't it be that the drastically enhanced battery life under OS X shoudl be reason enough to run OS X on your Mac?

    B
     
  10. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #10
    Of course.. no laptop on the planet won't take a performance hit when running multiple OSs simultaneously.

    You need to identify WHY you want a Mac, IF you're willing to make the effort the change your computing behavior (Mac OS X =! Windows), HOW OFTEN you're going to run Windows.

    Running Mac OS X and Windows 7 simultaneously is great and doable and functional etc.. but if you find that you're going to be doing more then 65% of your work in Windows, then there's no point in spending more money on a Mac. Windows should really only be for applications that you simply cannot run in Mac OS X, otherwise, why use a Mac at all?
     
  11. cobalt79 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    #11
    I am interested in doing this as well -- but more so to take advantage of certain Mac software. However, I foresee myself using Windows 7 a great deal of the time.

    Is there a consensus list of issues out there?
     
  12. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #12
    Right, but your similarily specced PC probably doesn't cost as much. Why pay more for the same thing?

    No, but I don't use OS X because I get better battery life on my machine with it. To each their own, though.
     
  13. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    Location:
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    #13
    Get as much RAM and processor as you can. EVerything will be fine, provided you're not trying to run insanely 3d intensive apps like AutoCAD or anything.
     
  14. cobalt79 macrumors member

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    Feb 18, 2010
    #14
    Photoshop? Civ 4?
     
  15. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    Location:
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    #15
    I'd prefer Photoshop in Mac OS X. But Civ4? Heh, not a challenge. I can run "Dawn Of War II" in Parallels.. not on the best settings, but it runs and runs good enough to play.

    If you're serious about playing games, then use Boot Camp to play games and use your Boot Camp disk as a Parallels VM for work.
     
  16. archdelux thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Oct 12, 2008
    #16
    So then would you say that it is a substantial loss in performance? I understand that every laptop will take a hit, but I am wondering just how substantial that hit is.


    Well, as it stands I am willing to spend that extra X dollars on a MBP given certain stats. However, I am unsure how significantly the performance will suffer. I do understand what you are trying to say, however, and so the question is what is the equivalent stats for a system running FUsion.

    So say you are running a MBP with, (hopefully) Corei5, 2.53ghz, 4GB ram, etc (but this MBP is running Fusion). This is essentially equivalent to what stats on a PC only running windows? (this is just another way to phrase the question above)
     
  17. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #17
    I don't really know how to quantify that... What is my measuring stick? What am I running in each OS? Your laptop only has 2 cores, so each one will be dedicated to a particular OS. THe more RAM you have, the better your life will be. Running 2 OSes is not make both unusable, just slower, assuming you haven't short-changed yourself on RAM.

    I'm not aware of anyone having that particular information. Best guess, a PC with an integrated graphics chip running a single core processor at ~2GHz or 2.33GHz with 2GB of RAM? If you're serious about running a lot in Windows, you should consider more RAM in your Mac.

    Mac Pro:
    2.8GHz Quad-Core Xeon, 8GB RAM, Mac OS X Server 10.5.8

    Windows VM via Parallels 5:
    2.8GHz single Xeon CPU, 2GB RAM, Windows 7 Enterprise .x64, Windows Experience Index is 4.6

    I could probably get a better index score if I quit some apps on both sides of the fence, but I've got **** to do. :)
     
  18. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

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    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #18
    Partially because it'll depend very heavily on what you intend to do in each OS, and how much (RAM/CPU) you set aside for the VM. Your mileage may vary.

    I fully agree with your point. More RAM. 4 GB should be seen as a bare minimum if you want to smoothly run both OS X and W7 64 bit.

    B
     
  19. Rodus macrumors 6502a

    Rodus

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    Oct 25, 2008
    Location:
    Midlands, UK
    #19
    you can rely on Windows in Bootcamp, just download the correct Windows drivers. To be fair to Apple most of the ones they provide tend to be fine, it's just the GPU ones that I see as vital to get from the manufacturers site.
     
  20. archdelux thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Oct 12, 2008
    #20
    So you're saying that the battery life issues and the trackpad issues have been resolved by the drivers?
     
  21. archdelux thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    #21
    Following up after the Apple update: So the MBP 13s are Core2Duo, not i5.

    Say I get a C2D 2.4Ghz with 8GB RAM...do you think that will be sufficient to do essentially anything (other than gaming/etc) smoothly using Fusion/Parallels?
    Alternatively, would 4GB suffice for standard use (the most 'intense' thing I do is watching streaming TV shows full-screen).

    Will the 2.4ghz vs. 2.66ghz make a noticeable difference for my use?
     

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