Super-mac-computer

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by barijazz, Dec 31, 2007.

  1. barijazz macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    #1
    I currently have a 15" mbp a 17" iMac and soon a mac pro (I'm going to max ram and graphics). But I'm wondering if there is a way to connect all these computers to make my own mini super computer. I know this is done when all of these computers are connected and a task is divided up between all the resources. I also want to know if there is a way to detach my mbp from this link to carry around and reattach it when I get home without disturbing the computer.
     
  2. GimmeSlack12 macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #2
    You could use Synergy (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&ct=r...tcFbhQFT5cNNzg&sig2=z_vkB-r0YgkUnr6bfJWeoQ)to distribute your control of your computers, and I know you can setup Distributed Computing using Apple Remote Desktop (though I've never actually done it). What are you using these machines for that require this amount of power?

    EDIT: And a Mac Pro that is maxed out? I would imagine you will need to look into OS X Server to acquire the combined power of these computers. Not beginner stuff by any means.
     
  3. tersono macrumors 68000

    tersono

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #3
    Well, it won't be a 'supercomputer' but clustering machines does, obviously, increase the amount of work that can be processed in a given time....

    The burning question is..... To do what?

    It depends entirely on what you need the cluster to run as to how you'd best go about it... OS X Server supports clustering and there are several other methods (Pooch comes to mind, but there are a number of application-specific methods too - even something as lowly as Bryce comes with basic clustering functionality).

    Do bear in mind, however, that whatever your application is, it will need to have been designed to work with clustering to be used in that way.
     
  4. barijazz thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    #5
    I just realized I'd have to connect all of these computers and am also wondering how I would do that? Would I just use a firewire or USB or what? Would that slow it down.
     
  5. mojohanna macrumors 6502a

    mojohanna

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Location:
    Cleveland
    #6
    Couldn't you do it via gigabit ethernet on all of them? Maybe you would need some sort of networking equipment, but in our office, everything is linked over the network. I am thinking that this would be the way to go, I just don't know the details.

    It sounds cool though. particularly if you might be doing a lot of rendering and could couple the processing power to get it all done sooner. I wonder if any of :apple:'s pro apps support that type of set up?
     
  6. tersono macrumors 68000

    tersono

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #7
    Gigabit ethernet connections.

    You still haven't given us any idea about what you intend to do with the cluster, though, which severely restricts the advice we can give....
     
  7. Killyp macrumors 68040

    Killyp

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    #8
    A cluster won't speed up most tasks.

    Only something such as encoding a large video or rendering a large animation etc... will benefit from cluster processing...
     
  8. synth3tik macrumors 68040

    synth3tik

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    #9
    Using the software listed by others here and connecting the computers through gigabit ethernet you can fairly easily set up a Mac farm where you can distribute processor loads between the three machines.

    If your doing this just because you can, cool. Otherwise with the Mac Pro you will have much power at your hands.
     
  9. bmcgonag macrumors 65816

    bmcgonag

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    #10
    Clustered computing is also useful for scientific data analysis when large, complex formulas and algorithms are involved.

    Most clusters these days actually run on Linux, but using macs is possible. Unless you are doing some extremely heavy computing, I doubt you will make much use of the power in your hands, but in the event that I'm wrong, check out Clustered Computing on google.

    You would definitely use gigabit ethernet, a switch, a hub or something to assign the ips, and some special software to get it all going.

    Some was listed above in the post. Know, that many computational processes will actually be slowed by splitting it over several compute nodes.

    Best of luck,

    Brian
     
  10. bloodycape macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #11
    This actually brings up an interesting question/point. I got a MBP and a ibook. Would I be able to cluster the machines so I can work with FCE so the files can render faster? Or do I need FCP/FCS?
     
  11. stainlessliquid macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
  12. Killyp macrumors 68040

    Killyp

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    Jun 14, 2006

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