Superfluous Communications Features

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by kerosene, Sep 16, 2014.

  1. kerosene macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    #1
    Can't make any sense of the digital touch communication features Apple packed into their watch: Sketch, Tap, Heartbeat. For me by far the weakest point in their presentation. Kevin Lynch trying to convince us that his friend and he had agreed on a certain tap sequence to catch each other's attention for lunch, then the drawing of a fish and the reply by sharing one's hearbeat. Seriously? Sorry, but to me that's borderline inane (not sure which side of). It's painful to think of it.

    So if Apple fails to make a good case for the usability of these features during their keynote, they're juvinile gimmicks at best, or plain superfluous at worst. In either case, Apple is degrading itself and its product by adding (useless) features instead of placing focus on the core usefulness a watch has always had - instant information/notification at the turn of a wrist.
     
  2. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #2
    This is an East Asian cultural geared feature. In countries like China, Japan and Korea emoticons and figure based communication is a natural extension of their written language.
     
  3. kerosene thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 13, 2008
    #3
    Good point, probably more useful in languages where a written character stands for a whole word. Don't know if that already exists, but this would work well with an iPhone app that essentially does the same but with more space available, and that keeps track of such 'conversations'.

    For alphabet based written languages etc it's a rather clumsy toy.
     
  4. rengb6 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2013
    #4

    This is exactly what I thought when I viewed the keynote. It seemed like Apple was pitching the watch to teenagers and East Asian cultures. I did find Kevin Lynch's exchange with his friend a tad creepy though. I can't imagine many grown men wanting to feel their male friend's heart beats. With that said, my boyfriend and I have decided we'll be exchanging heartbeats regularly :p
     
  5. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #5
    Exactly, the Asian market is SUPER important to Apple. While old farts like me probably won't use this, Apple sees this as a new way of communication/connecting that might catch on with young Westerners too.
     
  6. kerosene thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 13, 2008
    #6
    Yes Julien, so are the gold-loving markets of Eastern European and Arabic background. Many there used to custom gold plate their iPhones, now Apple wants to make this business their own.

    It seems clear to me that Apple is trying to please too many at the same time, at the expense of clarity and focus. These playful features may motivate some to buy the watch, but at the same time distract from core functionality which will put off others. I really don't want this junk on my wrist.

    Let's hope Apple will at least have the sense to allow users to disable these features.
     
  7. StoneJack, Sep 16, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2014

    StoneJack macrumors 6502a

    StoneJack

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2009
    #7
    The Asians (Japanese who invented emojis - emotional letters in translation) will be able to make a best use of this feature: expect millions of Asians, accustomed to sending emojis and smilies to make a create vast libraries of different characters for sending over the watch. In fact, they can send just one or two kanjis like this: 愛、独、寂、元気 to convey complex feelings (the characters stand for love, alone, sad, feeling great). And its without all other symbols which may add to it. Now, with Europeans and Americans, all kinds of similar messages through symbols like smileys, hearts and etc are fully possible. Thats gonna be an explosion of Apple Watch messages coupled with heartbeat numbers and pushes all over the Asia.

    Knowing Asians, you will find a lot of young ladies with rose gold Apple watches and a lot of young guys with sports or other editions just in few weeks in all major Asian cities even where the initial launch is not planned. Ironically, despite having likes of LG, Samsung and Sony, Japanese and Koreans actually prefer Apple products, maybe for its simplicity, reliability and great design. Any wealthy Chinese would have something made by Apple, maybe iMac or iPhone; likes of Meizu or Xiaomi exist actually for those who can't afford Apple products. Thats why mid tier companies like HTC are facing falling demand, squeezed on high end by Apple and Samsung and on low end by Chinese brands.

    There used to one strata of wealthy Asians who preferred Samsung and Xperia: simply because they like giant screens; no more, you will find them lusting after 6 plus. Samsung's Galaxies and Notes are in deep, deep trouble. Apple brand name and large screen plus the ability to send characters over Apple Watch is just unbelievably irresistible. I don't know if S gear or LG watches have a similar feature, but Apple absolutely nailed it.

    On gold edition, I never had interest of high end watches; however after reading some reviews from experts in luxury watches, the overall opinion that Apple created a truly new monster which very well may endanger the whole luxury watch industry and that Apple did great job in creating the watch and that Apple is a force to reckon with. Their reviews start with words "American technological giant" and are full of respect for nailing it by a first try.
     
  8. mtmac macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    #8
    Don't underestimate the youth market, who have previously created a new quick texting language. While you or I may not use those features, most aps on phones and computers aren't used by most users. It's just a platform so people can decide what works for them. Don't expect to use every feature on the watch any more than you would use every feature on a phone or computer. This is a personal device and they were wise to integrate personal features, even if only a smaller percentage of the market that buys them uses them. One man's superfluous feature is another man's killer ap. L8r.
     
  9. SHNXX macrumors 68000

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    Oct 2, 2013
    #9
    sending the heart rate or ghetto looking emoticons are not exactly what Asians want either.
     
  10. kerosene thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 13, 2008
    #10
    No I don't mind but only if these features can be disabled. We don't know yet if they can.
     
  11. kmj2318 macrumors 68000

    kmj2318

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Location:
    Naples, FL
    #11
    When they call these features intimate, they mean more intimate than they could show at the keynote. The taps, doodles, and heartbeats are probably not for your work friends. You wouldn't get the watch because of that. But imagine you're dating someone who already has the watch, that's a huge reason to get the watch. Or if you're in a relationship, you might both want to get one so you can use them together for the novelty.

    This is not core functionality, but Apple is banking on the network effect. And people can be extremely frivolous when they're in love or horny.

    Maybe it'll work or not, who knows.
     

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