Surge Protectors and Removing Standard Programs

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Jack Parker, Jan 21, 2015.

  1. Jack Parker macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2015
    #1
    Just a couple of quick, embarrassing questions from a basic user with simple computer needs.

    1) For those who have an iMac, do you plug it directly into an electrical socket, or do you use a surge protector of some kind?

    2) There are programs on my iMac that I just don't use and want to know if I can delete them for the extra space/memory. Programs like Mail, Messages, Contacts, Reminders, Game Center, PhotoBooth, Calendar, Notes and FaceTime.
     
  2. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

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    Apr 25, 2012
    #2
    Regardless of the computer I HIGHLY suggest a good quality surge protector. Make sure it's actually a surge protector and not just a power strip (there IS a difference) and don't cheap out on it, though I wouldn't suggest a $200 Monster Cable one. I go one step further and use a UPS on any of my expensive stuff, and if you consider a $200 Monster Power surge protector, might as well get an APC UPS.

    Those apps are all considered part of the core OS (meaning they don't get updated unless the OS does), getting rid of them may be difficult but you can remove them from your dock and squirrel them away in a group in Launchpad so you don't have to look at them.
     
  3. Dave Braine macrumors 68040

    Dave Braine

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    Mar 19, 2008
    Location:
    Warrington, UK
    #3
    Mail: 62Mb
    Contacts: 29Mb
    Reminders: 16Mb
    etc, etc.

    Is it worth removing them for the minute amount of HDD space they take up. You never know when you might want to use them.
     
  4. Xeridionix macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    #4
    1. I've always connected any computer I've owned to a surge protector, regardless of whether it's a desktop or notebook. You won't hurt anything by doing so, just make sure that you get a decent surge protector (such as one from APC for example) as cheap ones are usually just power strips and not true surge protectors. It's better to be safe than sorry.

    2. You can't normally delete the built-in applications in OS X. There are ways to do it but there's not much point as they don't take up a huge amount of space, and will likely be restored when you update OS X in the future. It's best to just leave them alone.

    I hope that helps and have a great day.
     
  5. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    Behind the Lens, UK
    #5
    In the UK, you can buy a surge protector that cost around £50, and you get several £1000 of cover if your Mac blows. For me it's a no brainer.

    As for deleting stock apps, its your decision, but as pointed out above is it worth it for the small space you will save?
     
  6. Dave Braine macrumors 68040

    Dave Braine

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    Mar 19, 2008
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    #6
  7. westom macrumors regular

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    Nov 8, 2009
    #7
    Anyone can read specification numbers. A $10 power strip protector may claim to absorb hundreds of joules. An APC UPS typically claims to absorb even lesser joules. A UPS is typically near zero protection.

    A Mac, like most electronics, converts a hundreds joules surge into low and rock stable DC voltages to safely power its semiconductors. Near zero surges are made irrelevant by protection already inside every appliance.

    Concern is a completely different transient (also called a surge) that will overwhelm protection already inside appliances. It may be hundreds of thousands of joules. Protection from potentially destructive surges (and all other types of surges) must exist where utility wires enter the building.

    Facilities that cannot have damage use this other and proven solution. A residential version costs about £1 per protected appliance. Is provided by other companies of better integrity.

    Lightning can be 20,000 amps. So this proven 'whole house' solution is at least 50,000 amps. An effective recommendation is not even damaged by direct lightning strikes and other 'actually destructive' surges.

    Price says nothing about quality. Informed consumers view specification numbers. How many (near zero) joules does that APC claim to absorb?

    What does it do when it tries to absorb a destrutive surge (ie hundreds of thousands of joules)? Be concerned about fire. That APC is simply another device that needs protection provided by one properly earthed 'whole house' protector. The least expensive solution also has specification numbers that define superior protection.
     
  8. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    #8
  9. Jack Parker thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2015
    #9
    My apologies for my delay in responding. Crazy life at the moment. Thank you everyone for your responses. Very helpful and very appreciated!

    @hallux - Great suggestions. I've always used a surge protector but I'm such a basic technology user that I didn't know if something "new" came out to replace them. I'll check into the items you recommended. Many thanks!

    @David Braine - I didn't realize they took up that little space. Thanks for that. I may just "squirrel them away" as hallux recommended. The only apps in my dock at the moment (my mid-2007 iMac that's getting replaced) are Finder, Safari, Firefox, Launchpad, Dashboard, Text and System Preferences. How's that for minimal?!

    @Xeridionix - I appreciate that. Good to have the confirmation.

    @Apple fanboy - Great confirmation all around. Thanks.

    @westom - I appreciate having a different opinion to research. Thanks for taking the time to type your's out.
     
  10. westom, Jan 23, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2015

    westom macrumors regular

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    Nov 8, 2009
    #10
    Nothing 'new' came out. Early on, five cent MOV parts (a new technology) were put in little cubes and sold for less than two dollars. Manufacturers such as Belkin, Tripplite, and Panamax learned these same protectors could be sold for $20+ by simply using a bigger box and calling it a "protector".

    Next spin was "power conditioner". Fancier looking boxes sometimes with a voltage display. Same specifications that claim same protection. But so many now recommend $100 and $200 "power conditioners" because it sounds like it does more. It costs more. So it must be better.

    Monster has a long history of identifying scams. Then selling an expensive looking one for even greater profit. If Monster is selling an equivalent, then you know something is afoot. Monster sells an equivalent $20 power strip for over $80.

    How does one identify a quality protector? Price? Is it "quality" because it is now called a "power conditioner"? Scams are easily promoted by not saying why it works. No specification numbers (and not just for protectors) is a first reason to be suspicious.
     

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