surprised, gaming pc much cheaper than thought

dogboy122

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 12, 2012
36
0
r'lyeh
i was looking at gaming pc parts and found out i could build a decent one for only 414 dollars:eek:, not as bad as i thought!.
 

SlickShoes

macrumors 6502a
Jan 24, 2011
638
0
414 dollars is about £300, its pretty much impossible to build a "gaming" PC for that price in the UK anyway.

What do you define as decent anyway? Please post the components in your build.
 

SlickShoes

macrumors 6502a
Jan 24, 2011
638
0
Not impossible at all, but you do have to make some compromises. Eurogamer did a recent article about building a £300 gaming PC
That's a pretty savvy build for the price they paid but it assumes you have Windows OS already, a monitor, keyboard, mouse, speakers.

I don't like how they kept comparing it to the Alienware m14x either, they are comparing a laptop to a desktop, they are saying that the alienware costs £1000 but there build is only £300, however the alienware has a monitor, keyboard/mouse, speakers, its portable as it's a laptop and you can take it anywhere, that's why it's £700 more, I wonder how much they could build a laptop for with a similar performance to the alienware m14x.
 

CapnBiggles

macrumors newbie
Aug 1, 2012
2
0
My threshold for building a decent gaming PC on a budget is $500. I can promise that the price would include almost all needed periphrals (aside from monitor, I'm a stickler there) and would be able to play all contemporary games at most 16:9/16:10 aspect ratio resolutions on a 23 inch screen or smaller. I tend to go higher budget-wise since I prefer quality brand parts for specific purposes.

I've been building PCs for gaming since 2002, roughly.
 

Ap0ks

macrumors 6502
Aug 12, 2008
307
58
Cambridge, UK
That's a pretty savvy build for the price they paid but it assumes you have Windows OS already, a monitor, keyboard, mouse, speakers.

I don't like how they kept comparing it to the Alienware m14x either, they are comparing a laptop to a desktop, they are saying that the alienware costs £1000 but there build is only £300, however the alienware has a monitor, keyboard/mouse, speakers, its portable as it's a laptop and you can take it anywhere, that's why it's £700 more, I wonder how much they could build a laptop for with a similar performance to the alienware m14x.
It's really aimed at console gamers but yeah you would have to pay extra for Windows. A basic keyboard and mouse could be had for under £20 and you could hook it up to a HDTV rather than a monitor to give you both display and sound ;)

Comparing a laptop to a desktop really is apples and oranges so not sure why they were doing that.
 

SlickShoes

macrumors 6502a
Jan 24, 2011
638
0
It's really aimed at console gamers but yeah you would have to pay extra for Windows. A basic keyboard and mouse could be had for under £20 and you could hook it up to a HDTV rather than a monitor to give you both display and sound ;)

Comparing a laptop to a desktop really is apples and oranges so not sure why they were doing that.
Yeah I built a cheap gaming PC a few years ago and just hooked it up to my TV, it was ok for games that used a controller but sitting on my couch trying to play with a mouse and keyboard was a bit of a mess! Also it was a 720p TV so most games looked terrible on such a large screen.
 

RedTomato

macrumors 601
Mar 4, 2005
4,024
318
.. London ..
If you have an old desktop ATX system (salvaged from work or parents) $400 / £300 will go a long way.

New mobo / processor / RAM / video card and you're sorted. (especially if you already have the old monitor and it's not too bad.)

With a decent mobo, you could cheap out on the processor or RAM and leave yourself headroom for a big but cheap upgrade in the future. Say, a low end i3 processor (I only buy intel so that I can go the Hackintosh route in the future if needed), or 2x 4GB RAM (maybe 1x8GB even) to leave 2 (or 3) RAM slots free.

Maybe a cheapish £120 graphics card. Even a lowend i3 from last year is a powerhouse, and you can put in an i7 at some point in the future.

Desktops are excellent value at the moment - I keep thinking about buying a new rig / upgrading my old one but TBH I probably won't ever buy a desktop again - just doesn't suit me. I'm currently repurposing my old desktop into an UnRaid NAS server.
 

SlickShoes

macrumors 6502a
Jan 24, 2011
638
0
If you have an old desktop ATX system (salvaged from work or parents) $400 / £300 will go a long way.

New mobo / processor / RAM / video card and you're sorted. (especially if you already have the old monitor and it's not too bad.)

With a decent mobo, you could cheap out on the processor or RAM and leave yourself headroom for a big but cheap upgrade in the future. Say, a low end i3 processor (I only buy intel so that I can go the Hackintosh route in the future if needed), or 2x 4GB RAM (maybe 1x8GB even) to leave 2 (or 3) RAM slots free.

Maybe a cheapish £120 graphics card. Even a lowend i3 from last year is a powerhouse, and you can put in an i7 at some point in the future.

Desktops are excellent value at the moment - I keep thinking about buying a new rig / upgrading my old one but TBH I probably won't ever buy a desktop again - just doesn't suit me. I'm currently repurposing my old desktop into an UnRaid NAS server.
I am the same as your last paragraph there, I used to love building them and still kind of do love it but I can't see me using one at home any time soon. I like the mobility of laptops now and sitting on my couch is much more appealing than sitting at a desk since I work at one all day long.