Surround Audio & MacBook Pro

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by weatherstaff, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. weatherstaff macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2008
    #1
    Hello:

    I just purchased the MacBook Pro (the $1999 version), and currently own a set of Logitech 5.1 Z5500 speakers.

    I would like to connect my MBP to the speaker system, with the object of producing the best quality sound overall, and if possible, not loosing true-surround where I can get it (DVDs?, etc).

    Given that there is only one digital audio output on the MBP, and my Logitech speaker system has both optical and 6-channel direct inputs, what should I use to connect the MBP to the speakers? Again my goal is overall sound quality and true-surround if possible.

    My second question is, if I wanted to use the 6-channel direct cable, what would I need to buy to achieve the necessary output on my MBP (some sort of external card, or adapter?)? Again, the MBP only has an optical/digital output.

    (I have both the optical cable and the 6-channel direct cables already)

    Thanks!

    C
     
  2. yippy macrumors 68020

    yippy

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #2
    Seems pretty simple, the Macbook Pro has optical and so do the speakers. Connect with cable and done!

    There are only two ways to get better than stereo sound out of a MacBook Pro, using the built in optical out or buying an external sound card. Since your speakers take optical in I see no reason to buy the sound card.
     
  3. weatherstaff thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2008
    #3
    Thanks.

    Thanks for the advice. So the 6-channel direct isn't considered a higher quality connection? I realize I'd need an external, but just making sure.

    C
     
  4. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #4
    No, it's not. Not only is it inferior in quality (loss of the analog signal as it travels down the wires), but you are limited to 6 channels. With optical, you can passthrough whatever is encoded in the digital audio file (e.g., 5.1, 7.1, whatever). Of course, you'd still need a receiver capable of handling all those channels.
     

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