Switch to Mac? Convince me.

asmallchild

macrumors regular
Nov 25, 2007
205
0
Windows user here for the past 15 years.

I can count on a single (severed) hand how many times I've had issues with spyware / viruses / crashing.

In short, I've been more than pleased with Windows.

But I still switched over to Mac a month ago and have been 100% pleased as well.

Both work for me but the Mac just does it so stylishly.
 

bigjnyc

macrumors 603
Apr 10, 2008
6,361
3,445
it sounds like you have nothing to lose by switching, it's either switch or buy another windows machine thats going to die on you in a year. its a no brainer really. get a mac and if by the 14 day return period you dont like it then simply return it, pay the restocking fee and consider it a rental.
 

asmallchild

macrumors regular
Nov 25, 2007
205
0
it sounds like you have nothing to lose by switching, it's either switch or buy another windows machine thats going to die on you in a year. its a no brainer really. get a mac and if by the 14 day return period you dont like it then simply return it, pay the restocking fee and consider it a rental.
that's an awfully expensive rental

$200 for 2 weeks of a MBP (at least)

I'd recommend playing with it in the store. That should provide plenty of insight on how the machine actually runs.
 

digitalnicotine

macrumors 65816
Jan 11, 2008
1,171
38
USA
It sounds like you've had serious issues with PC's. A lot of them seem to be either user error, or poor manufacturing. One of the things I hate about off the shelf PC's is all the bloatware, and the learning curve just to keep them running well. While they can indeed be had for a lower price, you often get what you pay for. While I have nothing to gain by promoting one format over the other, the one thing that is unique to Macs is that you can run both OSX and Windows.

With Macs, the likelihood of getting a lot of spyware and virus related issues is very low. It's possible, but not probable, at least for now, as few hackers/programmers write such for OSX. This may change in time, based on the success of Apple's market share.

The things you stated you're interested in doing fit well with a MBP. I own a MBP 17" (older model), and use Final Cut Pro for video editing. It's a very nice product, and comparable to Adobe's offerings.

FCP runs fine on a MBP, assuming you don't intend to edit large HD files. There are also Mac versions for Adobe products. I'd seriously consider getting the highest capacity drive at 7200 RPM for video editing, as well as looking into some firewire 800 or eSATA drives (you can get an expresscard with SATA ports).

The high end custom configured MBP is expensive, but not more so than comparably configured alternative brands. There aren't many laptops on the market that can match it's spec's, but the few that do are similar in price, (and geared towards gamers).

I realize you are interested in ways of getting the MBP as cheaply as possible, but I can't help but caution you on this. In order to get it built to order, you'll probably have to purchase it from Apple's online store, as they don't do BTO's in their brick and mortar stores. Your alternative solution is to purchase a refurb, buy at an authorized retailer, (where you're not likely to have BTO options), or buy used. At Amazon, you can likely buy without paying taxes (depending on your location), but you forego the HD screen option, for example. You might find one with the specs you want on eBay, for a reduced price.

Since MBP's are rumored to be updated soon, it's pretty likely you'll find a refurb on Apple's site, or a "new" but then previous model on eBay or in MR marketplace, if you're willing to get the Penryn (current) model. It will handle your needs quite well, as will the previous versions. The main issues with the older models have been screen yellowing (mine doesn't have these issues), or heat issues that were improved with the Penryn (current) CPU chip. The current (Penryn) model also has improved battery use times over previous models.

As far as convincing you to switch to a Mac, I think it's unnecessary. You're considering purchasing a laptop that was literally built to suit the very needs you'll be using it for. Check out this site, specific for video editors, and see what they say about the MBP. I've never heard of a PC laptop that was built specifically for on the go video editing. They may exist, but I've never heard of any, which is my point. ;)

Once you get past the initial sticker shock, I'm certain you'll be very pleased with your decision. But the best part is this: If you are not? You have options. Obviously, you can return it, and take the 10% restocking fee hit. Or you can sell it for astonishingly close to what you paid for it. The resale value on Macs is outstanding when compared to competitors. Check out eBay to see what people are getting for them.

So, you're not taking a huge risk here. You've already paid far more than you could possibly lose on this risk by purchasing PC desktops that lasted you a few months. :) Apple does stand behind their warranties, and Apple Care is worth it, imo. I've read a few posts on MR by people who've had repeated issues with their MBP's, and have received a brand new, current model replacement that obviously was more powerful than the one they initially purchased.

Of course it won't cover you for accidental damage, or theft, but considering the investment, a few hundred dollars for piece of mind is worth it imo. You can think about it, and have a year to decide after purchasing. If you decide to get it, don't buy it from Apple. Look on eBay or Amazon for lower prices on Apple Care.

I realize you may already have a Windows suite of tools for video editing, and would highly recommend switching to Final Cut Studio, or the Mac Adobe versions so you can run them natively, rather than trying to run a windows editor through bootcamp. It will likely work either way, but you'll have faster render times running natively. Yes, this is an investment for software, but again, if things don't work out, you can sell it. Although, if you currently have the Adobe suite, you can trade your Adobe PC software for Mac versions. Just call them. :)

BTW, I use my MBP for video editing, 3d rendering (nothing huge), music creation, animation, and the basic apps such as email and web browsing. I have never regretted switching, and didn't experience buyers remorse. OSX is more intuitive, but after using a PC for several years, you'll likely have to unlearn a few things, and take some time to really get to know your new OS. It's worth the effort, and once you've found yourself feeling comfortable with it, you'll be amazed at how simple and logical it is.

I know there are a lot of Mac fanboys out there who insist that Steve Jobs is a god, and Apple is their religion, or something. But the fact is, a lot of people are fed up with wrestling their computer just to get it to do what they want. We use computers so much more now than we did 5 and 10 years ago, and having a good OS is starting to matter a lot more. This is part of why Apple's market share is steadily increasing. People are less willing to deal with the frustration tolerance required to use Windows, and more willing to pay a bit more for a computer that's easier, and more pleasant to use.

Mac's aren't perfect. Some come from the factory with defects. Some have design flaws that cause issues for several users of the same system. But when/if this happens, Apple will stand behind their product, and fix the problem. Every electronics company has some products that are shipped with defects, it's just how things go. But not every company stands behind their product. What's riskier? Buying a slightly cheaper system that supports potential issues for 30 days, and then you're SOL? Or a company that supports your system for a full year, with the option of extending that coverage for 3 years (for a few hundred bucks)?

Apple makes OSX, so of course they'll support you on potential issues with it, unlike Gateway, who doesn't make Windows, and therefore feels no obligation to extend their coverage of Microsoft's software. So there you have it. Sorry it was so long! Good luck to you on your decision. :)
 

shikimo

macrumors 6502
Jan 17, 2007
377
0
Lyon, France
That's a long, thoughtful post, digitalnicotine, and by someone with a cool username...too bad this thread's a year old and the OP never posted back:(.

Maybe he was taken by aliens.
 

digitalnicotine

macrumors 65816
Jan 11, 2008
1,171
38
USA
That's a long, thoughtful post, digitalnicotine, and by someone with a cool username...too bad this thread's a year old and the OP never posted back:(.

Maybe he was taken by aliens.
Now you tell me :p LOL oh well, it's still there for others who may search for it. :) I didn't think to check the date on the OP's post :eek:, but you can bet I will from now on. Got a good giggle out of it anyway. ;)
 

fuzzielitlpanda

macrumors 6502a
Mar 24, 2008
834
0
Windows user here for the past 15 years.

I can count on a single (severed) hand how many times I've had issues with spyware / viruses / crashing.

In short, I've been more than pleased with Windows.

But I still switched over to Mac a month ago and have been 100% pleased as well.

Both work for me but the Mac just does it so stylishly.
me too. the only reason i bought a mb was because it was very stylish. osx is great, but so is windows.
 

mreg376

macrumors 65816
Mar 23, 2008
1,122
309
Brooklyn, NY
Okay,

I've ready the mac website's arguments to convert to mac. I've talked with friends who have them, (and pretty much everyone loves their mac. I don't think i've met someone who said they hatted it. Compared to pretty much everyone who owns a PC.) But, i'm not quite ready to drink the Kool-Aid yet. Mac's are expensive. And i'm not sure I'm ready to drop the dough on one.

I've pretty much never had a PC that didn't crash within a year. Every PC i've ever had became pretty mun inoperable with spyware, virus or just general hardware or software failure. After spending 4 hrs on Microsoft support with a technician as he fixed my media center I realized I'm sick and tired of buying crappy 1/2 broken PC's. The funniest thing about it was that I bought the media center PC for those features but ended up not being able to use it after 3 months of using it. Will I REALLY notice a difference switching to a mac?

I'm going to be doing video editing, writing screenplays and video production business on it, (aside from normal stuff like watching DVD's, email, web surfing..pictures..etc.)

I'm thinking of getting a Macbook Pro 17" pimped out with the high rez display, and the largest HD they offer. I'll upgrade the ram myself later on to save some money. I've also thought of buying a refurbished mac. I'm thinking MacBook Pro because I have a small apartment and My PC tower pretty much takes up all the available space in my office. Any ideas on how to get one for a cheeper price?

Do I need Apple care? I bought the "extended warantee" on my Gateway PC at Circuit City and when I called because I had a software problem they said it only covered software for 30 days. I said that my "extended warantee" I paid $170 covered me for 3 years. Alas, it was a lie. Is the Apple Care program worth it? or is it worthless profit padding by apple?
The question is simple. Do you like computers? Do you enjoy "computing"? Do you want to be where computing should be in 2008? If so, get a Mac. If a computer is just an appliance to you, like a toaster or telephone, save your money and stay with Windows. It's the choice between a Ford Taurus and a Lexus. They'll both eventually get you there. But which would you rather drive?
 

dsnort

macrumors 68000
Jan 28, 2006
1,904
68
In persona non grata
Switch to Mac? Convince me.
Actually, you have that backwards. If you want to join the Cult of Mac there's an application to fill out and a fairly lengthy interview process. :D

I keed, I keed.

Switched two years ago, a few hints.

1. It ain't Windows. There will be a "Learning Curve", during which time you might feel like an arm has been severed. But it's worth it.

2. Check your apps. If there is some app you must have, make sure it has Mac version or a Mac equivalent you can live with. If not, stick with Windoze.

Other than that, it's all good. Macs ain't perfect, but they are damned good!
 

bigjnyc

macrumors 603
Apr 10, 2008
6,361
3,445
That's a long, thoughtful post, digitalnicotine, and by someone with a cool username...too bad this thread's a year old and the OP never posted back:(.

Maybe he was taken by aliens.
lol i didnt even notice the date, why was this post resurrected?
 

shikimo

macrumors 6502
Jan 17, 2007
377
0
Lyon, France
Right on...too bad he didn't come back to his original thread :cool:.

lol i didnt even notice the date, why was this post resurrected?
Looks like the thread was just sitting here waiting to die, and then martyrk and Hawkeye checked in to see if the OP was still breathing, and then a bunch of people skimmed over these two messages--the only two that imply a time warp--which led to a whole series of 'why you should switch' posts by folks who (understandably) didn't notice the dates.

I wonder if waywardsage will ever notice that we're over here talking about him while he wrestles with his PB memory demons :).
 

mreg376

macrumors 65816
Mar 23, 2008
1,122
309
Brooklyn, NY
Actually, you have that backwards. If you want to join the Cult of Mac there's an application to fill out and a fairly lengthy interview process. :D

I keed, I keed.

Switched two years ago, a few hints.

1. It ain't Windows. There will be a "Learning Curve", during which time you might feel like an arm has been severed. But it's worth it.

2. Check your apps. If there is some app you must have, make sure it has Mac version or a Mac equivalent you can live with. If not, stick with Windoze.

Other than that, it's all good. Macs ain't perfect, but they are damned good!
But there's always Fusion or Parallels for that "unique" Windows program that you MUST keep...