Switching to a Mac

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by Bigtyme07, Jan 22, 2017.

  1. Bigtyme07 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2016
    #1
    So I'm really thinking about switching to an all Apple device ecosystem. Right now I've got a gaming PC that I built and would consider an "enthusiast" build. A dell XPS 13 and a Galaxy S7 Edge. I suppose I should tell you why I'm wanting to switch... I'm not into gaming anymore and ever since I stopped gaming I realized how much I didn't like Windows and Android. I've got a minimalist/OCD mindset to begin with and windows with all of its random popups, inconsistencies, and useless start menus, bugs, and glitches, it really annoys me and I hate the inconsistent experience I have between my desktop/laptop and phone. My XPS started having terrible coil whine after 2 weeks of buying it and it's a 1000 dollar laptop, my custom gaming pc won't go to sleep and stay asleep for more than 10 minutes. Anyways I just don't see a point in sticking with windows as I think the apple ecosystem would give me a lot more satisfaction. As far as use, I read a ton of books, articles, and do have been just doing a lot of research on things that interest me and taking notes might be starting my own business in the future but at this time and date it's not in the foreseeable future. Let me know what you guys think and if it's worth it. Thanks!
     
  2. theatremusician macrumors member

    theatremusician

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2013
    #2
    If you do make the switch, I'd wait until after WWDC in the summer. If Apple doesn't announce up to date spec machines, I'd stick with Windows.
     
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    Location:
    Boston
    #3
    What are you looking for, desktop, laptop?
    What are your usage and your budget?

    The MBPs were just updated and so they'll not see anything until the fall at the earliest. People are expecting or hoping to see new iMacs by this spring, though there's no concrete proof well see new iMacs in March.

    As for the Mac Pro, and Mini, its been so long since an update, I'd not advise buying one of those even if apple udpates that line, because its clear that it will not be something they focus on.
     
  4. theluggage macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    #4
    So, have you actually used Macs or iOS much (a quick play in a shop doesn't really count)?

    If not, you might want to start small, maybe a refurb/second hand Mac Mini or Air, and log some hours with MacOS to see if it suits your needs, before replacing all your PC/Android gear with top-of-the range Apple kit.

    Also, you need some idea of what software you're going to be using & check out the Mac versions/alternatives - you certainly won't get the same range of games as on a custom gaming PC (but you seem to be resigned to that).

    You also need to decide between permutations such as:

    Desktop/all-in-one + tablet
    Desktop/all-in-one + super-sized phone
    Desktop/all-in-one + lightweight, low power laptop
    Powerful-but-lightweight light laptop for everything (+ phone)
    Really powerful luggable 'desktop replacement' laptop + tablet
    ...and so on.
     
  5. Bigtyme07 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jun 19, 2016
    #5
    probably just looking to get a laptop and phone initially and use the monitors I already have to connect my laptop to when I'm home. I have used macs ecosystem before but left due to me being into gaming. I use OneNote the most I'd say but can't you use windows programs in parallels?
     
  6. talmy macrumors 601

    talmy

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    Location:
    Oregon
    #6
    You can use Parallels, and that's what allowed me to switch to Mac over 10 years ago. But it's not really convenient and causes a certain amount of dissonance. Have a look at Mac programs (there is a OneNote for Mac, but it isn't the same, unfortunately).

    Frankly, I wouldn't worry about new models. Intel seems to have hit a performance wall and review of the latest chips, which Apple doesn't use, have been much less than stellar. If you aren't gaming or using taxing applications like video processing basically any Mac currently being sold will be fine. Actually even used ones that can be upgraded to Sierra are fine.
     
  7. davybe macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2015
    #7
    Switch, you'll be glad you did. macOS and iOS are extremely stable and butrtery smooth. Yeah you can watch for new models of this or that to avoid buying a Mac that is soon replaced, but that is secondary.
     
  8. Bigtyme07 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jun 19, 2016
    #8
    I'm confused as how using parallels causes dissonance, I feel like it provides the best of both worlds, and don't Macs tout their video and photo editing capabilities?
    --- Post Merged, Jan 23, 2017 ---
    Not quite ready to make the switch yet as I'm in a very busy time of my life so I'm planning on waiting for the next iPhone and next iteration of the macbook pro so they can work the bugs out of the touchbar.
     
  9. Zazoh macrumors 6502a

    Zazoh

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Location:
    Mico, Texas
    #9
    I thought you wanted a minimalist mac experience? I don't install any other programs to my Macs and get along fine. If you are looking to ditch the inconsistencies of Windows, not sure why you'd want to bring some programs over to the Mac.
     
  10. theatremusician macrumors member

    theatremusician

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    Dec 17, 2013
    #10
    That's the point. If Apple doesn't start updating their lines soon, there is little point in staying (or entering) the Apple computer ecosystem.
     
  11. talmy macrumors 601

    talmy

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    Oct 26, 2009
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    Oregon
    #11
    The dissonance comes from the two OS GUIs differing visually as well as in keyboard shortcuts. It's much easier to be "all in" on one OS or the other. I never used a Windows VM for anything but applications that were not available for the Mac.
     
  12. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #12
    The human brain is remarkable and I find I can easily transition from OS X to Windows and vice versa. Yes, there's an occasional cmd-c combination when I should have typed ctl-c but overall its not that hard.

    I use both platform regularly and its not too hard to distinguish between the two.
     
  13. burpootus macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2015
    #13
    In 2014 I wanted to make the switch from Windows/Android to Apple. I really dislike the direction Windows began with Windows 8. I was using a Galaxy Note 2 and love the larger phones. But with Android, I liked the customization and loading custom ROMs, and Verizon began requiring their devices to be bootloader locked. As a grandfathered unlimited user, I didn't want to change carriers. The Nexus 6 came out that fall and appeared to be the phone of my dreams, a Nexus device with a large screen that I could purchase outside of Verizon (unlocked bootloader). The problem is that (at least back in those days) Google is a disaster when it comes to launching and delivering devices. I found it impossible over a two week period to even order one. It just so happens that Apple also launched the 6 Plus around the same time. So I bit the bullet and went to the local Apple store and they had one in stock. Around the same time, I bought a 2012 Mac Mini refurb and turned it into my main computer. Since then I haven't looked back. The Apple ecosystem has been better for me. The Mini is now connected to a TV and my main computer is an iMac 27 5K. I really like the Unix underpinnings of the OS. Couldn't recommend a Mac more.
     
  14. techwarrior macrumors 6502

    techwarrior

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    Jul 30, 2009
    Location:
    Colorado
    #14
    Not sure why you would bother with Parallels. Aside from gaming, most PC apps either have a Mac equivalent, or there are other apps that can do the functions. Microsoft Office for Mac is quite good, including OneNote and OneDrive. Firefox and Chrome are also available on Mac. And, if you really do need Windoze for the rare occasion, BootCamp is included in macOS, so you can partition your HDD and dual boot to Win10 (don't bother with older Windoze releases). Or, if you have the space, keep the PC for the rare occasions. At work, I have a Mac with 2 24 inch monitors, and 2 PC with 1 24 inch monitor each. Using an inexpensive app called Synergy, I am able to navigate across all 4 monitors using a single mouse and keyboard with the mice and keyboards for the PC tucked away for the occasional login\reboots which require a directly connected input device.

    I dove into the Apple ecosystem in 2010 following a couple of years with iPhones. I use Mac exclusively at home, and at work I manage dozens of Linux, Windows and Mac machines. My iPhone and iPad seamlessly integrate with the Macs, and I have AppleTV at home and work for airplay video and audio to big screens, again with very little fuss.

    For newbies, there are plenty of helpful blog and forum sites that are a google away to help with any questions you may run into. Apple even has a good online guide that is targeted for PC users who are converting to Mac.

    But, for me, the biggest selling point with Macs is the "It just works" factor. I find myself constantly updating, battling malware\virus, and tweaking PC to get them to behave. Macs have a few updates every now and then for security patches, and a new OS comes out annually with new features...at no additional cost and applying these are as simple as Windows Update!

    Unless you have a burning need to be on the cutting edge, any 2011 or later Mac should give you the tight integration with iOS for a few years. Macs tend to have about a 5 year life, not in terms of hardware but in terms of support from Apple. Sure, some of the newer macOS features will only work on the newer Macs, but these are generally not essential for day to day use. So, to overcome the planned obsolescence factor, stick to a newer model.

    The latest models are adopting new connectors, and that may prove a bit of a challenge. For instance the MacBook and MacBook Pro now use USB-C or Thunderbolt\USB-C ports for power and external connections. You might need a dock or adapter to connect legacy DVI or HDMI monitors, and legacy (USB2 or 3) USB devices, etc.
     
  15. talmy macrumors 601

    talmy

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    Oct 26, 2009
    Location:
    Oregon
    #15
    I can give you my use case. In teaching some Electrical Engineering courses I needed to demonstrate Windows-only software in class while at the same time run Keynote and screen capturing video. I've also had to maintain software for Windows and write/maintain software for Linux as well as embedded software for which the IDEs were Windows only. Bootcamp is ugly if you want to share data or move instantly between OSes. Back in the 1990s I used to quadruple-boot a PC to get different OSes I needed. In the early 2000's I used multiple computers and a KVM switch. Since getting the Mac I use virtual machines. Much easier!

    I must say that today I rarely fire up Windows, and then only for software support of some programs I wrote "on the side". I'm basically 100% macOS since retiring last year.
     
  16. Moi Ici macrumors regular

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    Sep 21, 2012
    #16
    Nice to see that headline for a change....
     
  17. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    Oct 25, 2008
    #17
    To the OP - hope you find a Mac computer you like and maybe an iPhone for that "eco" system.

    As for Windows, have you considered Win 7 and running in a more "classic windows" mode? Whether it is physical or in a virtual, you may find it a more pleasant experience than 8 and above. I run both Win7 and Win10 in virtuals. I do the former for 3 apps that has no Mac counterpart and Win 10 because I need to stay Win "aware."
     
  18. decafjava, Jan 26, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2017

    decafjava macrumors 68000

    decafjava

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    Feb 7, 2011
    Location:
    Geneva
    #18
    This is my learning process right now. MacOS isn't second nature yet which slows me down a bit especially typing but I'm sure it will come.
     
  19. markfc macrumors 6502a

    markfc

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    Sep 18, 2006
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    Prestatyn, Wales, UK
    #19
    Probably a bit late to the game to be honest...
     
  20. Bigtyme07 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jun 19, 2016
    #20
    how so?
     
  21. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #21
    The less you use both at the same time, the harder it will be. I'm frequently in OS X and Windows at the same time; running OS X and remoting into my work PC for instance.
     
  22. Lihp8270 macrumors regular

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    Dec 31, 2016
    #22
    Because at the moment there's reasons to stay in the ecosystem for those already invested. But very few compelling ones to invest the cash to make the switch.
     
  23. Bigtyme07 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jun 19, 2016
    #23
    Other than the ones I mentioned in my original post? All I really want is reliability and everything working together as it should. It's all really subjective isn't it?
     
  24. Lihp8270 macrumors regular

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    Dec 31, 2016
    #24
    I am invested in the same way, MBP, iPad Pro, Watch, iPhone.

    Everything is reliable and does work together perfectly well. My point is that previously each product had good reasons to choose over alternatives. The only real one these days is that the ecosystem is better.

    So it's a case of whether the eco system alone is worth the money it costs. In my opinion it is, but my comment was more a general response to markfc
     
  25. zaaach48 macrumors regular

    zaaach48

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2016
    Location:
    Philadelphia
    #25
    Don't listen to these nay-sayers. They are just upset because they lost a couple of old ports. If you have done the research and you can do everything you need to on the Mac, then go for it! The important thing is to approach with an open mind and be willing to learn the OS, and not complain "this isn't how my PC was" every step of the way. But also don't expect 100% perfection just because the Mac cost a bit more, they can still have issues too.

    Personally I wouldn't bother with Parallels or boot camp, unless there is CAD software that will ONLY run on Windows, but it doesn't sound like the case. MS Office, including OneNote, is available for Mac without need to install Windows. I try to avoid anything Microsoft...
    --- Post Merged, Jan 26, 2017 ---
    Yes, it is all subjective....you may drive yourself mad having asked for opinions here lol
     

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