System eating disk space

Clodd1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 9, 2019
11
0
I just checked my storage and the system is taking up too much space, I got 250GB and the system took 117GB, I`ve received menseges to update and I wonder if the system has automatically downloaded these updates and are waiting for me to install. I don't know, but for me this is a lot space.
Captura de Tela 2019-02-13 às 14.10.04.png
 

Honza1

macrumors 6502
Nov 30, 2013
436
143
US
Do NOT do anything drastic - wait. This issue has been discussed up/down here (simple search would have show you many threads) and it seems to be mostly related to TimeMachine (even if you are NOT using it!) and local snapshots. OSX now seems to keep last ~24-48 hours of snapshots in local TimeMachine as backups always. Deleting a file does not release the space now... It just moves the file to trash, while keeping it in TimeMachine snapshot, and eventually, may be, even delete the file ;-) As long as you do not need the space, no reason not to keep the file around, just in case...
There are procedures how to delete snapshots using tmutils, but realistically, easiest may be just let it be - it will eventually be released on its own. I believe the general consensus is also, that if you need the space, system will (automatically) delete these backups on its own.
In other words, in Apple opinion, you are "overthinking it" and should just use the computer. It should get out of your way. That said, some reported over time, that they had problems with the space. The ways how to clean TM can easily find here by search or google it.
But you do not have a problem, so do not try to fix it (like deleting that folder from the other thread).
 
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Clodd1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 9, 2019
11
0
Do NOT do anything drastic - wait. This issue has been discussed up/down here (simple search would have show you many threads) and it seems to be mostly related to TimeMachine (even if you are NOT using it!) and local snapshots. OSX now seems to keep last ~24-48 hours of snapshots in local TimeMachine as backups always. Deleting a file does not release the space now... It just moves the file to trash, while keeping it in TimeMachine snapshot, and eventually, may be, even delete the file ;-) As long as you do not need the space, no reason not to keep the file around, just in case...
There are procedures how to delete snapshots using tmutils, but realistically, easiest may be just let it be - it will eventually be released on its own. I believe the general consensus is also, that if you need the space, system will (automatically) delete these backups on its own.
In other words, in Apple opinion, you are "overthinking it" and should just use the computer. It should get out of your way. That said, some reported over time, that they had problems with the space. The ways how to clean TM can easily find here by search or google it.
But you do not have a problem, so do not try to fix it (like deleting that folder from the other thread).

I think this is a huge problem, I got this computer last month, imagine how it will be in a year? I've put some files, like music, documents etc and it is less than 10GB, but as time goes I will need more and more space, 100GB is a lot space to just don't care.
 

Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
17,449
5,665
Do you use Time Machine?
If so, it's probably the "local backups" eating up your disk space.

My advice (and yes, I sound like a broken record):
STOP USING Time Machine.
Instead, use either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper.

No more wasted drive space on your Mac, and you'll have backups that won't continually "grow" ins size, and which will be instantly finder-mountable (and BOOTABLE) in a "moment of extreme need".
 

Howard2k

macrumors 68030
Mar 10, 2016
2,732
1,983
Do you use Time Machine?
If so, it's probably the "local backups" eating up your disk space.

My advice (and yes, I sound like a broken record):
STOP USING Time Machine.
Instead, use either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper.

No more wasted drive space on your Mac, and you'll have backups that won't continually "grow" ins size, and which will be instantly finder-mountable (and BOOTABLE) in a "moment of extreme need".

If he’s using Time Machine he likely just need to run a backup. I’d try that before knee-jerking to a third party solution.

It’s also worth clicking on the “Analyze” button (or whatever it’s called “Gerenciar...” and view the System allocation in there.
 

Janichsan

macrumors 68000
Oct 23, 2006
1,752
3,563
I think this is a huge problem, I got this computer last month, imagine how it will be in a year? I've put some files, like music, documents etc and it is less than 10GB, but as time goes I will need more and more space, 100GB is a lot space to just don't care.
Just wait. The system will clean up sooner or later and you will get the space back. What's more, the local backups get cleared at once when you really need the space.
 
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Blue Hawk

macrumors 6502a
Dec 18, 2017
709
323
Germany
I don’t really now if the graphic is telling you the truth. Mine says that photos are bigger than documents, but says that photos are in documents too. And doesn’t even show me how much the system takes.
 

Honza1

macrumors 6502
Nov 30, 2013
436
143
US
This graphics is really bad mistake by Apple. People keep overthinking it...
It may be "used" by system at this time, but it will be released and available if user needs it. So this graphics is confusing.
I believe to get better info do this: right click on the disk icon and select "Get info". Check value for "Available" and pay attention to "purgeable" value. The available is really free. The Purgeable is what is currently used by the system (that grey thing you complain about) but which will be released when you need it.
User can use the combined "Available" + "purgeable". These two numbers will oscillate during the life of the computer up and down, especially the purgeable value... and that is fine. People here have seen the available number go nearly to 0 when they did major data movements or system upgrades. Yet, it turned out to be NO problem as long as there was enough purgeable space. As system needed it, it purged it transparently.
 
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Janichsan

macrumors 68000
Oct 23, 2006
1,752
3,563
This graphics is really bad mistake by Apple. People keep overthinking it...
It may be "used" by system at this time, but it will be released and available if user needs it. So this graphics is confusing.
The whole way the Finder currently reports free disk space is confusing. People only see the free space massively going down for no apparent reason and get worried, like the OP did. That large parts of the allegedly occupied space is only transiently so isn't made clear in any way.