Tado Launches Smart AC Controller With HomeKit Support

Discussion in 'iOS Blog Discussion' started by MacRumors, May 21, 2019.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    Smart home company Tado has announced an updated version of its Smart AC Controller that includes Apple HomeKit support out of the box.

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    Available today in the U.K. and other European countries, the controller connects compatible air conditioners and heat pumps to a home's Wi-Fi network, allowing users to adjust the temperature with their mobile device rather than the remote control that came with their AC unit.

    The Tado device works by detecting the make and model of the AC unit from its infrared signal, and then mimics the signals that correspond to the user controls found on the original IR remote so that the Tado mobile app can take its place.

    The accompanying app has also been redesigned and introduces some new features, including an Air Comfort Skill which measures air freshness inside and outside of the home. The skill complements other features like Geofencing, Open Window Detection, Weather Adaptation, and energy reports that aim to save energy and improve comfort.

    Users can also make use of the Smart Schedule and settings to minimize AC noise levels and disruption by managing the fan speed and the time when it's running.

    With the new HomeKit support, users can ask Siri to change temperatures and add air conditioning into HomeKit Scenes and Automations. Like the company's V3+ Smart Thermostats, the new Smart AC Control also works with Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa.

    The new Smart AC Control V3+ is available starting today at £89.99 from retailers across Europe as well as from the tado.com website.

    Article Link: Tado Launches Smart AC Controller With HomeKit Support
     
  2. sirozha macrumors 6502a

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    #2
    These are the AC units popular in Europe and in Canada, but they are not the same as the ones used in the US.

    In the US, we control the AC units installed in the attic or in the basement with thermostats. Hence, the popularity of smart thermostats in the US. In Europe and Canada, they have dripless AC units mounted on the wall in each room, and the units are controlled with a small remote.

    This AC controller transforms HomeKit into a virtual thermostat with multi-zone control (whereby each room can be its own zone), which is impossible to achieve with most residential AC systems in the US because the same AC unit services the entire floor. Of course, most US population lives at latitudes that are much more southern, so the heat levels that we have to grapple with in most of the US are much higher to be handled by wall-mounted AC units.
     
  3. jacg macrumors 6502a

    jacg

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    #3
    It would be great if this would finally make my Samsung heat exchanger smart. Bought it thinking Samsung would bring something to market I could bolt on…
     
  4. incoherent_1 macrumors newbie

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    #4
    Please please bring this to Singapore — I’ve been hunting for this for months.

    I’m on the verge of homebrewing my own via a Raspberry Pi, an IR blaster, and HomeBridge to achieve this functionality, but having a fully-fledged product that doesn’t require hours to setup is much preferred! Homes don’t have central AC here like they do in North America.
     
  5. justperry macrumors G3

    justperry

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    #5

    Can't you just order online, plenty of stores here which will send it to you.
    I want *something I can only buy in Singapore/Malaysia, preferably MY (cheaper) but they won't send it to me.

    *Panasonic brushless ceiling fan, decent ceiling fans cost a fortune here.
    I can wait though, my Asian girl will be here within half a year.
     
  6. palev macrumors newbie

    palev

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    #6
    Not sure where you're getting your info regarding Canada from but most people I know have central air. The only other type I've seen here is "portable" ones for apartments etc.
     
  7. justperry macrumors G3

    justperry

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    #7
    What, that's just non sense, I lived in the tropics for over a decade, they work as well as a centralised system, the only drawback is it eats more juice, separate units are better if you don't need full house/apartment/whatever AC.
     
  8. NightFox macrumors 68020

    NightFox

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    #8
    I like my Tado central heating system, but the integration with Homekit isn't great (not sure if that's down to Apple or Tado) - Within a few day of (re)adding all my Tado devices to Home, they all show as "No Response". No great problem as I can just use the Tado app instead, but it's a step away from the single-app home automation that Home/Homekit was meant to offer.
     
  9. kis macrumors 68000

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    Switzerland
    #9
    Had the same problem - Switch out your network cable that goes to the Tado bridge and make sure the plug is tightly squeezed in (use tape if necessary). I had the same issue but after a while found out that the bridge’s RJ45 plug is pretty crappy and the plugged in cable often loses contact.
    --- Post Merged, May 21, 2019 ---
    Well, they promised HomeKit compatibility already with the V3 that came out years ago. Bought it for that back then and it never materialized. Kinda p****d now but will end up shedding out the 350 bucks for my 3 units anyway as I’m getting sick of homebridge. I just can’t seem to get that PoS working stable :-/
     
  10. justperry macrumors G3

    justperry

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    #10
    Is this AC only, or for heating too.
    I myself have a Nest as a controller, thought it could control AC as well, was wrong on that.
    Might get a Tado, has Homekit, the Nest doesn't, in fact, Google will mess it up in a couple of months, time to get of this Google crap.


    Bit off topic but related, some companies design their equipment with "special" RJ45 dimensions, hey Siemens are you reading, Siemens wants you to buy their overpriced crappy patch cables (big radius, bent them too far and they kink....), using others is not recommended....hahaha, the connection while using other branded cables is poor, seems like they don't fit snuggly.
    Doesn't stop there, like still selling flash cards for absurd prices.(Google that one, see for yourself)
    Those bastards.
    /rant
     
  11. SBlue1 macrumors 65816

    SBlue1

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    #11
    I was thinking about buying Tado, but with the new app you could only control it from within the home. Well then I can also just get up and do it by hand, no need to buy this expensive thing. If you wanted to make it smart like to use geofencing or using the app to set the temperature before leaving work you need to pay a yearly 25 Euros fee!! Thanks got I checked the negative comments on Amazon before buying this.
     
  12. sirozha macrumors 6502a

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    #12
    If you lived in the tropics, how is it possible that your house didn't need "full house" AC? Obviously, if your house was built without AC ducts, there is no other way to go but using the wall-mounted units.

    I know that in most places in Canada, the number of hot days per year is so few that it makes no sense to build houses with air-conditioning ducts. In the winter, they use more robust heating systems than a heat pump blowing lukewarm air, and in the summer, they don't need air-conditioning most of the time. When they do, they turn on wall-mounted units - if they ever bother to have those installed. Otherwise, they suffer for a few days each summer and save a bunch of money in the process.
     
  13. Binarymix macrumors 65816

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    #13

    Eh? No. Just no.

    We use Central Air, just like the US.

    In fact I’ve never seen a wall mounted AC unit in any of the provinces I’ve been in (most). I’m sure they exist but it’s not the norm.

    As for your Canadian temperature comment..... We hit mid to high 30’s for at least 3-4 months of the year, and mid to high 20’s for probably 2-3 months - in the central and southern regions, where most people live.

    Perhaps you are thinking of window mounted AC units, which are mainly used in older apartment buildings and older houses that haven’t been reno’d In the past 20 years.
     
  14. sirozha, May 22, 2019
    Last edited: May 22, 2019

    sirozha macrumors 6502a

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    It depends where in Canada you live. I spend summers in Quebec along the Saint Lawrence River, and no one builds houses there with central air. You can have one built like that if you want, but it adds tens of thousands of dollars to the price of the house. Most places don’t have air-conditioning at all. Those that do, have wall-mounted units. I’m sure in British Columbia most houses don’t have AC either. In the Maritime provinces, it rarely gets hot in the summer, and I’m sure central air is not common there either.

    In Ontario it gets hot, so I’m sure new houses are built with central air. Southern Ontario is a wine country with vineyards being a big chunk of agriculture. Obviously, the climate there is quite different from Eastern Quebec, British Columbia, or Maritime provinces.

    Last summer, it got extremely hot in Quebec for over two weeks (over 100F), and I couldn’t find an air conditioned place anywhere. Most shops had no air-conditioning. The chalet I rented had no air-conditioning. Public buildings like city halls had no air conditioning. Public schools had no air-conditioning. Hospitals had no air conditioning. In fact, there were dozens of deaths reported in Quebec last summer due to extreme heat that had not been recorded in a century. Even in Montreal, there was a hospital evacuated last July during the hot spell due to it not having any air conditioning at all.

    In Ottawa and Gatineau, QC, though, central air conditioning is much more common. Last summer, it was also extremely hot in Ottawa in July, and pretty much every business had central air conditioning. I'm sure the same is true for the Toronto area and the rest of southern Ontario.
     
  15. justperry macrumors G3

    justperry

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    #15
    Most of the tropic area is not rich, so few have central AC, even when they have the money they use standalone units.
     
  16. sirozha macrumors 6502a

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    #16
    That's a much better explanation. Additionally, in the tropics, rooms are much smaller, houses or apartments are much smaller, etc. Smaller rooms can be air-conditioned by standalone units much easier than much larger residences in the US.
     
  17. kis macrumors 68000

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    Switzerland
    #17
    In Europe most people use old fashioned per-room units. At least here in Switzerland this has a very specific reason: for central air you need planning permission (which is often refused, as city councils refuse installations that use a lot of electricity at once), for the regular split units you don’t need permission. While it would have been cheaper to put in central air here, we ended up getting per-room units for that reason. Also saves electricity, to be honest, as we only turn them on for the rooms we’re in at the moment.
     

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16 May 21, 2019