"Tapped" iPhone?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by IrQ22, Oct 15, 2016.

  1. IrQ22 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2016
    Location:
    Milky Way
    #1
    Hi

    Newbie here with a strange question.

    A girlfriend claims her ex has "tapped" her iPhone. This is the "2nd time" he has done so, yet he lives out of state.

    Is this possible?
     
  2. krazirob macrumors regular

    krazirob

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2016
    Location:
    Baltimore
    #2
    what do you mean by "tapped"? Did she use the same Apple ID she used when she was with him? Did she ever change her password? Did they share that same Apple ID at one time?

    Worse case just reset phone as new phone and create a new Apple ID.

    But again what do you mean by "tapped"? Is he saying he can read her texts and what not?
     
  3. Newtons Apple macrumors P6

    Newtons Apple

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    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
  4. fischersd macrumors 601

    fischersd

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2014
    Location:
    Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
    #5
    As above - reset with a new Apple ID - also enable two factor authentication - so if anyone tries to log onto that ID from a new browser / computer, you're notified.

    Or do you mean "phone tap" in the traditional sense, that he's able to listen to her conversations? (legally, that requires a court order for the authorities to do that...well...unless it's the feds and you're a suspected terrorist - PATRIOT act).
    If he's not in law enforcement or working at her wireless carrier (even so the people that have the knowledge and the access to do this are very few indeed), then I'd suggest she's being a little paranoid.
     
  5. Newtons Apple macrumors P6

    Newtons Apple

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #6
    Yep, agreed. He would have to get local law enforcement with a StingRay to intercept actual phone calls of have someone willing with the carrier. Resetting your phone and changing id is about the best you can do as you can not stop the carrier or StingRay.
     
  6. swordfish5736 macrumors 68000

    swordfish5736

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Location:
    Cesspool
    #7
    Creating a new Apple ID seems like a drastic measure. Coming up with a new password and enabling two-factor authentication should be enough to stop someone from logging into your account
     
  7. fischersd macrumors 601

    fischersd

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2014
    Location:
    Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
    #8
    Maybe - if he has access to the existing Apple ID, he could've already made the recovery e-mail and information what he knows, effectively locking her out. She would need to change all of this before the password to ensure he can't recover the ID once the password is changed. (and doing so could also notify him) - quick actions are required.
     
  8. swordfish5736 macrumors 68000

    swordfish5736

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Location:
    Cesspool
    #9
    So maybe suggesting to check these things first before possibly abandoning years of purchases instead of jumping to the most drastic step.
     
  9. IrQ22 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2016
    Location:
    Milky Way
    #10
    I believe she means he can read her texts and or see her recent calls

    She ditched her big iPhone (6 maybe) and got a new one. Second time she has done that.

    I don't believe it's possible

    Just wondering if she's paranoid or just plain nuts
     
  10. fischersd macrumors 601

    fischersd

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2014
    Location:
    Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
    #11
    If he has her Apple ID and password, yes, there's software products that let you spy on people. (call history, texts, maybe even e-mails). Here's one: http://www.webwatcher.com

    Have her change all of her recovery information for her Apple ID (security questions, recovery e-mail address, etc), then immediately change her password to one she's never used before (maybe you make it up for her). I think you may have to wait several days after changing the password before Apple will let you enable 2FA (remember them forcing me to change my password to a new one first, then there was a waiting period), but that, at least, should lock out this person.

    Ideally, do all of that from a system that the ex hasn't had access to (as key logging / spyware software could have been installed on her local computers when/if he had access).

    As to her mental health...you know her far better than anyone here. :)
     

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