Temperature Concerns for New Retina MPB

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by VitruviusMan, Jul 13, 2012.

  1. VitruviusMan macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    #1
    Hey everyone. I'm just going to admit outright that I am not knowledgeable when it comes to laptops in general. I've always been an off-the-shelf desktop kind of guy, so issues with temperatures have never really been a concern.

    I just had a few questions concerning the temperature of my rMBP:

    • When I game in Boot Camp, the machine gets really hot (almost uncomfortable to touch) near the bottom of the screen, above the function keys. Is this normal? Sometimes the heat will subside for the rest of the time I'm gaming.
    • If it's not normal, how can I keep temperatures low while I'm gaming?
    • Should I expect damage to my computer if I game at these temperatures for extended periods of time?

    Thanks!
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #2
    It's normal, and the heat will not harm your computer.
     
  3. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #3
    Yes, it's normal. No, it won't damage anything. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel) If you're not already using it, iStat Pro will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If they're spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  4. VitruviusMan thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    #4
    Thank you so much for the in-depth response! I can game at ease now thanks to you :D
     
  5. stevelam macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    #5
    heating electronics WILL do harm which is obviously why most modern mobile gpus have throttling when its overheated. the problem with windows bootcamp is that your machine will always be using the discrete card and has ****** power management which in turn will just produce more heat.

    if your actual keys are getting too hot to touch, that can't ever be a 'normal' thing.
     
  6. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #6
    This argument is a) irrelevant and b) tired. Go back through any number of the "Is my MBP too hot?" threads for previous responses. In short, exposing components to heat will have no noticeable effect over the typical lifespan of a personal computer ( < 10 years ).
     
  7. stevelam macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    #7
    yah lets also ignore the major overheating issues of past macbooks as well while we're at it. i guess thats just 'normal'. if it has no 'noticeable effect' then why bother putting the failsafe of completely shutting down a machine when it reaches certain temperatures?
     
  8. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #8
    It is certainly normal under high demand, such as when gaming. And the heat will not damage the system. While long-term exposure to high temps will shorten the life of any electronics, such reduction in lifespan will not be noticed by most users, as most will upgrade to a new computer long before any heat-related issues arise, provided no defect is involved.
     
  9. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #9
    The OP doesn't mention anything about his machine shutting down, indicating it is functioning as it was designed to. Not really sure what past machines' behavior has to do with anything - the failsafe shutdown is supposed to prevent damage from overheating. Overheating != heat within operational limits.
     

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