Testing with Vista

Discussion in 'Web Design and Development' started by tomoisyourgod, Nov 29, 2007.

  1. tomoisyourgod macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    Location:
    Liverpool, UK
    #1
    I have Windows XP and Linux dual booting on a PC for testing how web pages look with different browsers etc

    As Vista renders text like on OS X and Linux, does anyone know if effects webpage layouts in Firefox on Vista??

    I may need to purchase a copy of Vista for testing purposes.

    But as a web designer testing is important

    What do you guys do?
     
  2. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #2
    Well Vista uses IE7, which is available on XP as well so that should be good enough for testing. I have a machine with XP on it that I use to view my pages on occasion, but generally I don't care how it looks in IE. 80% of my visitors are on Mac, and only 12% is using IE. Life is good. Too bad my stats aren't anywhere close to average ... yet. :D

    Alternatively, people have listed sites that will do snapshots of your page and let you look at them. I don't know if they do Vista specific ones are not. I'd share some links, but I never used them myself so don't have them on hand, but you may be able to search for them on the forum.
     
  3. Photomax macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Location:
    Seattle
    #3
    I don't think its a good thing when anyone says "I don't care about browser XXXX." During the browser wars we had years of propriety code that informed viewers "that this site must be viewed with browser YYYYY." Today we have Modern Web Standards, who's corner stone principle is developing simple code that will work across ALL browsers and devices...

    Getting back to the original question: if you download IE7 it will overwrite IE6. IE6 is more important as it is a problem filled mess of a browser but still has a large user base. Mac web developers really need to test on IE6. There are ways of using multiple versions of IE on the same system. Its a big topic but Google "using multiple versions of Internet Explorer..."
     
  4. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #4
    Yes there are web standards, but unfortunately IE doesn't follow them very well, which is why I personally don't worry about it. I code to standards, not Microsoft. I wish browsers could keep up with the standards. Even Firefox and Safari have some distance to go, but at least they won't break your site when you're using most standards.

    For installing multiple versions of IE, see http://tredosoft.com/Multiple_IE It's what I use.
     
  5. plumbingandtech macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    #5
    HAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!

    Yes we have standards, and the "standards" don't work the same from browser to browser!!!!!


    Oh good one!!! :D thanks man!
     
  6. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #6
    IEs4OSX

    Someone posted this in the tips forum. Lets you run IE 5/5.5/6/7 Beta on OSX without Parallels or VMWare. Just takes Darwine (easy install) X11 (not as easy install). No Microsoft needed either. Runs OK, but screen refreshed were a bit ugly, but still has the same bugs as on Windows so works well to spot any web issues.

    http://www.kronenberg.org/ies4osx/
     
  7. radiantm3 macrumors 65816

    radiantm3

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2005
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #7
    You are better off keeping your original IE6 install, and installing the standalone version of IE7 (google 'standalone ie7'). IE 5.5 and below is practically dead these days. If they are still using 5.5 or below, they should not be on the internet.
     
  8. Photomax macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Location:
    Seattle
    #8
    Don't get me wrong, I hate IE6 as much as the next guy. I enjoyed learning Standards and CSS etc but dealing with IE6 was a nightmare.

    Bad browsers should be like milk: go past the expiration date and you have to pour it down the sink and get a fresh carton. Still, once you have covered all the IE issues and understand the way it interprets the box model & bugs you can design sites that will work in "good browsers" AND IE.

    Creating sites that ignore a particular browser is dumb: to reach the maximum audience a site should work on all "modern" browsers. Some years ago designers had to include complicated scripts to shield code from browser X or browser Y. Obviously Microsoft wanted to own the internet and hoped that IE would be the standard. Web Standards, while not perfect, at least directed us all away from that cliff edge.

    If there was no IE we could do a lot more: wild use of fixed background images, alpha transparency effects etc. The reality is that something like 60% of sites are viewed with some form of IE. As much as any Mac guy would love to ignore that, its there, like the elephant in the room.
     
  9. tomoisyourgod thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    Location:
    Liverpool, UK
    #9
    I have X11 installed as I need it to run Open Office (although, really I should use Neo Office!)

    Nevertheless, I've got it so I'll try this.

    Much appreciated angelwatt! :)
     
  10. SrWebDeveloper macrumors 68000

    SrWebDeveloper

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2007
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA, USA
    #10
    Angelwatts is 100% correct when stating "I code to standards".

    Of course that sentiment is commonly misinterpreted in two ways.

    First, some people think this means developers don't account for any differences and code rigidly to W3C onl. Secondly, others somehow think the developer only code rigidly to one proprietary standard, i.e. MSIE only since its the most common in terms of percentage usage.

    I have thoughts on both of these misconceptions.

    Even though it was pointed out that some browsers don't conform to W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) standards fully, it is up to the developer to research the slight variances and adjust code accordingly. This means fixing obvious incompatibilities that are well documented in the public domain, i.e. Javascript (event handlers, accessing ID names, etc.).

    And just because x% of users use browser X, never discount the other folks who don't. Specifically, don't code using prioprietary methods (i.e. Active X controls and don't rely on IFRAMES) for public sites. But that's perfectly fine if it's a controlled environment, such as a company Intranet.

    Bearing in mind no complex page will look exactly the same between all browsers, a good developer can get it close in basic functionality by researching and implementing adjustments which are well documented. It's the amateurs who don't know about the differences nor how to implement the if/then conditions or subtle coding changes effectively.

    But good, professional developers ALWAYS start by coding to DOM specifications FIRST, and then make the adjustments.

    -jim
     

Share This Page