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WeLikeVodka

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Feb 25, 2020
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The European Union is working on a new law that would force smartphone manufacturers to use replaceable batteries. Users should be able to replace the cell themselves at home. If such a regulation enters into force, the appearance of the devices can change drastically.

Over the years, manufacturers have become accustomed to the unsolvable shape of the smartphone. Only individual constructions have been left on the market with an opening flap giving access to a replaceable battery.

In the days of mobile phones, replaceable batteries were standard, but in the era of smartphones, design and the desire for profit have won. After all, it is possible to replace the battery, but only in the service, for an appropriate fee. And it's best if the user simply buys a new smartphone.

The main reason for the European Union's work on the new project is ecology, and specifically to reduce electro-waste, which is becoming a growing problem. Replacing the battery is to make us use smartphones longer.

It makes sense, because the life of smartphones is greatly extended. Once the smartphone slowed down after a year, and after two it could not be used. Today, it is not surprising that three- or even four-year devices are still in use and are doing well.

The only real problem with smartphones remained aging batteries. The link can be replaced on the website, but if it involves giving the smartphone for a long time, and with a fee of up to several hundred zlotys. It's no wonder that in such a situation, users are starting to consider buying a new smartphone.

When can the new law come into force?
We don't know that yet. The information comes from the leak, and Frans Timmermans, the vice-president of the European Commission and also the executive vice-president responsible for the European Green Deal, is expected to officially announce the project in mid-March. Then we will know the details.
 

oVerboost

macrumors 68000
Sep 17, 2013
1,561
1,036
United Kingdom
Back to the 90’s we go...

I’ve no idea if the article source is trusted, but I can’t see this happening any time soon.

Maybe not for other device manufacturers, but Apple’s battery replacement service is relatively well known about.
If the governments want people to keep their phones for longer, it’s often not the battery like they suggest, that make people upgrade/ buy the newest device.
 

JPack

macrumors G5
Mar 27, 2017
12,328
22,699
The biggest change would be Apple selling parts to end users.

Right now, battery replacement is a relatively easy procedure thanks to a great design. It's already 80% user replacable. The difficulty is getting an OEM part.
 
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44267547

Cancelled
Jul 12, 2016
37,643
42,524
The EU can ‘force’ all they want, it doesn’t mean it will be a reality. The challenge is, it’s a multifaceted process that requires probably passing a bill/referendum, and then you have opposing arguments from Apple (And other smart phone manufacturers) that will have a very long process of litigation. In short: I don’t think this will ever come to fruition.
 

The-Real-Deal82

macrumors P6
Jan 17, 2013
16,134
23,756
Wales, United Kingdom
The biggest change would be Apple selling parts to end users.

Right now, battery replacement is a relatively easy procedure thanks to a great design. It's already 80% user replacable. The difficulty is getting an OEM part.
I don’t know what other phones are like but the current iPhones look like a total nightmare for a consumer to attempt a battery replacement. Can you imagine the average joe heating a phone up to remove a screen, undoing about 20 tiny screws, removing logic boards and trying to get those adhesive pads off to remove a battery? I’d sooner chuck my phone in a river and claim on my insurance lol.
 

maerz001

macrumors 68020
Nov 2, 2010
2,351
2,241
The biggest change would be Apple selling parts to end users.

Right now, battery replacement is a relatively easy procedure thanks to a great design. It's already 80% user replacable. The difficulty is getting an OEM part.

Wait a minute. U are talking about great design and 80% replaceable? Great design would be to do it like in a torchlight. Unscrew a water sealed cap and slide out the battery.

There is no intention of the average consumer to replace the battery in an iphone because its a pain in the ass to do.

Some tech savvy people are willing to take the risk. But still its a tough game of not killing ribbon cables and no way of reapply the water seals.
 

JPack

macrumors G5
Mar 27, 2017
12,328
22,699
I don’t know what other phones are like but the current iPhones look like a total nightmare for a consumer to attempt a battery replacement. Can you imagine the average joe heating a phone up to remove a screen, undoing about 20 tiny screws, removing logic boards and trying to get those adhesive pads off to remove a battery? I’d sooner chuck my phone in a river and claim on my insurance lol.
Wait a minute. U are talking about great design and 80% replaceable? Great design would be to do it like in a torchlight. Unscrew a water sealed cap and slide out the battery.

There is no intention of the average consumer to replace the battery in an iphone because its a pain in the ass to do.

Some tech savvy people are willing to take the risk. But still its a tough game of not killing ribbon cables and no way of reapply the water seals.

There is certainly room for improvement, like having pull tabs on the front of the battery, similar to OnePlus 5 and Pixel. The battery connector should also be prioritized to make it easier to access the battery.

But I think the clamshell design of the iPhone makes battery replacement at least viable for many consumers. Other smartphones require heat as the first step in order to remove the glass back and to gain access to the battery.
 

The-Real-Deal82

macrumors P6
Jan 17, 2013
16,134
23,756
Wales, United Kingdom
There is certainly room for improvement, like having pull tabs on the front of the battery, similar to OnePlus 5 and Pixel. The battery connector should also be prioritized to make it easier to access the battery.

But I think the clamshell design of the iPhone makes battery replacement at least viable for many consumers. Other smartphones require heat as the first step in order to remove the glass back and to gain access to the battery.

I’ve watched quite a few of the videos posted by Hugh Jefferies on YouTube and that guy seems to have a photographic memory for taking electronics apart. Having seen him strip iPhones, even he says Apple have made it more difficult for third party repair shops to perform repairs. Replacing anything on these devices seems to require a lot of skill and is not something I would ever attempt and i’m a mechanical engineer lol. The adhesive battery tabs require a lot of force to remove and if they break as Jefferies warns, you could be in a lot of trouble. The MacBooks are the worst with components glued in place.
 
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