The future of OS's looks terrible?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by ThirtyThr33, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. ThirtyThr33 macrumors 6502

    ThirtyThr33

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    #1
    I read an article on Cultofmac.com that talked about how Apple is slowly trying to make Mac OS X and iOS one with each other, this can be seen subtly by the iOS features being added into Lion. Windows 8 also looks more like a cellphone platform than a computer OS if you guys have seen the early videos of it's concept design.

    I am very unhappy with the way things are moving. I mean I can't say for sure how I will feel about future OS's but the idea of it from the present time line sounds so stupid. Don't get me wrong, I love iPhones, iPads, and iPods, but I hate to see Apple and MS move to such a simple future. It's almost like a "no brain required" future where nothing exists but scrolling pages and flashy icons.

    What do you guys think?
     
  2. gorskiegangsta macrumors 65816

    gorskiegangsta

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    #2
    Well, people initially thought that GUI would ruin the MS-DOS :D

    Seriously though, I am also ticked off by a few iOSsy additions to Lion (namely Launchpad and "natural" scrolling) that I believe are useless and do not work well on desktop/laptop devices. However, there's no reason why desktop operating systems shouldn't be able to benefit from innovations of mobile OSes. That's not to say that OS X should become iOS (or that Windows should become... whatever Microsoft is doing in the mobile space), that would be neither practical nor useful.
     
  3. jamisonbaines macrumors regular

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    #3
    Yeah, it feels dumbed down. I'd rather use keyboard shortcuts than a bunch of random gestures.

    The gimmicky features are probably great for the people who use a computer as a way to watch a movie and check their facebook but they don't do much for upping productivity for the people who use them for work.
     
  4. mystik610 macrumors regular

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    Jul 23, 2011
    #4
    If they can manage to simplify the interface while keeping it just as powerful/capable, I'm all for it.

    Not sure why simplifying an OS and making things more accessible is necessarily a bad thing...if software developers didn't strive to simplify things for users, we'd still be typing in command prompts! I think a lot of people are resistant to change and fail to see how new ways of interacting and navigating an OS can enrich the experience rather than hinder it. Touch screens, track pads, etc offer a lot in terms of how we interact with our systems now. It would be a shame if desktop OS makers didn't embrace it.

    Lion is a step in the right direction IMO...the gestures didn't take anything away from OSX...rather they made the experience far more intuitive and natural.

    Windows 8 looks like it could be great too. Its a very big departure from Windows as we know it now, but its good to see Microsoft trying to innovate again. For those who will probably need the core windows experience (myself included), it will still exist within windows 8.
     
  5. gorskiegangsta macrumors 65816

    gorskiegangsta

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    #5
    I, personally find gestures to be easier, more natural, and overall a better way of interaction than remembering a key combination. With a trackpad by likes of Macbook Pro, there's always room for improvement on the gesture side.
     
  6. ThirtyThr33 thread starter macrumors 6502

    ThirtyThr33

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    #6
    Eh, I think windows 8 looks like TOO BIG of a step in the simplification process. At least through Lion they seem to be slowly getting us primed for the iOS OS but windows 8 looks like a dive straight into the deep end (which could be great if they pull it off flawlessly, but such an extreme change would need to be PERFECTLY played out) and MS isn't too savvy with such feats as of late
     
  7. Macsavvytech macrumors 6502a

    Macsavvytech

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    #7
    Sure, if you work from a trackpad. Problem is most professional programmers etc work over dual monitors or with a mouse and keyboard and are a long way from a track pad. I think this is why Apple added the magic trackpad, however when you can touch type using keyboard shortcuts are much quicker then trackpad gestures.
    The only thing that really bothers meare cloud OSes, that is a long way into the future but it is rumoured they are already in construction and just waiting for the technology to catch app... I don't like the idea of everything I do being stored on an external computer. Data sure but I would prefer to keep the OS local.
     
  8. admanimal macrumors 68040

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    #8
    Huh? I know tons of professional programmers who use trackpads. In fact many use laptops (i.e. Macbooks of some kind) as their primary programming machine.

    Graphic designers and artists might need a mouse for precision, but other than that trackpads work just as well if not better for most people.
     
  9. jamisonbaines macrumors regular

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    #9
    Maybe I'm in the minority not liking the focus on gestures then. I like my iPhone and I use a Magic Trackpad with my desktop but my hands rest on the keyboard.

    I page down with the spacebar over petting the trackpad. I switch applications with cmd tab over three finger swipes and expose/whatever it is now, I open applications using the dock or spotlight over launchpad, I go back in Safari with cmd arrow keys over whatever the gesture is, I scroll through photos with arrow keys over gestures. You get the idea.

    I do use hot corners and I like three finger moving of windows. That's about it so far.
     
  10. mystik610 macrumors regular

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    Jul 23, 2011
    #10
    Microsoft actually did a really good job with Windows Phone 7 and was very well received by the media. I actually used a Windows Phone 7 device for about 6 months before getting the iPhone 4, and was thoroughly impressed by it. I was running it on a device that was not Windows Phone 7 native (hacked HTC HD2) and it was as smooth, if not smoother, than iOS. Plus the integration of services and data onto the home screen and the various hubs makes iOS's dated system of notification badges and page after page of icons look a little antiquated. (I realize that iOS 5 will change a lot of that).

    Windows Phone 7 receives high praise from reviewers, however, Windows Phone 7 entered the market too late, with iOS dominating the field and Android not too far behind. A few key features were missing at launch (as was the case with the first iteration of iOS and Android), but in terms of the software itself, they did a really good job.

    Windows Phone 7 was not received well by the market because their reputation was tainted by years of of their lack of innovation with Windows Mobile and their blunder with Vista, which is ultimately holding them back. Which is why its refreshing to see them take some risks with Windows 8. I think if Windows 8 has the same level of polish as Windows Phone 7, it has the potential to be great. And they aren't abandoning the 'legacy' approach to Windows entirely....in fact it will exist within Windows 8, and I'm sure you'll be able to disable the new UI and work entirely in the old system if need be.

    They also did a really good job with Windows 7, which is well received by the media and users. It's quietly replacing XP as the standard Windows OS.

    The interesting thing about PC users is as much as they complain about how antiquated MS products tend to be, they are extremely resistant to change. Look at the uproar that occurred when Windows XP first hit the market....or Office 2007. People hated them because they were too far a departure from what people were used to...and many complained that they were over simplifying the interface. But as people started to familiarize themselves with the updates, the changes they made started to make sense, and these became the industry standard.
     
  11. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #11
    I'm not pleased with the direction apple is taking OSX. I can see them hiding the file system all together in a future release. Having the OS choose where to store documents and what not. We already see glimpses of this with versions.

    I prefer a mouse with my Macs so gestures is not for me and the reverse scrolling is not a good idea. I'm on multiple platforms and having apple do their own thing just makes life difficult.

    Launchpad is useless as there's more efficient ways to start an app.

    My options are limited, switch back to windows or linux. Stick with Snow Leopard or suck it up and embrace Lion.

    For now, I'm choosing option #2 but if I buy a new mac, I'll be forced to use windows or Lion. I'll burn that bridge when I get to it however. My MBP has plenty of life left in it
     
  12. Macsavvytech macrumors 6502a

    Macsavvytech

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    #12
    You didn't catch my point.
    if your run two monitors then in my experience and many others is that you can't use your inbuilt trackpad easily! That's was why I mentioned the magic trackpad, it is a successful way of having a trackpad in a dual monitor setup. Also as I mentioned for touch typers (or atleast )me I can press a keyboard shortcut quicker then a trackpad gesture.
     

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