The Hackintosh Thread

MacUser2525

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Mar 17, 2007
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Update: Just as I suspected, the Ethernet is working OOB! Thank you!

it is Realtek 8168, btw.

But I have another strange problem. Upon booting, there is black screen. I have to wait for it to go to sleep automatically, so that then I can wake it up, and then it works. After that, I can put it to sleep and wake up as many times as I want, and it never goes back to black screen. The only problem is the first boot.

The GPU in question is Radeon RX 580.
Seems strange indeed, I have a 2gb rx560 in mine and it works flawlessly with all three monitors I have connected. Have you tried turning on the screen or file sharing and seeing if you can log into the machine via those? Also what kind of connection used? Have you tried different cables or port used?
 

StellarVixen

macrumors 68020
Mar 1, 2018
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Earth
Seems strange indeed, I have a 2gb rx560 in mine and it works flawlessly with all three monitors I have connected. Have you tried turning on the screen or file sharing and seeing if you can log into the machine via those? Also what kind of connection used? Have you tried different cables or port used?
I am using HDMI. I didn’t try what you suggested, as there is no need to, I just need to wait for Mac OS to go to sleep. Then, when I wake it up, it works normally. This way I can log in.

Monitor attached to this machine is older one. It has HDMI and DVI inputs. So, the only other option I have is DVI. I didn’t try that.

I do not even need to bother that much, as I can make it to work the way I described. It is just...strange. I just wanted to know why it does that.
 

MacUser2525

macrumors 68000
Mar 17, 2007
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I am using HDMI. I didn’t try what you suggested, as there is no need to, I just need to wait for Mac OS to go to sleep. Then, when I wake it up, it works normally. This way I can log in.

Monitor attached to this machine is older one. It has HDMI and DVI inputs. So, the only other option I have is DVI. I didn’t try that.

I do not even need to bother that much, as I can make it to work the way I described. It is just...strange. I just wanted to know why it does that.
No clue, if I connect the monitor next to my machine via DVI at least my computer will not even boot. Press the power and you get nothing it will attempt to start but dies, that is the strangest one I have ever seen. Computers do weird stuff.
 

dfritchie

macrumors regular
Jan 28, 2015
166
54
Some are, I'm not although a Threadripper powered Mac Pro would be awesome! The main problem I see is everytime the OS gets an update you have to repatch the kernel. And the patches change with every update it seems. A little leary about hacking the kernel all the time. With Intel you pretty much update like a real Mac.
 

sk8andmetal

macrumors regular
i am more and more tempted to replace a high end rig for a budget ( compared to Mac Pro prices).
However I have few concerns about the setup, noise and such, so my question is anyone here have a rig that match with current apple standard in terms of noise / vibration ?
thanks
 

Flint Ironstag

macrumors 65816
Dec 1, 2013
1,088
589
Houston, TX USA
Hmmm... last PC I built was a Tyan Thunderbolt with dual PIII 1GHz slot CPUs! Can anyone recommend a barebones vendor? Someplace I can order a specific motherboard, case, and power supply combo already assembled and tested.

Im weighing my options for more Z series workstations or going with a golden build 390 or C621 chipset. I don't need bleeding edge CPU performance, just enough to feed a bunch of GPUs (minimum 3 GPUs per box).

Thanks in advance! Can't believe I'm actually having to do this. Once I heard the 7,1 was $6k base...
 

Loki.Mephisto

macrumors 6502a
if left the hackintosh world for 3yrs and using linux, now i'm back with my old Mac mini Server (Mid 2011) and upgraded to High Sierra but very interested with new AMD processor and i believe OSX still unable to installed in AMD
No, you actually can install macOS on AMD - based systems. Caveat is there is no update path; so each time Apple issues an update you have to install from scratch. At least that's my understanding of the current status
 

robbieduncan

Moderator emeritus
Jul 24, 2002
24,646
63
Harrogate
Hi! I have a Hackintosh now! I built it with an NVidia card as that seemed like the best idea at the time. Now to upgrade past High Sierra I seem to need an AMD card. I have 2 4K screens so need 2 x display port (or mini DP). Any reccomendations?
 
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Flint Ironstag

macrumors 65816
Dec 1, 2013
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Houston, TX USA
Hi! I have a Hackintosh now! I built it with an NVidia card as that seemed like the best idea at the time. Now to upgrade past High Sierra I seem to need an AMD card. I have 2 4K screens so need 2 x display port (or mini DP). Any reccomendations?
Did you do a writeup of your build anywhere? I think used Vega 56 or 64 is what I'd consider.
 

robbieduncan

Moderator emeritus
Jul 24, 2002
24,646
63
Harrogate
Did you do a writeup of your build anywhere? I think used Vega 56 or 64 is what I'd consider.
No, it’s a couple of years old now. Intel i5 on a micro ATX board in a Fractal Design Node 202 case. Real Apple Wifi card on an adaptor board so handoff etc all works. 16Gb of RAM. 512Gb Samsung EVO NVMe SSD. 3Gb GeForce card. 2 Dell S2817Q screens.

It works amazingly well to be honest. The screens are not great for colour accuracy but as an office type machine (it’s used mostly for me to work from home) they are fine.
 
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LeeW

macrumors 65816
Feb 5, 2017
1,053
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Glasgow, Scotland
Are there any 'ready to go' Hackintosh devices out there, like a Nuc or something? Interested in having a play about with a Hackintosh but want to get something that is known to 'just work' as a first step.
 

StellarVixen

macrumors 68020
Mar 1, 2018
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Earth
Are there any 'ready to go' Hackintosh devices out there, like a Nuc or something? Interested in having a play about with a Hackintosh but want to get something that is known to 'just work' as a first step.
If you want something that "just works" you have to assemble it yourself, with carefully picked parts that are known to work on Mac OS.


Prebuilt things (like laptops and mini PCs) are rarely working 100 percent OOB.

My desktop has everything working, after I did extensive research on what works and what not. RX 580 won't work with HDMI, only DP, but that is known fault that affects even Mac Pros with Polaris GPUs, so not Hackintosh related.
 

StellarVixen

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Mar 1, 2018
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Here I guess?


I am ok with this, used to building PC's so not phased by it, will pick out something small to start and see what happens :)
I suggest you visit reddit Hackintosh sub, and use vanilla method, it is harder that way, but worthy in the end.


But that page has good recommendations. However, it is not set in stone, you can maybe assemble something better if you have better idea.


EDIT: here's Vanilla method

 
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StellarVixen

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All in all, it has been fun this hackintosh experiment. It's not for everyone, that is sure.

But I am still gonna get real Mac next year...it's just easier and you have peace of mind.


I will keep this hackintosh, however. I am probably gonna get this rumored 16 inch MBP, and keep this desktop at home.
 

StellarVixen

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Just upgraded to Catalina. Works like a charm.


Had problems with audio, AppleALC caused kernel panic on wake up from sleep (some conflict with AppleHDA kext).

Applied kernel patch, everything works well now.
 
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dazlicous

macrumors 6502a
Jun 2, 2011
953
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Manchester
just built a new pc wouldn’t mind doing a Hackintosh on a second drive if it’s suitable spec wise and compatible

i9
Gigabyte Aorus Master Z390 MB
32GB ram
GForce 2060 super GFX
 

MacUser2525

macrumors 68000
Mar 17, 2007
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Canada
just built a new pc wouldn’t mind doing a Hackintosh on a second drive if it’s suitable spec wise and compatible

i9
Gigabyte Aorus Master Z390 MB
32GB ram
GForce 2060 super GFX
Appears there is a guide for your use, I found it by using your motherboard name and adding hackintosh to it in Google.


 
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StellarVixen

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Screen Shot 2019-10-30 at 11.27.04 AM.png


Who is the guy who wrote this? I want to meet him in person.
- - Post merged: - -

Seems strange indeed, I have a 2gb rx560 in mine and it works flawlessly with all three monitors I have connected. Have you tried turning on the screen or file sharing and seeing if you can log into the machine via those? Also what kind of connection used? Have you tried different cables or port used?
I did "InjectATI", set FB to "Orinoco", and set number of ports to 5.


Now it is working, no more booting to black screen, and not having to sleep and then wake up for HDMI to work.

DVI still doesn't work, but that is irrelevant in 2019.
 
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MacCheetah3

macrumors 6502
Nov 14, 2003
447
37
Sauk Rapids, MN
I know this is a beginner/noob inquiry, but I'm curious from those who've done a lot on this topic.

Background:

I have a seven-year-old Mac and even though it's doing okay, not great but sufficient, I feel I'm nearing an upgrade point. I do occasional small/medium graphics work, occasional video conversions, typical Web, email and so forth tasks, but also will be getting into software development (iOS, maybe Apple TV and macOS, plus Android, though that will probably be on a different machine).

Closing in on the point:

I've been looking at the new Mac mini and MacBook Pro 16" and the configs I feel most comfortable with investing would cost about $2,300 - $3,000. With this price tag, I have looked into custom PC builds -- which I've done in the past having Windows OS -- or a Hackintosh Razor Blade Stealth.

To the point:

I've looked over guides and other resources for assembling a Hackintosh, but they seem very tedious, clumsy and no guarantees. I'm not opposed to putting in time and effort, though there's an extent that's not worthwhile. So, then I thought, "Maybe I could simply create a mac VM on my Windows 10 laptop." Well, from my first attempt, it doesn't seem any less cumbersome than what I've read for the actual Hackintosh -- not extremely surprising, although, a little because it's interpolated hardware.

I don't use Windows as the main OS in part because I don't want to do half a dozen steps and endless troubleshooting to make hardware or software function as intended.

THE QUESTION:

Is a Hackintosh (in any form) truly worthwhile or is the financial cost savings just transformed into extraneous work, i.e., ends up being a wash or loss eventually anyway?
 
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NOTNlCE

macrumors 6502a
Oct 11, 2013
991
178
Baltimore, MD
Is a Hackintosh (in any form) truly worthwhile or is the financial cost savings just transformed into extraneous work, i.e., ends up being a wash or loss eventually anyway?
I think you're gonna find this incredibly subjective depending on who you ask. I've been doing this stuff for years and wouldn't move back to Apple hardware simply because I'm not a fan of what they've moved toward in the company. (Low repairability, soldered SSDs, Butterfly keyboard, etc.) I use exclusively hacks on a daily basis, but they do require upkeep and a great deal of time and investment to get them running, but once they're running smooth, typically they're solid.

One thing you will find is that laptops are often much more difficult to get running well than custom built desktops. I personally replaced my 2011 15" MBP with an XPS 15 a few years ago and it's been the best "MacBook" I've ever owned. Sure, it has its quirks and it's taken me a huge amount of tweaking to get it where it is now as far as stability, but if you're up for that challenge (and annoyance) then it can be rewarding.

To answer your question, it depends. For SURE the financial savings are converted into extraneous work, but I wouldn't call it a wash. The tower in my signature has been running since 2014 (and has been upgraded along the way!) and to have a 6~ year old machine that outperforms even the newest Macs that I can continue to upgrade and tweak is worth the extra work, for ME. You'll probably have to ask yourself what your time is worth. Maybe pick up something cheap and used that's known to work (like those HP ProDesk towers people often post in hack forums) and get your bearings on that in your spare time before you shell out for a new computer. It's certainly not a "set it and forget it" kind of deal. There will constantly be updates and improvements to keep up with and bugs to work out, but if you're in for the long haul, willing to read, learn, read some more, test, get frustrated, take a break, come back and try it again tomorrow, it certainly can be worth it.

Hope that helps!