The Programmer Hierarchy

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by yeroen, Dec 16, 2007.

  1. yeroen macrumors 6502a

    yeroen

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    Cambridge, MA
    #1
    With all the lines drawn in the sand on this board lately over which language is best and most relevant, and which ones are for squares only, I present the programmer hierarchy chart. The comment about Ruby is spot on, but do VB "programmers" really think they're better than those who develop in Ada?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. iSee macrumors 68040

    iSee

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    Oct 25, 2004
    #2
    LOL! This is pretty good. Though, of course, it needs even more lines and arrows.
     
  3. maxvamp macrumors 6502a

    maxvamp

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    #3
    Observation...

    I know VB programmers that think they are above C++ programmers. Sadly they do not know any better.

    In all honesty though, I would move either JAVA up above VB, or move VB doen between JAVA and HTML scripting.

    Max.
     
  4. toddburch macrumors 6502a

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    Katy, Texas
    #4
    This is pretty funny. I am one who codes in Ruby, but not the Rails stuff - that chart is OBVIOUSLY referring to the Rails community. :p

    Overriding this chart, should be another, illustrating the sentiment that a programmer on platform A has for another programmer on platform B.

    For my day job, I code on the latest (and the oldest) IBM mainframes on the market. Big iron, as they call it. Exclusively in assembler. Where would I end up on the charts?? I know the sentiment of the mainframe crowd, but what's the non-mainframe crowd think of the mainframe? I've heard both high regard and sympathy.

    Todd
     
  5. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

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    #5
    Funny.

    XML is a programming languauge ;)
     
  6. yeroen thread starter macrumors 6502a

    yeroen

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    #6
    Whoever designed this graph originally must have had some interesting anecdotes about the VB squad...I'm otherwise at a loss to account for their self-regard.

    I suppose the position of Ada developers reflects their bitterness at their indefinite internment within the aerospace/defense industry, where their rare skills render them too valuable to ever be promoted out of programming.
     
  7. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

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    #7
    lame. :rolleyes:

    Not because I do Java (for a living), but because of the energy wasted in ranking programmers by language rather than by skill.
     
  8. iSee macrumors 68040

    iSee

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    #8
    Er, that's kind of the point: It's a joke poking fun at programmers who consider themselves superior to other programmers based on language (as opposed to some other, hopefully better criteria--like sense of humor ;) ).
     
  9. Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

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    #9
    Programmers have a sense of humour? :D
     
  10. tjwett macrumors 68000

    tjwett

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  11. Catfish_Man macrumors 68030

    Catfish_Man

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    #11

    Rightfully so!
     
  12. kainjow Moderator emeritus

    kainjow

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    Jun 15, 2000
    #12
    I wonder where REALbasic users put themselves :)
     
  13. demallien macrumors regular

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    Oct 13, 2005
    #13
    I'm with Todd - C and assembly language by day, Ruby by night. Actually, it's a bit funny to see the comment about ruby programmers on a Mac website, seeing as we've just been elevated to near first-class programming citizens on the mac, with RubyCocoa being officially included in Leopard.

    I wrote my first graphical app EVER for a Mac last weekend. All Ruby, all of the time (well, except for the 99% of the time that the app was busy doing Cocoa stuff ;-) )

    Actually, I also use Ruby at work - at the moment I'm writing a C-code parser/analyser, which generates assembly code glue to pass between a virtual machine and a real CPU. All of the high-end logic is done in Ruby, even if the low-end parsing is done in C... Fun, but I note that that app also has exactly 0 to do with the web...

    Oh, I should mention that, with the exception of app programming on the Mac, the Ruby comment was pretty much spot on :)
     
  14. pilotError macrumors 68020

    pilotError

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    Long Island
    #14
    Funny!

    I played with Lisp many moons ago and always wondered if it was a language for Masochists! LOL

    It was pretty cool, but I couldn't find any practical use for it other than my AI courses...
     
  15. yeroen thread starter macrumors 6502a

    yeroen

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    #15

    Well, like Todd said, those who suffer the most from delusions of grandeur are the Rails subset of Ruby programmers.

    Be thankful you're using Ruby at work and not something like Yacc (I have to use Yacc :( )

    I want to to learn Haskell next, whose only side effect will be to engender a feeling of dominance over Lisp programmers *cough cough*
     
  16. demallien macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    #16
    But I do use yacc, or at least bison. That's what generates the C code. I think build a wrapper class around that the provides an interface for a Ruby class called "Parser". The Ruby code does most of the high-level analysis (recursing through declaration trees of structs etc), and generates the glue code, which is a mix of C and assembley.

    Actually, there's a Ruby version of yacc floating around. I think it's called (oddly enough) racc. But considering the ease with which you can mix C and Ruby code, I really don't see any interest in taking the performance hit....

    Anyway, you forgot the most important part of the hierachy - Me!

    Demallien -> Considers herself superior to....

    :)
     
  17. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    Jan 5, 2006
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    Redondo Beach, California
    #17
    I used to acually had a Symbolics List Machine in my office. What was good about Lisp was that first you coded up a pile of new functions, called that set of functions a "new language" (like say, "Prolog") and then you went about solving your problem using a language that was exactly suited to the problem at hand. Made for very clear and clean designs. And if you just happened to have your List interpreter implemented in hardware it runs fast enough.

    The better editors took care of all those damn parens. They even let you collapse parts of the code o you could edit the larger file structure all on one screen. Has a great system but expensive and not many people wanted a computer that could run only one language.
     
  18. pilotError macrumors 68020

    pilotError

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    #18
    If the bean counters only realized that...

    although...

    Hiring code monkeys keeps me in business... I'm always fixing their code!

    I guess you can call me a code monkey business picker upper!
     
  19. wightstraker macrumors regular

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    Dec 18, 2007
    #19
    Functional languages are fantastic, but it's true, LISP is a little cruel. You should take a look at Scheme - much friendlier.
     
  20. macDonalds macrumors 6502

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    Jun 8, 2007
    #20
    As a VB developer I would put myself above PHP :)

    I wouldn't mess with Assembly, C/C++ and LISP.
     
  21. pilotError macrumors 68020

    pilotError

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  22. yeroen thread starter macrumors 6502a

    yeroen

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    #22
    Does Office for Mac 2004 include a VBA interpreter? I never bothered to check.
     
  23. toddburch macrumors 6502a

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    #23
    I believe it does. I was writing some Ruby to automate Excel here a while back, and the "VBA" text I was referencing to figure out the programming model discussed some differences between Windows Office and the Mac version.

    Todd
     
  24. Loge macrumors 68020

    Loge

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    England
    #24
    No mention yet of my favourite language - APL.
     
  25. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

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    Location:
    Cold beer land
    #25
    First thought was "whoa ..."
    Then I checked, it's still around! I used that in the early to mid eighties.
     

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