The Seemingly Official "If it ran on Windows" thread

zap2

macrumors 604
Mar 8, 2005
7,241
1
Washington D.C
dornoforpyros said:
*TAKE THIS POST WITH A GRAIN OF SALT*

I suppose posting pictures of the World Trade Centre would be in bad taste eh? :rolleyes:

ya someone would get pissed:rolleyes: i guess that means no mocking people from religion... because we know what happens cartoonist that do that:eek:
 

xPismo

macrumors 6502a
Nov 21, 2005
675
0
California.
sushi said:
...I might add:
:eek: :eek: OMG WOW! That attatched image of the Thunderbird ejecting before stuffing it is awesome! I've seen the video - but never knew there was still shots of the event.

Boy, I wonder which photographer got that one. Lucky bastard.

/this may replace my current desktop/


wow again.
 

sushi

Moderator emeritus
Jul 19, 2002
15,658
3
キャンプスワ&#
xPismo said:
:eek: :eek: OMG WOW! That attatched image of the Thunderbird ejecting before stuffing it is awesome! I've seen the video - but never knew there was still shots of the event.

Boy, I wonder which photographer got that one. Lucky bastard.

/this may replace my current desktop/


wow again.
You might find this interesting:

"AVweb has confirmed that the image last Thursday posted to our Picture Of The Week section of Capt. Christopher Stricklin's Sept. 14, 2003, ejection from Thunderbirds jet number 6 -- roughly eight-tenths of a second before aircraft impact -- is in fact authentic. It was shot by Staff Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III, Still Photographer, U.S. Air Force, from the catwalk atop the tower at Mountain Home AFB, and was not officially released by the Air Force until last Friday afternoon.

For the photographically inclined, Staff Sgt. Davis said he shot images with a Nikon DX1 camera using a 300-mm lens with an aperture setting of 2.8 and shutter speeds of 1/1000 and 1/2000. For the now famous (and now official) shot, Davis "waited for the aircraft to level and clicked the shutter." And yes, he did experience some concern that the jet, which the Air Force says Stricklin turned away from the crowd, appeared instead to be directed at the tower. By his own account, the wreckage stopped just 100 feet shy of the tower's base."