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rkuo

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 25, 2010
1,300
937
So, outside of the "serious work" debate, I've found the iPad to be useful in really creative ways that a Macbook just wouldn't be suitable for. On a small road trip, I used my iPad Pro 11" M1 to do the following.

1. Be a TV/Entertainment machine in the car (headrest mount for the backseat viewers). Subscribing to cellular on it makes it even more seamless.
2. A coloring book in conjunction with the Apple Pencil ... a favorite for the kid at restaurants!
3. A night light for the hotel room that didn't have any dimmers. Kept us from bumping our feet at night and the kid from being scared because it was pitch black.

I'm impressed with the ways in which it made our trip easier!
 

mandopicker101

macrumors member
Mar 21, 2022
70
55
I believe outside of some loud Internet forums and sites that insist that the iPad is useless because it doesn’t act how they insist it must, most actual iPad users love the things.
Indeed. Working on the periphery of tech, I’ve found most people when they’re happy with something don’t often feel the need to scream about it. They’re just using the device or service contentedly and getting on. Those who feel they’ve been hard done to - my iPad isn’t a Mac! Do it Timmy, do it now! - are by far the most vocal.
 

MacDevil7334

Contributor
Oct 15, 2011
2,535
5,750
Austin TX
I believe outside of some loud Internet forums and sites that insist that the iPad is useless because it doesn’t act how they insist it must, most actual iPad users love the things.
It’s not just because the iPad doesn’t act as some users “insist it must”. It’s also because it doesn’t behave in the way Apple advertises it. Apple pushes the iPad Pro partially as a laptop replacement (your next computer isn’t a computer), a portable productivity powerhouse. Apple puts hardware that exceeds the specs of some Macs and charges prices that exceed that of some Macs.

But then there are all these software limitations that prevent the iPad from doing basic things Macs have been able to do for decades. Want to have more than 4 windows open at a time? No can do. Are you a pro that uses Final Cut? You literally can’t leave the app during an export without cancelling it.

These sorts of limitations are all results of the fact that iOS (yes, it’s still iOS despite the rebranding a few years ago) is a phone OS designed around aggressively protecting very scarce system resources. These limitations were understandable back when the iPad was a $500 device running on a phone processor with 256 MB of RAM. But now it’s a $1000-$2000 device with specs that exceed those of many Macs and that Apple advertises as being able to replace a Mac for many people. For that money and with that kind of advertising, these limitations are unacceptable and I don’t think the people pointing them out are being at all unreasonable.

Don’t get me wrong, I love my iPad for what it is. It’s an amazing tablet that can do many unique things. But the prices Apple has started charging for these things is getting absurd. And it’s especially infuriating that Apple is both charging Mac prices and artificially limiting what the device can do via software.
 

mandopicker101

macrumors member
Mar 21, 2022
70
55
It’s not just because the iPad doesn’t act as some users “insist it must”. It’s also because it doesn’t behave in the way Apple advertises it. Apple pushes the iPad Pro partially as a laptop replacement (your next computer isn’t a computer), a portable productivity powerhouse. Apple puts hardware that exceeds the specs of some Macs and charges prices that exceed that of some Macs.

But then there are all these software limitations that prevent the iPad from doing basic things Macs have been able to do for decades. Want to have more than 4 windows open at a time? No can do. Are you a pro that uses Final Cut? You literally can’t leave the app during an export without cancelling it.

These sorts of limitations are all results of the fact that iOS (yes, it’s still iOS despite the rebranding a few years ago) is a phone OS designed around aggressively protecting very scarce system resources. These limitations were understandable back when the iPad was a $500 device running on a phone processor with 256 MB of RAM. But now it’s a $1000-$2000 device with specs that exceed those of many Macs and that Apple advertises as being able to replace a Mac for many people. For that money and with that kind of advertising, these limitations are unacceptable and I don’t think the people pointing them out are being at all unreasonable.

Don’t get me wrong, I love my iPad for what it is. It’s an amazing tablet that can do many unique things. But the prices Apple has started charging for these things is getting absurd. And it’s especially infuriating that Apple is both charging Mac prices and artificially limiting what the device can do via software.
Surely hurting Apple’s bottom line is the solution - as in, stop buying pro devices until they offer better features at OS level. Declining sales of Pro devices should focus minds.
 
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Soccerrick10

macrumors member
Jan 28, 2019
77
136
I‘ve been primarily an iPad Pro user for the past 6-7 years. Up until April, I ran my consulting business entirely on my iPad Pro including the cloud based, database programming services I provided. Now retired and pursuing my passion for photography, my primary device for managing tens of thousands of raw files is my iPad Pro 12.9” M1. (Soon to be M4?)

I keep a Mac Mini on my desk for one purpose only. It runs my Canon ProGraph 1000 printer with their ProPrint software, outputting my black & white files to display quality prints.

Because I don’t use the Mini as often, it frustrates the heck out of me that tasks easily done on the iPad are so complicated on the Mac. So, I guess I fall into the camp where the iPad HAS all but replaced my computer. I guess it really comes down to what you are most comfortable learning and using.
 

ProbablyDylan

macrumors 6502a
Mar 26, 2024
597
1,203
Los Angeles
In 2021, I sold my M1 MacBook Air and spent some of the money on an MKB for my iPad Pro. I did this because I had realized that when I wanted to do something, I would pick up my iPad first. If I needed a computer, I could always use my Mac Mini anyways.

As it turns out, the iPad Pro was much more capable than I had expected. My Mac Mini mostly collects dust.
 
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Rainshadow

macrumors 6502a
Feb 16, 2017
635
1,389
It’s not just because the iPad doesn’t act as some users “insist it must”. It’s also because it doesn’t behave in the way Apple advertises it. Apple pushes the iPad Pro partially as a laptop replacement (your next computer isn’t a computer), a portable productivity powerhouse. Apple puts hardware that exceeds the specs of some Macs and charges prices that exceed that of some Macs.

But then there are all these software limitations that prevent the iPad from doing basic things Macs have been able to do for decades. Want to have more than 4 windows open at a time? No can do. Are you a pro that uses Final Cut? You literally can’t leave the app during an export without cancelling it.

These sorts of limitations are all results of the fact that iOS (yes, it’s still iOS despite the rebranding a few years ago) is a phone OS designed around aggressively protecting very scarce system resources. These limitations were understandable back when the iPad was a $500 device running on a phone processor with 256 MB of RAM. But now it’s a $1000-$2000 device with specs that exceed those of many Macs and that Apple advertises as being able to replace a Mac for many people. For that money and with that kind of advertising, these limitations are unacceptable and I don’t think the people pointing them out are being at all unreasonable.

Don’t get me wrong, I love my iPad for what it is. It’s an amazing tablet that can do many unique things. But the prices Apple has started charging for these things is getting absurd. And it’s especially infuriating that Apple is both charging Mac prices and artificially limiting what the device can do via software.
I mean, you answered yourself about apples advertising in your statement. They say ”your next computer isn’t a computer”

That means it will not do exactly what your computer did - because they said it’s NOT a computer. Which - we could get into how even your phone is a computer but what they mean is not a traditional computer.

Many folks don’t need those workflows that you mention. I use my iPad for WORK and I don’t need multiple screens open cluttering my space. The file system works just fine. Could be better but I don’t see the whining about it.

Idk. It could have better pro apps. It could have a slightly different file management program. But really… it’s not a computer. It’s an iPad which has a list of benefits you don’t get on a Mac.

I respect your opinion and recognize you still said you enjoy your iPad. This isn’t an attack or a defense. I’m just pointing out… it’s not supposed to be what computer folks want. Maybe it’s a generational thing.
 

jimimac71

macrumors 6502a
Sep 21, 2019
549
251
California
Bookmarks are still synced with a desktop/laptop browser.
I don’t use Safari as I don’t have a Mac. So I use Chrome.
I attempted to sync using iCloud and it made a mess of everything.
When my Windows 10 PC looses support, I can’t just use an iPad or Android tablet.
So I’m one looking for a computer replacement.
Rather than go Mac mini and iPad, a MacBook Air makes more sense.
For me a premium price either way.
Don’t like Windows 10 and really don’t like Windows 11.
Have seen it elsewhere.
So that leaves Chromebooks. You get what you pay for.
iPad as a nightlight? That is funny.
I have one that would light up your room and the parking lot. Cost less than $5.
 

Night Spring

macrumors G5
Jul 17, 2008
14,694
7,899
it’s not supposed to be what computer folks want. Maybe it’s a generational thing.
My aunt and uncle, who are in their mid to high 80s, have almost completely if not completely switched to iPads. They just need FaceTime and texts with their kids and grandkids, photos, watch videos and listen to music. For them, a traditional computer was always overkill.
 

AlexJaye

macrumors 6502a
Jul 13, 2010
528
897
I believe outside of some loud Internet forums and sites that insist that the iPad is useless because it doesn’t act how they insist it must, most actual iPad users love the things.
It isn’t useless, and I’m currently making my iPad Pro my main and getting rid of my MacBook Pro, but the iPad could be SO much more than it is. M4’s should have gone to Macs first really.
 
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ThunderSkunk

macrumors 68040
Dec 31, 2007
3,952
4,329
Milwaukee Area
I believe outside of some loud Internet forums and sites that insist that the iPad is useless because it doesn’t act how they insist it must, most actual iPad users love the things.
I believe that opinions based on the merits of ideas are worth considering, and opinions that instead rely on imagining a majority mob on your side backing you up are an appeal to tribalism made in desperation because the merits are poor to begin with.
 

UltraAppleFan

macrumors newbie
Jun 27, 2024
1
2
This is why I love the ipad pro. I can use it for work (note taking, video calls, etc), gaming, web browsing, youtube, netflix, ight video editing etc. All within one device. The only thing that needs some work is stage manager IMO.

A lot of the YT'ers make it seem like its awful because it cant run MacOS. Why would we want that?
 

ThunderSkunk

macrumors 68040
Dec 31, 2007
3,952
4,329
Milwaukee Area
So, outside of the "serious work" debate, I've found the iPad to be useful in really creative ways that a Macbook just wouldn't be suitable for. On a small road trip, I used my iPad Pro 11" M1 to do the following.
I use them for backlights when slide scanning, as a lightbox when tracing on paper, and occasionally as a coaster.

I love the thing, because it is very useful as a medium sized mobile device, thanks to its mobile OS and lightweight software. But I still need Apple to develop a full sized (15”+) creative tablet running OSX apps. They are two separate products. One does not negate the other. The guy directly above me is a consumer and has no use for creative tools, thats fine. But lets not fool ourselves into thinking no one needs to be a creator anymore, and we’re all just going to be a species of zombies shoving whatever random slop ai churns out down our gullets.
 
Last edited:

GMShadow

macrumors 68000
Jun 8, 2021
1,935
7,892
I believe that opinions based on the merits of ideas are worth considering, and opinions that instead rely on imagining a majority mob on your side backing you up are an appeal to tribalism made in desperation because the merits are poor to begin with.

Customer satisfaction ratings on the iPad are the highest for PCs/tablets every year. Feel free to go imagine talking to someone else.
 

ProbablyDylan

macrumors 6502a
Mar 26, 2024
597
1,203
Los Angeles
I love the thing, because it is very useful as a medium sized mobile device, thanks to its mobile OS and lightweight software. But I still need Apple to develop a full sized (15”+) creative tablet running OSX apps. They are two separate products. One does not negate the other. The guy directly above me is a consumer and has no use for creative tools, thats fine. But lets not fool ourselves into thinking no one needs to be a creator anymore, and we’re all just going to be a species of zombies shoving whatever random slop ai churns out down our gullets.

My understanding is that iPad offers great creative tools. What exactly do you need that the iPad cannot do already?

I've seen digital artist all over the internet praising the drawing and photo capabilities of the iPad. Procreate and Affinity Photo all receive glowing reviews.
 
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dk001

macrumors demi-god
Oct 3, 2014
10,970
15,318
Sage, Lightning, and Mountains
I‘ve been primarily an iPad Pro user for the past 6-7 years. Up until April, I ran my consulting business entirely on my iPad Pro including the cloud based, database programming services I provided. Now retired and pursuing my passion for photography, my primary device for managing tens of thousands of raw files is my iPad Pro 12.9” M1. (Soon to be M4?)

I keep a Mac Mini on my desk for one purpose only. It runs my Canon ProGraph 1000 printer with their ProPrint software, outputting my black & white files to display quality prints.

Because I don’t use the Mini as often, it frustrates the heck out of me that tasks easily done on the iPad are so complicated on the Mac. So, I guess I fall into the camp where the iPad HAS all but replaced my computer. I guess it really comes down to what you are most comfortable learning and using.

Your premise is a bit … short.

As an engineer I would love to be able to do all of my “Apple” work on an iPad Pro and my Window’s work on the same. Sadly I cannot. I can do maybe 2/3 of it on an iPad Pro. Far too often vendors/developers won’t add the iPad to their list because of Apple’s limitations. They either put out a crippled version of the software or stick to Mac/Win/Linux.

Great machine. Deliberately crippled OS. The hardware has out-evolved the software a while ago.
 

alecgold

macrumors 65816
Oct 11, 2007
1,443
991
NLD
It’s not just because the iPad doesn’t act as some users “insist it must”. It’s also because it doesn’t behave in the way Apple advertises it. Apple pushes the iPad Pro partially as a laptop replacement (your next computer isn’t a computer), a portable productivity powerhouse. Apple puts hardware that exceeds the specs of some Macs and charges prices that exceed that of some Macs.

But then there are all these software limitations that prevent the iPad from doing basic things Macs have been able to do for decades. Want to have more than 4 windows open at a time? No can do. Are you a pro that uses Final Cut? You literally can’t leave the app during an export without cancelling it.

These sorts of limitations are all results of the fact that iOS (yes, it’s still iOS despite the rebranding a few years ago) is a phone OS designed around aggressively protecting very scarce system resources. These limitations were understandable back when the iPad was a $500 device running on a phone processor with 256 MB of RAM. But now it’s a $1000-$2000 device with specs that exceed those of many Macs and that Apple advertises as being able to replace a Mac for many people. For that money and with that kind of advertising, these limitations are unacceptable and I don’t think the people pointing them out are being at all unreasonable.

Don’t get me wrong, I love my iPad for what it is. It’s an amazing tablet that can do many unique things. But the prices Apple has started charging for these things is getting absurd. And it’s especially infuriating that Apple is both charging Mac prices and artificially limiting what the device can do via software.
What is a computer? Something that has a decades old OS on it? For my kids going to school the iPad is the computer that does everything they need. They have never noticed any limitations (well, parental supervision is annoying according to them).
 

alecgold

macrumors 65816
Oct 11, 2007
1,443
991
NLD
Your premise is a bit … short.

As an engineer I would love to be able to do all of my “Apple” work on an iPad Pro and my Window’s work on the same. Sadly I cannot. I can do maybe 2/3 of it on an iPad Pro. Far too often vendors/developers won’t add the iPad to their list because of Apple’s limitations. They either put out a crippled version of the software or stick to Mac/Win/Linux.

Great machine. Deliberately crippled OS. The hardware has out-evolved the software a while ago.
This is such a silly argumentation. It’s like arguing my Festool cordless drill won’t drill in prefab industrial concrete like a heavy Hilti hammer drill on mains does. They are different tools for different uses.
You iPad isn’t the first choice for engineering software. Never has been, never will be. And the fact that it has a M4 chip doesnt mean it becomes a CAD machine.
What it does mean is it can run huge files in Notability, it means it can keep much more tabs in safari open, switch back to the huge Notability file and still not have to reload. It means working in stage manager is much more fluent.
So just like in engineering, use the right and best tool for the job and enjoy the experience of using high quality tools.
 
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rwlombard70

macrumors newbie
May 10, 2024
9
21
Such a strange argument that if it costs close to what a Mac costs that it has to be able to do everything that a Mac does. Shouldn’t the inverse be true as well then? A Mac does some things better and more efficiently. And iPad does some things better and it’s certainly way more versatile. No, it’s file system is not as robust, it’s apps can be more limited (I’d argue that‘s more on developers though; no reason Teams, Outlook, etc can’t be better for example), and it has more ports. But a Mac also doesn’t have a touch screen, can’t be used in tablet mode, doesn’t support the Apple Pencil, AND doesn’t have a cellular modem which is a massive plus for the iPad.
 

MacDevil7334

Contributor
Oct 15, 2011
2,535
5,750
Austin TX
What is a computer? Something that has a decades old OS on it? For my kids going to school the iPad is the computer that does everything they need. They have never noticed any limitations (well, parental supervision is annoying according to them).
But that’s just the thing - the one with the decades old OS can do more things than an iPad with the exact same hardware (M series chip, keyboard, and mouse/trackpad). In fact, the one with the decades old operating system could do those things with hardware that was vastly inferior to today’s iPads. The hardware today is more than capable of doing more things (including true backgrounding tasks that have been table stakes in other OSs for decades). But Apple is making a deliberate choice to limit the iPad via software. That’s the issue. Apple is selling iPads for Mac prices, marketing them as Mac replacements, and yet crippling the software in ways that limits functionality.

Again, I want to emphasize that I do really like the iPad. It has a place in my workflow that the Mac can‘t replicate. But I don’t think it is unreasonable to want an iPad with a better chip than some Macs and that costs the same as a Mac to be able to do things a Mac can when connected to a keyboard and trackpad (at a minimum).
 
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ProbablyDylan

macrumors 6502a
Mar 26, 2024
597
1,203
Los Angeles
As an engineer I would love to be able to do all of my “Apple” work on an iPad Pro and my Window’s work on the same. Sadly I cannot. I can do maybe 2/3 of it on an iPad Pro. Far too often vendors/developers won’t add the iPad to their list because of Apple’s limitations. They either put out a crippled version of the software or stick to Mac/Win/Linux.

It's simply the wrong tool for the job, like how a laptop isn't the right machine to train a few billion parameter LLM. Is the Mac an inferior computer because it doesn't have Microsoft Publisher?
 
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