Thermal Issues

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by vbman213, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. vbman213 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    #1
    Compared to my 2010 Core i7 MBP, this retina is a scorcher!

    [​IMG]

    Is this normal?

    I'm maxing out using yes > /dev/null (eight instances)

    I actually saw my computer running at 102 degrees for some time. the fans seem to engage faster in this machine but the temperatures at full RPM don't go down nearly as much as 6k RPM on my 2010 MBP (@6k RPM the temps would be around 78 degrees). Should I be concerned?
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    Depending on your workload, your temps are quite normal and you should not be concerned at all. There are dozens of threads on this.

    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level.

    If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC.
    (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  3. kittencounter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2013
    #3
    Please check your discrete graphic card. If it's active the whole thing will cook eggs. Don't force it on just to improve UI performance. The other thing is if you have big workload on CPU/GPU while the battery is recharging it gets extremely hot to. But this is normal.
     
  4. vbman213 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    #4
    Browsing the forum, I have read about some people seeing around 75 at max CPU.
     
  5. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #5
    Actually, there have been countless posts of much higher temps than that... 100C+, under high demands. As long as your Mac isn't shutting down due to temps, you don't need to worry about it.
     
  6. maratus macrumors 6502a

    maratus

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    #6
    Check the thread in my sig. Which CPU is in your machine? And keep in mind that all cores in quads are running hotter due to higher total power than your dual core i7 in 2010 model!


    Your temps are fine assuming you have 2.3GHz or 2.4GHz processor. 22-26C is as good as it gets for heatsink - CPU delta. Heatsink t is the same as GPU analog diode when 650M is switched off.

    If you're running any of those 2.6/2.7/2.8 models then your temps are simply great!
     
  7. Jinzen macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    #7
    Yes, it's normal.

    ----------

    That's a wrong reading. Different software will read differently. iStat Pro reads my CPU right now at 34C, while it's actually definitely not. It's closer to 50-52C according to smcFanControl.

    In any case, all Retinas will hit 100Cs, and it really doesn't matter because Intel CPUs are literally the most reliable part in the entire computer. You could probably run them at 100C constant for years and have another part fail before then.
     
  8. iStiggy macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2013
    #8
    You're in good shape. Your fans aren't maxing their RPM and still your machine is keeping cool. I would only be worried if your fans are maxing out and your temps are still around 100C.
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    Make sure you're reading the same sensor with both apps. The difference between them is usually not that great.
     
  10. maratus macrumors 6502a

    maratus

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    #10
    1. iStat Pro wan't updated to read Ivy Bridge temps correctly. It only shows CPU heatsink, which is completely useless. smcFanControl, unless you have a version compiled by me, was updated to use CPU proximity diode (regular version doesn't recognise rMBP sensors), which is still up to 30C less under load than CPU core, although it's higher than CPU heatsink from iStat Pro (for me, the difference is 10C under load)

    2. If CPU runs at 100C for a long time, you may have instability problems. Integrated Memory Controller is one of the blocks that may give random errors when overheated. You may not even notice, but sometimes it's a problem. This is especially important for 16GB RAM configurations due to higher memory capacitive load.
     
  11. vbman213 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    #11
    I left my machine idling in my apartment for an hour today while I was in class. I set it to never sleep but I did decrease the brightness all the way. After an hour, my average was somewhere between 38-40 degrees C. Under 100% load (8x'yes>/dev/null) and max fans, the system will park around where my original post displays. so idle = 39 degrees C and insane max is about 90 degrees C. Oh, and I have a 2.4Ghz chip
     
  12. maratus macrumors 6502a

    maratus

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    #12
    Fair enough, 90C for yes> /dev/null loop is fine.
    If you want to double check what a maximum CPU load can do temps wise, use Prime95 stress test (In-place large FFTs test).
     

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