Thinking about moving across the pond.

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by wonga1127, Aug 13, 2008.

  1. wonga1127 macrumors 6502

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    #1
    I'm 17, entering my last year of high school tomorrow, and I'm just tired of America. I went to the UK for about two weeks in June and I fell in love and I haven't been able to get it out of my mind since. I am seriously considering immigrating to the UK, but I'm not sure if it would be more work than it would be worth. How hard is it to get UK National or Citizen status? Would it be easier to go to college here in America and get in a study abroad program to the UK? How hard is it to find cheap flats? Jobs? Would a move to a country with a currency twice as strong as mine just be flat out too expensive?
     
  2. Queso macrumors G4

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    #2
    Probably not a good time right now. Our country is heading into recession, which apparently is all down to international factors, although the past 10 years of prosperity was down to Gordon Brown :rolleyes:

    Cheap flats and jobs don't tend to be clustered in the same areas. The places with good employment opportunities are more expensive to live in. Get a degree then come over is my advice. It'll help.
     
  3. Kardashian macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

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    Britain.
    #3
    I'll trade with you.

    PM me. We'll switch photographs, get our Passports updated and BAM!.

    We're done.

    Then, we'll 'meet' on match.com, and marry. Then you gain US citizenship back, and I gain my British citizenship back.

    Deal?
     
  4. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    #4
    Then move to a different city/state and stop complaining.
     
  5. it5five macrumors 65816

    it5five

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    #5
    That's ridiculous. If he's tired of America, how would moving to a different state, which would be IN the United States, solve his problems?

    To the OP: Getting a degree first would help no matter what country you want to move to. I'm looking at moving to Quebec, and having a degree is practically a requirement.
     
  6. Xander562 macrumors 68000

    Xander562

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    #6
    Lol what?!
     
  7. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #7
    You need to visit the UK for a longer period of time before you consider permanent residency; two weeks is not nearly long enough to fully grasp the intricacies of life in another country. Nothing against the UK, but the grass always appears greener on the other side. You'll find that the UK has it's problem, just like the US (and every other country on earth).

    And Badandy's post, while rather abrupt, does have some merit. America is a diverse country, and you may find that moving to another city will seem as different as another country. If you currently live in Kentucky, for example, you might find life in San Francisco to be exactly what you're looking for (or vice versa).
     
  8. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    #8
    That was exactly my point. I live in Los Angeles, and I'm currently in London right now. I wouldn't be opposed to working here if a job required it, but I think you might be underestimating the huge diversity of places there are in America. Maybe moving into "the city" (if you aren't already in a bustling downtown) might lead you to the right course of action before taking the drastic step of moving to a place where your money is worth close to nothing initially...

    it5five: I know you're headed to Canada as soon as you can (from another thread) because you dislike America and are a socialist, so go ahead. You have your reasons, and you seem to be in the position to make this big decision. I just get the feeling that wonga might be rushing to a decision here before examining the wealth of options that are available here.
     
  9. bigandy macrumors G3

    bigandy

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  10. Schtumple macrumors 601

    Schtumple

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    #10
    The essential guide to becoming English

    1. Work up a large sense of anger towards the government, there doesn't have to be a reasoning behind it, as long as you hate the government.

    2. Learn to queue, seriously, we are masters at it, don't want to get left behind now.

    3. Learn to complain about the price of everything, and how walkers crisps are more air than food no-a-days.

    4. Hate the local council/council tax, seriously, what does it all get spent on??

    5. Tea, you must now love it, undivided love.

    6. The post office is your best friend, until they lose your mail, then they're all out to get you, stealing your credit cards, identity etc...

    7. 1 Litre of petrol costs more than 1 litre of HP colour ink...

    8. We do the metric thing...

    That's all I can really think of :p

    I would say you'd really need to take a long hard think before committing to moving here, specifically think about where you want to live, the cost of living in London is huge compared to living in rather rural areas (like me), it's a big jump and maybe you should look into places closer to home, as mentioned above.

    I've found New York, San Francisco and LA all to be different areas, each with their own traditions, locals, you might not have to go far to find a different america...
     
  11. Thunderpuppy macrumors newbie

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    Houston, Texas
    #11
    I work for a British Company

    Everyone should live outside the USA for a minimum of a year or two. I have lived in UK for 3 years and spent a year in Vietnam years ago. I can tell you this for sure. When you come back you will appreciate your country more than you do now. Hey, we have our problems but then again so do every other country in this world. Socialism, Communism and if you think the UK is going to be cheap you better start doing your research online for jobs and remember their own countrymen will be given preference over and American. You will also need to get a Workers Visa and trust me the Brits have a low tolerance for "yanks." Don't get me wrong they are great people but you will always be an outsider. Fnally, their food absolutely SUCKS!

    The good news is that when you return from an extended stay you will look at the USA with fresh new eyes and realize , no matter what, this is still the greatest country in the world. If not then why would so many people still be trying to come here? Good Luck!!
     
  12. bigandy macrumors G3

    bigandy

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    #12
    ^-- fixed that for you.

    Much as I can't stand the UK, I disagree with that completely. If you're talking about fish and chips, hell yes, but not for good food at decent restaurants. I've found it easier to find good food here than in the US.

    Quantity != Quality.
     
  13. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #13
    America is HUGE. seriously living in co is a FAR different experience than the midwest or south (i know as ive been there and done it). Each are nice in their own way

    same thing with cities.

    To believe that the US is homogeneous is beyond ridiculous
     
  14. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #14
    I think coming from the USA, the OP will be quite proficient at that particular skill.

    2a Learn to spell "queue" and learn that it means "stand in line".
    Except with miles, acres and pints of beer. Curious, that.

    Huh? Where?
    Huh? Yanks? In which century were you here?
    Charming. Perhaps our low tolerance was related to yours...

    Words fail me.
     
  15. Schtumple macrumors 601

    Schtumple

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    #15
    Thank you :p

    I'm sorry but that comment is rediculous, I've been to some pretty bad places in my time, but I've been to hundreds of great places, you can't generalise an entire country just because you obviously find us to be inferior to your mighty country :rolleyes: it would be like me saying every Texan is a gun toting Bush supporter...
     
  16. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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  17. Thunderpuppy macrumors newbie

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    Houston, Texas
    #17
    I apologize

    I loved the 3 years I lived in the UK and the people I meant. My parents and I lived in a flat and my parents became God Parents to the couple they became great friends with. However, I stand by my comments on the food though. I lived and worked with them while there and loved exploring the country and visiting London and all the historical sites throughout the country.

    I stand by my statements as to their feeling regarding Americans also! All countries have their nuances and from the responses received I see that I may have offended others from the UK and that was not my intent. I will always look back on my years there with fond memories. Except for the food. No one can change my mind on that! Peace!
     
  18. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #18
    I don't doubt that for a minute. But, like here, it's not the country he's running from, but the politics.

    Not to me.

    You screw with an English pint and I will hurt you.

    Severely.
     
  19. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    #19
    About the food:

    I've found it hit or miss. Many times, you'll find great restaurants only to find out they are very expensive for us Americans (most everything is though...). These posh places sometimes have great food, but on the whole, I have been extremely disappointed with the food that I would describe as "everyday food". I'm not talking about McDonalds or BurgerKing, I mean local cafés and sandwich bars which really do thinks a LOT differently than in the U.S. For example, a toasted cheese sandwich will get you two pieces of white bread pushed together and made slightly warm by a terrible toaster that barely makes the cheese inside hot. That tastes horrendous. Also, the "bacon" here is way different than the U.S. It's much softer, fattier, and less cooked than in America, and I find it very unpleasant. Also, service here is terrible compared to American standards, but nearly everyone (even the locals) know this and accept it for what it is. Between waiters rudely standing over you while you pay them (Americans tip very well, stop watching me pull out my wallet), waiters rarely refilling your water glass, and an overall apathy towards eating customer service, it is quite disconcerting for someone used to American food and service.

    To be sure, many of these things are personal preferences that people are used to, but there is a marked difference in the service and in the preparation of some meals that are average (7 pound and below I'd say).


    So that's my take, but I'm enjoying London immensely.
     
  20. Queso macrumors G4

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    #20
    One of those just got the boot in favour of hectares. DEFRA went all European whilst everyone was sleeping :)
     
  21. iBlue macrumors Core

    iBlue

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    London, England
    #21
    I'm an american, I emigrated to the UK. It's not at all easy to do. Maybe you should consider moving cities rather than countries. Although I doubt you'll believe me, things can be very frustrating here too. There's BS to deal with everywhere, it's just different BS.
     
  22. mariahlullaby macrumors 6502a

    mariahlullaby

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    Location:
    NYC
    #22
    I think everyone in this thread has brought up some really valid points...I'd listen to what they're saying.

    In my opinion, I'd say go for an American college, exploit the heck out of their study abroad program, and go from there.

    I was born in a small Georgia town, and moved to Brussels, Belgium when I was seven and we lived there for five years. My brother attended and graduated from high school in Belgium, and attended a US college. I moved back with my parents to a suburb in Georgia, I go to college in New York City, and I came back in May from a semester in London (which was great...partly due to the awesomely warm reception from MR members!).

    I'm not saying it makes me an expert, but I've lived in a foreign country, been all over the US, and really considered going to college in the UK as well. From what I learned, it's going to be pretty difficult, especially since they have very specific entrance exams (from what I see... been a few years since I looked at this stuff).

    Some things to think about:

    1. Study abroad programs are amazing. Seriously, how often can you just decide to go live in another country for 4-5 months, and just go, and come back when you want? Without all the extra hassles? You can experience London, or any other place. Go live in London for 1, 2, 19 semesters...and I'm not just recommending it because I did it :p I was able to intern while I was in London, which I loved, and I'm still working for the London company now that I'm back home...so you can always make helpful contacts while you're attending a US school.

    2. Visiting isn't the same as living. Not saying you didn't get a good idea for London -- it's a great place -- but I'd say you haven't "lived" there until you hit the 6 month mark (I only was in London for 4 months myself). That's when it stops feeling like a vacation and you start noticing all the other stuff, too.

    3. College is a big enough transition without adding culture shock to it. Not saying you can't do it, plenty of people do, just keep that in mind. My brother had a hard time (as an American) going to an American school coming straight from Belgium...again, he's not everyone, but something to think about.

    4. Agree with everyone saying that the US is diverse, so make sure to check out everything it has to offer.

    5. And, just to be a complete devil's advocate, if you really, truly, and passionately want to go to school in London...make it happen, cause this is the time in your life to do that ;)

    Good luck!
     
  23. c-Row macrumors 65816

    c-Row

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    #23
    I have yet to come across a 30.48cm vinyl record... :p
     
  24. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

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    #24
    Yet you're from Somerset? I live in the rural north and the last time I had a lengthy queue was at Blackpool Pleasure Beach :p

    If you were to come here and wanted to avoid being "the yank" you'd have to quickly learn and adopt a British way of working. One of my university lecturers was from Boston and, accent aside, there was nothing to differentiate her from the rest of us Brits. Her family visited and we felt the full blown force of "the yank". There's a very subtle but commanding series of mannerisms and behavioural traits that you'll need to match.

    And be prepared to have weather govern your life.
     
  25. Schtumple macrumors 601

    Schtumple

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    #25
    Yeah the system is hugely hypocritical, I think that's been said already tbh...

    The Wilkinsons near me has the masters of queueing, they weave perfectly in and out the isles, it's almost an art form :p

    Back on topic: The one thing my aunt told me when she moved to America (vice versa to your situation I know, but same principle), was that you have to be prepared to be alone for a while, it was quite difficult for her to make new friends when she moved to L.A.

    I think you need to think about the fact that when you first move here, you won't know anyone, but I guess the initial gimmick of being in the UK might soften that, until you read your council tax bill :p
     

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