Thinking of getting samsung 840 or 840 pro...difference?


TyPod

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840 EVO uses 19nm TLC, 840 Pro uses MLC and has a higher amount of write cycles, which isn't a big issue because under normal use it's said you can get several years of use out of them.
 

costabunny

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I got the EVO as the write cycles seem pretty unimportant. I expect to be replacing it in five years (as requirements increase).

This review explains them and it should last way beyond 5years

I should add its nice and fast as well - getting near 500/500 speeds on a SATAIII card
 

koban4max

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I got the EVO as the write cycles seem pretty unimportant. I expect to be replacing it in five years (as requirements increase).

This review explains them and it should last way beyond 5years

I should add its nice and fast as well - getting near 500/500 speeds on a SATAIII card
thanks.

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I got the EVO as the write cycles seem pretty unimportant. I expect to be replacing it in five years (as requirements increase).

This review explains them and it should last way beyond 5years

I should add its nice and fast as well - getting near 500/500 speeds on a SATAIII card
what consider writing and reading? just curious since it's my first buy.
 

koban4max

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Like this in fact (just ran that now for you :) thats the EVO 1TB, running on a Apricorn Velocity Solo X2 (SATA 6GB/s PCIe Card) in the Mac Pro in my sig
geez...that's good..but i have no clue about the significance of SSD...other than it won't last long and its fast...but what's fast?:eek:
 

costabunny

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geez...that's good..but i have no clue about the significance of SSD...other than it won't last long and its fast...but what's fast?:eek:
compared to a HDD its a world of difference. The whole system will feel lightening fast. Much faster application load times, save times etc. faster startup and shutdown. File copies quicker etc.

hard disks average around the 100MB/s, whereas an SSD will usually be about 270MB/s or more (mine are on the PCIe controller at 6GB/s speeds so I get near the 500MB/s).

as for not lasting long I think that needs a little perspective. A normal user should easily see an SSD lasting longer than a HDD in years.
 

koban4max

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compared to a HDD its a world of difference. The whole system will feel lightening fast. Much faster application load times, save times etc. faster startup and shutdown. File copies quicker etc.

hard disks average around the 100MB/s, whereas an SSD will usually be about 270MB/s or more (mine are on the PCIe controller at 6GB/s speeds so I get near the 500MB/s).

as for not lasting long I think that needs a little perspective. A normal user should easily see an SSD lasting longer than a HDD in years.
so if i'm using audio programs like logic pro 9 or final cut pro 7...does it "write" or "read" a lot? What cause the deterioration of that SSD?
 

costabunny

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so if i'm using audio programs like logic pro 9 or final cut pro 7...does it "write" or "read" a lot? What cause the deterioration of that SSD?
Final cut could benefit - depends on your workflow. My other half uses Logic Pro X a lot and without his SSD it would be painful waiting for large sample banks, tracks etc to load and save.

Have a read of all the pages in this article - it explains SSD advantages versus HDD.

deterioration is caused as each little bit of memory on the disk can only be written to so many times (many thousands) - but other clever tricks the SSD's use allow for this, hence why they are now at the level where an SSD is expected to last longer than a HDD at similar workloads.
 

koban4max

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Final cut could benefit - depends on your workflow. My other half uses Logic Pro X a lot and without his SSD it would be painful waiting for large sample banks, tracks etc to load and save.

Have a read of all the pages in this article - it explains SSD advantages versus HDD.

deterioration is caused as each little bit of memory on the disk can only be written to so many times (many thousands) - but other clever tricks the SSD's use allow for this, hence why they are now at the level where an SSD is expected to last longer than a HDD at similar workloads.
if i delete files...would that preserve SSD?
 

koban4max

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do you mean make it last longer? how many years do you see it being useful? (I mean how long before you would upgrade the system or get a bigger SSD for example?)
i'm planning to use it on mac pro...09... for few more years i suppose...it's good computer...I want to keep it for while longer.

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do you mean make it last longer? how many years do you see it being useful? (I mean how long before you would upgrade the system or get a bigger SSD for example?)
i'm hoping more than 5 years.
 

costabunny

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i'm planning to use it on mac pro...09... for few more years i suppose...it's good computer...I want to keep it for while longer.

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i'm hoping more than 5 years.
In my opinion; I would say there isn't much between a HDD or an SSD in terms of life expectancy of five years plus.

My Intel 520 series (I use exclusively for Bootcamp) is a couple of years old now and still at 100% health. I honestly expect it to last me many years yet and will probably have to get a bigger one before it wears out.

there is no easy answer - I suggest reading that article I linked in full and deciding what your needs will be based on that.

If you need the performance then an SSD is the only real option. And as long as you keep backups (as every user should) then no worries.

I have yet to have an SSD fail, and I have been using them since they first became affordable.

I have had my share of HDD's fail.

My main reason for preferring SSD is generally if it does get used enough to wear out, it will become read only. when a hard disk fails its a physical device and as such data loss is very likely.
 

koban4max

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In my opinion; I would say there isn't much between a HDD or an SSD in terms of life expectancy of five years plus.

My Intel 520 series (I use exclusively for Bootcamp) is a couple of years old now and still at 100% health. I honestly expect it to last me many years yet and will probably have to get a bigger one before it wears out.

there is no easy answer - I suggest reading that article I linked in full and deciding what your needs will be based on that.

If you need the performance then an SSD is the only real option. And as long as you keep backups (as every user should) then no worries.

I have yet to have an SSD fail, and I have been using them since they first became affordable.

I have had my share of HDD's fail.

My main reason for preferring SSD is generally if it does get used enough to wear out, it will become read only. when a hard disk fails its a physical device and as such data loss is very likely.
Thanks so much with infos.
 

AidenShaw

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if i delete files...would that preserve SSD?
The best thing to do is to avoid running it for long periods almost full.

One trick to help this is to make sure that free space is available on the disk. Best way is to leave unallocated space (only make 220-240 GB of partitions on a 256 GB disk - that guarantees no more than around 90% full).

Making sure that TRIM is enabled is also very important - a TRIM-enabled 256 GB partition with 36 GB free is the same as a 220 GB partition with 36 GB unpartitioned.

The unpartitioned (or TRIM'd) free space helps the disk avoid making extra write/erase cycles as part of housekeeping.
 

koban4max

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The best thing to do is to avoid running it for long periods almost full.

One trick to help this is to make sure that free space is available on the disk. Best way is to leave unallocated space (only make 220-240 GB of partitions on a 256 GB disk - that guarantees no more than around 90% full).

Making sure that TRIM is enabled is also very important - a TRIM-enabled 256 GB partition with 36 GB free is the same as a 220 GB partition with 36 GB unpartitioned.

The unpartitioned (or TRIM'd) free space helps the disk avoid making extra write/erase cycles as part of housekeeping.
Yes...about Trim..i heard about this...is this automatic trimmed? or what?
 

AidenShaw

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Yes...about Trim..i heard about this...is this automatic trimmed? or what?
In the normal case (i.e. an Apple OS with an Apple SSD, or Windows with any SSD that identifies itself as supporting TRIM), when a file is deleted the OS sends an extra command to the disk that says basically "the following sectors no longer contain data of interest".

That gives the SSD controller the freedom to coalesce and erase unused blocks without have to move (which means more writes) sectors which might be in use. Without the OS telling the drive which sectors aren't used, it might save (i.e. write) sectors from files which have been deleted by the OS file system.

If you put a non-Apple drive in an Apple, Apple OSX will not send these TRIM commands to the drive -- unless you hack Apple OSX with a "TRIM enabler" that disables the check for whether the SSD was bought from Apple.
Windows and other operating systems will send the TRIM commands to any drive which says "I support TRIM" when it's brought online. Apple adds a check to make sure that the drive was purchased from Apple -- unless you disable that with one of the "TRIM enabler" hacks. (Isn't proprietary software wonderful?)
 

koban4max

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In the normal case (i.e. an Apple OS with an Apple SSD, or Windows with any SSD that identifies itself as supporting TRIM), when a file is deleted the OS sends an extra command to the disk that says basically "the following sectors no longer contain data of interest".

That gives the SSD controller the freedom to coalesce and erase unused blocks without have to move (which means more writes) sectors which might be in use. Without the OS telling the drive which sectors aren't used, it might save (i.e. write) sectors from files which have been deleted by the OS file system.

If you put a non-Apple drive in an Apple, Apple OSX will not send these TRIM commands to the drive -- unless you hack Apple OSX with a "TRIM enabler" that disables the check for whether the SSD was bought from Apple.
Windows and other operating systems will send the TRIM commands to any drive which says "I support TRIM" when it's brought online. Apple adds a check to make sure that the drive was purchased from Apple -- unless you disable that with one of the "TRIM enabler" hacks. (Isn't proprietary software wonderful?)
basically, from my understanding, using trim will prevent saving these "writes?"
Also prevent apple checking the driver?
 

koban4max

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I think you get the point -
  • TRIM means fewer writes
  • Fewer writes means longer life and better performance



TRIM enablers will "prevent Apple's driver from checking the drive" in some fashion.
If not putting trim on...then I guess it will store up these "writes."
 

AidenShaw

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This explains trim pretty well

:)
I like the bit about the pieces of paper (it ignores the issue of pages vs. blocks, but is a nice easy to grasp metaphor).

That link is wrong, however, when it says "A TRIM command enables your operating system to find the marked pages before you need them and wipe them clean".

The erasing is done in the SSD controller - the only thing TRIM does is give the controller information about which previously written pages are no longer used by the file system. The controller does the erasing (more efficiently, because it does have to move (write) pages that have been freed).