Thinking of making the BIG SWITCH!!!

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by mm1250, Sep 3, 2007.

  1. mm1250 macrumors 6502

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    Sep 3, 2007
    #1
    Hello,

    I've had an iPod for years and over the past few months aftering getting my iPhone I have been debating getting a Mac for use now. I've been very happy with the iPhone, so happy I have made stock investments into AAPL stock.

    My background is a computer engineer. I currently work with a IT Consulting business that works basiclly on MS Windows servers and desktops PCS. I'm a Microsoft Certified Systems Engnieer. I remember making fun of Apple back in the late 90s. (I think it was Crapintosh) It seems Apple has come a long way, the big switches from what I hear is the UNIX backend OS and the Intel chipset switchover. Bascilly making it a PC I would assume.

    My question is. I've been using Windows since day 1, and I feel kind of wierd doing this. What is the real difference with the Mac OS that beats Windows? Set aside the Virus and spyware issues in windows. What's the HUGE benifit for me, I use my PC for, Internet, Music, word processing, web design with web graphic design (Dreamweaver and Fireworks), very little picture stuff. I have a whitebox dual-core Intel now and a Dell notebook.

    I'm considering either the new iMac or the MacBook Pro. Also, whats with the Macbook Pros costing $2k+. I priced out HP and Dells and they are almost 25-30% cheaper for the same config!! What's with the price premimum?
     
  2. grovertdog macrumors regular

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    Sep 14, 2006
    #2
    UNIX, specifically a special derivative of FreeBSD, but definitely NOT Linux.

    Seriously, you say are a MS certified engineer and you ask such banal questions? You're kidding, and the joke's on me, right?
     
  3. NightFlight macrumors 6502

    NightFlight

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    #3

    Way to make the guy feel welcome. :mad:
     
  4. Unspeaked macrumors 68020

    Unspeaked

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    #4
    From a newbie, no less!

    Anyway, back to the OP, I think an iMac would be fine for your needs, but as for specifics as to why a Mac is better than a PC - it's not true for everyone.

    If you poke through the forums here, you'll have a pretty good idea of advantages and disadvantages.

    One you'll hear a lot is that you'll have the flexability of running the Mac OS and Windows on the same box. You'll also be using a machine that is more tightly integrated to its OS and software, as Apple keeps things working together smoothly with most developers.

    You'll also have a mess of cool things in Leopard to look forward to that Windows can't offer, like Time Machine and Spaces (more info at Apple's site).
     
  5. mm1250 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #5
    Hello All. I'm pretty much sold on getting a Mac, weather it's a Mac Mini, Imac or MacbookPro. I will wait until Oct-Nov time to buy.

    In the meantime, I have a windows box laying around. I was wondering if it is possible to put a Mac OS on a PC Box? I just want to kind of play with it.

    BTW: I changed it to UNIX, I was under the impression it ran a Linux backend.
     
  6. Much Ado macrumors 68000

    Much Ado

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    #6
    Hi there,

    Glad to know you are ready for a Mac :) If you're after tips for pirating Apple's OS on a generic PC then most people around here will not be too happy. Best to go to an Apple store and try the real thing.

    Hope the switch works out well.
     
  7. grovertdog macrumors regular

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    Sep 14, 2006
    #7

    Yeah, right, a "noob", so sorry I don't have more time to spend in these forums but I have a life, a practice, and a family to manage. Until you guys get cool Motorola SKU appendages, why not relax?

    Are you really buying off this guy is MSCE certified? The same fellow who can't spell "engineer"? C'mon, if that post isn't a troll, what is? I do see the OP had the wisdom to edit the original post, removing the Linux reference.
     
  8. mm1250 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #8
    Well, I figured if you can run Windows using VMware, bootcamp or Paraell, you should be able to run Mac OS on a Vista box using a virtualazation software. I'm still getting a Mac, but I really want to be able to run Mac OS on my office PC to really get a feel for the OS.


     
  9. Krevnik macrumors 68040

    Krevnik

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    Sep 8, 2003
    #9
    The low-end Apple models of MacBook and MacBook Pro are not as price competitive as Dell or others at times. It is the 17" MBP and the mid-range MacBook that are price competitive. Dell doesn't even offer a laptop with a 2.4Ghz Core 2 Duo (and you can only get the 2.33 on their XPS line), for example. Another nice thing about hardware is the small touches that a lot of OEMs miss: backlit keys that aren't obnoxious, built-in optical audio support and MagSafe are nice ways that Apple makes their hardware different from other OEMs beyond just the specs.

    For the price conscious, and as a first system, buy refurbished if possible. It has the same warranty as new, packed up like new, just cheaper. The refurbished systems are Apple's version of sale pricing, and also help make certain models fit a particular budget. And they are good systems, no worse than buying new (in terms of failure rate).
     
  10. amac4me macrumors 65816

    amac4me

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    Apr 26, 2005
    #10
    First off ... congrats on your decision to make the switch :D

    There are several great reasons but I think user experience tops them all. Besides, a Mac is the only computer where you can install Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux.

    It will be your one stop computer!
     
  11. Krevnik macrumors 68040

    Krevnik

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    #11
    VMWare and Parallels are presenting hardware to the guest OS that Windows has drivers for... So far, there is only one app out there that can run OS X on Windows/Linux, and it is slooooooooooooooow. Mostly because it doesn't virtualize, it emulates the PPC chip on x86.

    The big legal problem is that OS X's EULA prohibits running on non-Apple hardware... and even now, you aren't allowed to virtualize Vista Home according to the EULA. Bootcamp isn't virtualization, but just a set of drivers and a partitioning tool for the average joe (Apple's hardware can boot Windows natively).
     
  12. Stampyhead macrumors 68020

    Stampyhead

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    #12
    Hmm, I think you mean MCSE? And who cares if he's MCSE certified or not? He came on here to ask about purchasing a Mac and his certifications have nothing to do with it. I think his questions are valid. The only one here who sounds like a troll is you.
     
  13. Krevnik macrumors 68040

    Krevnik

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    #13
    To be honest, I am not sure why MCSE certification is getting hyped up here. It is a simple certification used to get by the HR gatekeepers in some fields. In my experience, a piece of paper rarely tells you anything about a person's qualifications or character, so I don't see why a certification should be used to bash the OP either.
     
  14. psychofreak Retired

    psychofreak

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    #14
    Faster to start up is great. Mac OSX looks fantastic compared to Windows, as does the hardware. When you found cheaper PCs at the same spec, I bet they didn't come with a backlit keyboard with ambilight sensor (comes on when its dark) or the beautiful look of the MBP. Remember that your specs will be used to the full as no processor cycles or RAM will be used checking for viruses.
     
  15. Thunderpuppy macrumors newbie

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    #15
  16. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #16
    Running OSX on non-Apple hardware breaks the EULA so can't go there. You could try renting a machine for a few weeks but that could be expensive. Alternatively, if its just the feel of the OS you want, you could pick up a refurb Mac mini for $429 from the Apple refurb store and hook up your own kbd/mouse/monitor. After trying it out for a couple of months if you don't like it, sell it on eBay or craigslist. You'll be out of pocket maybe $80 at most.
     
  17. grovertdog macrumors regular

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    #17
    Sorry, "dog is my co-pilot" and I do suffer from occasional dyslexia. I meant MCSE, my bad.

    Please also accept my apology for offending your politically correct senses. The original OP's questions, which you term as valid were "What is the real difference with the Mac OS that beats Windows? Set aside the Virus and spyware issues in windows. What's the HUGE benifit for me". One man's valid is another's banal, I suppose. Speaking of different interpretations, I suggest you research the definition of the term "troll" before incorrectly applying it.
     
  18. grovertdog macrumors regular

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    #18
    You misunderstood- I wasn't using MCSE to "bash"; rather I was merely indicating the question posed was not one a "computer engineer" would likely draft. The "piece of paper" you refer to is attained after passing tests, paying fees, etc.,and is intended to "CERTIFY" a certain level of competence (and, of course, you're right- it is a "ticket to ride" for many IT jobs). The OP provided this info in terms of his bona fides, did he not, therefore, why they should be "off limits" escapes me.
     
  19. Stampyhead macrumors 68020

    Stampyhead

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    #19
    And I think this is an entirely valid question. Apart from the fact that he could have done a forum search and found plenty of information, as this subject has been done to death here, I know if I had been using a particular OS all my life and then contemplated the use of a different one, I would want to know what benefit it held for me. Since many people still hold the false notion that Macs are 'toy' computers and are useful only for making home movies and listening to iTunes it's worth asking the question (from his point of view) if he, as a systems engineer, could gain any advantage in using this new OS over his old one.
     
  20. nsbio macrumors 6502a

    nsbio

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    #20
    For the tasks you are describing, either OS X or Windows will be fine for you, especially that you are well versed in the latter. Mac allows you to run both, plus you get the cuteness factor of the Mac hardware and software. Rationally, there is no reason to switch for you, but the choice is usually driven by something more than just the rational. By the same token, there is no rational reason to buy a BMW 330 over Honda Civic, and yet...
     
  21. grovertdog macrumors regular

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    #21
    That's cool, and certainly your prerogative. For good or bad, I am surrounded by computer engineers and IT guys in my workplace, and have a pretty familiar level of discourse with them. Not even the greenest I've dealt with would pose such an open ended, unqualified question, but just because that is my experience doesn't mean it applies across the board. (honestly though, I continue to believe this cat is in no way an "engineer", but I'll keep that one to myself from here on :cool:...

    I think the tide has really turned regarding the "toy"/niche preconception surronding Macs, thanks primarily to OS/X. We can leave that moniker to the Amiga folks! :D
     
  22. mm1250 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 3, 2007
    #22
    Thanks for the reponse all..

    Like I said, I'm getting pretty close to closing in on the Macbook Pro. Thinking of buying a new one around OCt-Nov. I was considering just buying the OS to install on my windows machine under Vmware or something like that but it seems from what you guys say, its not possible.

    I did goto the online Mac store to look for Refurbed Mac Minis, but couldn't find any for the $200ish price like you guys said, or else I would be buying now. Do they go on and off the online store as they get new inventory.
     
  23. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #23
    $429 is the cheapest refurb mini. They go on at around 5:00AM EST and are usually sold out within 6 hours. Some days there is nothing at all.
     
  24. Masquerade macrumors 6502a

    Masquerade

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    #24
    :confused:
     
  25. elcerrito494 macrumors member

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    #25
    Hey grovertdog! Why don't you just shut the hell up?
     

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