iPod Thinking of replacing the classic with a new Touch

venom600

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Mar 23, 2003
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706
Los Angeles, CA
My library in iTunes is at roughly 165GB thanks to a ton of ALAC files. Up until now, the only way to get an iPod larger than 160GB was to buy a Classic and swap the HD for a larger SD card. Now there's a 256GB iPod Touch with all the benefits of the iOS music interface (say what you will, but it's significantly better at managing large libraries than the old click wheel), Wifi so you never have to connect it to your computer, and bluetooth for use with new headphones. The price even seems reasonable for the storage at $399. Why shouldn't I put the Classic to bed finally and upgrade? Are there any benefits of the Classic over the Touch anymore?
 

MattA

macrumors 6502
May 15, 2006
409
119
Orlando, FL
The only benefit that I can think of with the Classic over the Touch is the ability to change tracks without looking on the Classic. It's easier to navigate when you can't look, unless you have some sort of remote (apple watch might get around that with the music app). I've thought about the new Touch pretty hard just because of the large size and low price.
 
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Ferc Kast

macrumors 6502
Sep 26, 2012
319
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Ohio, USA
The only benefit that I can think of with the Classic over the Touch is the ability to change tracks without looking on the Classic. It's easier to navigate when you can't look, unless you have some sort of remote (apple watch might get around that with the music app). I've thought about the new Touch pretty hard just because of the large size and low price.
Apple Watch only interacts with the iPhone, and not with the new Touch.
 
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VirtuallyInsane

macrumors member
Nov 16, 2018
50
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I use my classic for all my music stored in iTunes thats not from Apple Music and I use the touch for music that’s synced to Apple Music. That makes sense for me.
 

WilliamDu

macrumors regular
May 22, 2012
240
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Definitely worth buying the 7th. I have maxed out my two 160GB aging Classics and the new generation with 256GB Silver gives me more than enough room and some years to enjoy over 15,000 and growing tracks with my fantastic $50 TaoTronics bluetooth noise canceling phones as well as sending my music to the Alexa Echos and Dots around the house. All that and the other IOS apps as well. What's not to like?
The processor is plenty fast enough for iPod apps, and who needs a huge, expensive, current iPhone cluttering up your pocket.
The Apple EarPods that come with it aren't bad, but can't compete with the TaoTronics, particularly if you have to use hearing aids as I do. Can't use the pods but the Phones are great. Plus the Alexa gnomes probable enjoy listening to my music instead of people's inane chatter.
I have a simple, flip phone that just talks, and probably won't fry my brain as some studies allege the new iPhones may be doing.
The Touch can access Recently Added which the Classic cannot.
I also got a revelation with new Hearing Aids which accept stereo streaming from the Touch while still functioning great as Hearing Aids. Sound just as good as best EarPods I've found. Too bad you have to be pretty deaf to get them.
 
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Traverse

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While the iPod classic is iconic, the touch really is superior at navigating large libraries. It's only drawback is no physical play/pause function.

You can highly customize the iPod touch's U.I. to make it a music-only device and it becomes a joy to use. I can launch most of my playlists without even unlocking the device via a Shortcuts widget and I plan to fill my blank home screen with shortcut icons to launch other items. Kind of like making my own U.I. Plus, I love playlist images. There are also a wealth of music apps like Cs Music if you dislike the native iOS Music app. Miximum is also an amazing iOS app by the Cs developer that lets you make smart playlists on iOS.

Here are a few screenshots in case that's useful.

IMG_0043.PNG IMG_0044.PNG IMG_0045.PNG IMG_0046.PNG IMG_0047.PNG IMG_0048.PNG IMG_0049.PNG
 

sracer

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Apr 9, 2010
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Prescott Valley, AZ
While the iPod classic is iconic, the touch really is superior at navigating large libraries. It's only drawback is no physical play/pause function.

You can highly customize the iPod touch's U.I. to make it a music-only device and it becomes a joy to use. I can launch most of my playlists without even unlocking the device via a Shortcuts widget and I plan to fill my blank home screen with shortcut icons to launch other items. Kind of like making my own U.I. Plus, I love playlist images. There are also a wealth of music apps like Cs Music if you dislike the native iOS Music app. Miximum is also an amazing iOS app by the Cs developer that lets you make smart playlists on iOS.

Here are a few screenshots in case that's useful.

View attachment 885611 View attachment 885612 View attachment 885613 View attachment 885614 View attachment 885615 View attachment 885616 View attachment 885617
You've made a well-reasoned argument. And if I were the type that could "set it and forget it" and not tinker with play/pause, advancing a track or replaying a track, I would agree.

For me, physical button are more important than a touchscreen because of the need to interact with the track being played as well as bouncing around my collection. In some ways, physical controls on a media player have a similar tactile satisfaction as playing records on a turntable.

I've actually gone the opposite as this thread is titled... just yesterday, I received a 30GB 5th Gen iPod Classic (bought it off eBay, $45 w/brand new battery installed). It will be replacing my iPod Touch. (eventually, the harddrive will be replaced by a 128GB SSD)

I find the click-wheel interface very easy to navigate and the scroll-wheel control is more accurate and sensitive in adjusting volume and skimming a track than the sliders found on iOS music player apps.

I make heavy use of smart playlists... something I think most people don't use or know enough about to really put it to good use. This allows me to have dynamic "views" of my collection.

As good as smart playlists are, they're not as good as the "channels" on Sony's SensMe music player for the Playstation Portable.

Having said that, I would love to see Apple take the latest mobile tech hardware and software and make a device that is optimized and dedicated to media playback... an iPod for the next generation.
 

retta283

macrumors 68020
Jun 8, 2018
2,024
1,810
Kingman, AZ
For me a Touch would not cut it, but I can definitely see the appeal. Not enough handsfree control, and too easy to shatter.

If you are able to do something similar to what @Traverse has done, it will be much more capable.
[automerge]1577796991[/automerge]
You've made a well-reasoned argument. And if I were the type that could "set it and forget it" and not tinker with play/pause, advancing a track or replaying a track, I would agree.

For me, physical button are more important than a touchscreen because of the need to interact with the track being played as well as bouncing around my collection. In some ways, physical controls on a media player have a similar tactile satisfaction as playing records on a turntable.

I've actually gone the opposite as this thread is titled... just yesterday, I received a 30GB 5th Gen iPod Classic (bought it off eBay, $45 w/brand new battery installed). It will be replacing my iPod Touch. (eventually, the harddrive will be replaced by a 128GB SSD)

I find the click-wheel interface very easy to navigate and the scroll-wheel control is more accurate and sensitive in adjusting volume and skimming a track than the sliders found on iOS music player apps.

I make heavy use of smart playlists... something I think most people don't use or know enough about to really put it to good use. This allows me to have dynamic "views" of my collection.

As good as smart playlists are, they're not as good as the "channels" on Sony's SensMe music player for the Playstation Portable.

Having said that, I would love to see Apple take the latest mobile tech hardware and software and make a device that is optimized and dedicated to media playback... an iPod for the next generation.
I definitely prefer changing volume on a click wheel, it's hard to get it right with a touchscreen. I think the best way it could be done is a click wheel for more precise changes, and up/down buttons for quicker and more standard changes.
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
53,416
36,620
The Far Horizon
While the iPod classic is iconic, the touch really is superior at navigating large libraries. It's only drawback is no physical play/pause function.

You can highly customize the iPod touch's U.I. to make it a music-only device and it becomes a joy to use. I can launch most of my playlists without even unlocking the device via a Shortcuts widget and I plan to fill my blank home screen with shortcut icons to launch other items. Kind of like making my own U.I. Plus, I love playlist images. There are also a wealth of music apps like Cs Music if you dislike the native iOS Music app. Miximum is also an amazing iOS app by the Cs developer that lets you make smart playlists on iOS.

Here are a few screenshots in case that's useful.

View attachment 885611 View attachment 885612 View attachment 885613 View attachment 885614 View attachment 885615 View attachment 885616 View attachment 885617
You've made a well-reasoned argument. And if I were the type that could "set it and forget it" and not tinker with play/pause, advancing a track or replaying a track, I would agree.

For me, physical button are more important than a touchscreen because of the need to interact with the track being played as well as bouncing around my collection. In some ways, physical controls on a media player have a similar tactile satisfaction as playing records on a turntable.

I've actually gone the opposite as this thread is titled... just yesterday, I received a 30GB 5th Gen iPod Classic (bought it off eBay, $45 w/brand new battery installed). It will be replacing my iPod Touch. (eventually, the harddrive will be replaced by a 128GB SSD)

I find the click-wheel interface very easy to navigate and the scroll-wheel control is more accurate and sensitive in adjusting volume and skimming a track than the sliders found on iOS music player apps.

I make heavy use of smart playlists... something I think most people don't use or know enough about to really put it to good use. This allows me to have dynamic "views" of my collection.

As good as smart playlists are, they're not as good as the "channels" on Sony's SensMe music player for the Playstation Portable.

Having said that, I would love to see Apple take the latest mobile tech hardware and software and make a device that is optimized and dedicated to media playback... an iPod for the next generation.

Two terrific, thoughtful and well written posts.

Thank you for taking the time to write and post them.
 
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Traverse

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You've made a well-reasoned argument. And if I were the type that could "set it and forget it" and not tinker with play/pause, advancing a track or replaying a track, I would agree.

For me, physical button are more important than a touchscreen because of the need to interact with the track being played as well as bouncing around my collection. In some ways, physical controls on a media player have a similar tactile satisfaction as playing records on a turntable.

I would have loved it if they brought the iPod nano's physical controls to the iPod touch, but I can see why they didn't want to alter the physical design.

While note as good as on some dedicated players, the iPod nano's controls allowed for volume, play/pause, and skip/replay in an Apple-y compromised design (I would have preferred if they were all separate buttons rather than the rocker, but it was better than nothing.

Photo Jul 18, 6 54 12 PM.jpg
 
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retta283

macrumors 68020
Jun 8, 2018
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Kingman, AZ
Guys, the iPod touch has had physical volume up/volume down buttons since the 2nd generation model (released September 2008). They are just like iPhone volume control buttons: on the left edge of the case.
That's not enough for a dedicated music device though. You'd need at the very least a play/pause button, and a change track button.
 

retta283

macrumors 68020
Jun 8, 2018
2,024
1,810
Kingman, AZ
Well, the iPod touch was never intended to be a dedicated music player. It's a multi-purpose device.

In any case, you are wasting your time complaining about it. Apple isn't going to release another music player gadget and no one is going to see additional music control buttons on an iPod touch.

Just use the controls on your headphones/earphones/earbuds like the rest of the world does.

Remember that goofy iPod dongle that had music controls? Well, that thing is long gone, isn't coming back.
It's all speculative discussion, not complaining... My post wasn't directly talking about the touch, just stating that if you were to add a volume rocker to a new iPod it wouldn't be enough for it to be up/down. There's a reason the last Nano had that middle button with multiple functions.

That iPod dongle was an FM receiver, I'm not entirely sure why they put that little control pad on it though.
My headphones are almost 40 years old, they have no controls on the wire whatsoever...
 

ftaok

macrumors 603
Jan 23, 2002
6,217
1,251
East Coast
To each their own, but for me, the iPod touch is not a good device. For around the same price, you can get a 256GB iPhone and use it with an unactivated SIM card. The benefits are a bigger screen (if getting a 7 or 8), a replaceable and larger battery, better repairability, ability to use with Apple Watch.
 

Traverse

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Mar 11, 2013
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To each their own, but for me, the iPod touch is not a good device. For around the same price, you can get a 256GB iPhone and use it with an unactivated SIM card. The benefits are a bigger screen (if getting a 7 or 8), a replaceable and larger battery, better repairability, ability to use with Apple Watch.
The smallness is the iPod touch is actually one of the selling points for a music player. A used iPhone 7 is significantly larger and heavier.
 

ftaok

macrumors 603
Jan 23, 2002
6,217
1,251
East Coast
The smallness is the iPod touch is actually one of the selling points for a music player. A used iPhone 7 is significantly larger and heavier.
That is the only advantage of an iPod touch. The SE is only a little thicker than a touch and maintains nearly all of the advantages of an iPhone 7. They do seem to be difficult to find with 256gb.
 

BugeyeSTI

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Aug 19, 2017
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I’ve heard the DAC in the 5th gen classic is better than any versions of the the Touch .. I’m just waiting for my 30gb HD to take a dump before upgrading to a 128 SSD. Besides, I love the looks and interface

owned since new 5.5 classic video(I think I bought it in 2006?) and still looks great
E8CDC378-6692-4DD8-B758-80DFDACE323E.jpeg
 
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sracer

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Apr 9, 2010
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I’ve heard the DAC in the 5th gen classic is better than any versions of the the Touch .. I’m just waiting for my 30gb HD to take a dump before upgrading to a 128 SSD. Besides, I love the looks and interface

owned since new 5.5 classic video(I think I bought it in 2006?) and still looks great
View attachment 886525
I read that the 5.5 gen is the best and 5 is in 2nd place... after spending some time listening to my 5 I can confirm that it is noticeably better than my ipod touches and nanos.
 

TokMok3

macrumors 6502a
Aug 22, 2015
626
399
I would have loved it if they brought the iPod nano's physical controls to the iPod touch, but I can see why they didn't want to alter the physical design.

While note as good as on some dedicated players, the iPod nano's controls allowed for volume, play/pause, and skip/replay in an Apple-y compromised design (I would have preferred if they were all separate buttons rather than the rocker, but it was better than nothing.

View attachment 885852


Since I bought my iPod Video Enhanced 5.5 I have been listening to music without interruptions, no messages, no phone calls, nothing... in fact this little device has displaced my iPhone X from the first place with respect to technology. Another thing is the shuffle in the iPod Video is superior than the shuffle in the iPhone. In fact, the Music App in the iPhone is a piece of trash. That reason alone is enough to have a iPod Classic for those moments when one want to enjoy music without distractions like in the old days.
 
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Strangedream

macrumors 6502a
Sep 15, 2019
551
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Singapore
I read that the 5.5 gen is the best and 5 is in 2nd place... after spending some time listening to my 5 I can confirm that it is noticeably better than my ipod touches and nanos.

Most folks prefer the sound of Wolfson DAC over Cirrus'. Some early nanos also use Wolfson chips. I think it's more of a marketing trick from gray market resellers tho; personally I can't tell the difference unless I use certain high-end earphones.
 
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