This Article! The iPhone is not for Photographers


BigMovieGeek

macrumors regular
May 22, 2010
149
17
I completely agree with every word in the article. My full frame sensors and professional lenses beat the cr*p out of any phone's camera. There's just no comparison. They do however say that the best camera is the one in your hand, so that's where the iphone excels.
 
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Cryates

macrumors 68020
Nov 19, 2013
2,435
2,803
Chattanooga, TN
I think photographers realize they shouldn't rely on a phone for their profession however 99.9% of the world could do just fine in daily life with an iPhone camera.
 

spazma7ik

macrumors 6502a
Sep 12, 2009
913
330
Pfft, I'm not a professional photographer but I do enjoy it as a hobby (solely on the iPhone mind you) and I've shot and edited photos on my iPhone that would probably blow you away.
 

tgi

macrumors 65816
Aug 29, 2012
1,186
126
Article is a waste of time.

"The iPhone is a great camera for a phone, but it is NOT a great camera."

The iPhone is a a phone after all. So if it has a good camera for a phone, why complain at all?
 

rambo47

macrumors 6502a
Oct 3, 2010
589
101
Denville, NJ
In general, phones are not for photographers. Not serious ones anyway. Even the Lumia 1020 with it's 41MP resolution was flawed with incredible lag between shots.
 

Surf Monkey

macrumors 68030
Oct 3, 2010
2,669
435
Portland, OR
In general, phones are not for photographers. Not serious ones anyway. Even the Lumia 1020 with it's 41MP resolution was flawed with incredible lag between shots.
Nonsense. Any good photographer can use whatever camera is available to make good images, from a shoebox pin-hole camera all the way up to the latest and greatest large format digital or film camera and lenses. Good photography is NOT about the camera. Good photography is about the PHOTOGRAPHER.

I'm a pro photographer and while I've never used my iPhone for my work I use it for personal photography all the time. Why? Because I have it with me all the time.
 

FrankySavvy

macrumors 65816
Mar 4, 2010
1,288
273
Long Island, NY
Nonsense. Any good photographer can use whatever camera is available to make good images, from a shoebox pin-hole camera all the way up to the latest and greatest large format digital or film camera and lenses. Good photography is NOT about the camera. Good photography is about the PHOTOGRAPHER.

I'm a pro photographer and while I've never used my iPhone for my work I use it for personal photography all the time. Why? Because I have it with me all the time.
I COMPLETELY AGREE!

Its capturing the moment, getting the lighting right, a good photographer is a good photographer no matter what camera they are using. Just like Jimi Hendrix was a great guitar player whether he was playing a $3000 guitar or one he picked up from the 5 and dime.
 

javaGuru

macrumors 6502a
Jul 15, 2007
798
38
I'm a photographer and I use my iPhone on a regular basis to take photos which I post online. Some of my iPhone photos have even made it to popular on 500px. There is also an entire genre of photography dedicated to taking photos using an iPhone called iPhoneography that is extremely popular. I know a few of the top photographers periodically post photos using their iPhones as well. Thomas Hawk is one of these.

That being said, I would never use my iPhone on a professional photo shoot. I would prefer to use a full frame or camera of similar quality instead. I prefer to use my Fuji x100s or my full frame Sony A7 when out and about.

This is one of my photos that I posted to 500px.
http://500px.com/photo/51038134/sunset-marsh-by-will-hucks?from=user_library
 

accountforit

macrumors 6502a
Jan 22, 2014
676
0
Which is why point and shoot cameras are disappearing.
Are they really? People are still willing to pay $700 for a Sony RX100 point and shoot so I would beg to differ. That's more than an entry level DSLR. That should show you how inferior the camera in the iPhone really is.
 

d.steve

macrumors 6502
Jan 6, 2012
252
70
Are they really? People are still willing to pay $700 for a Sony RX100 point and shoot so I would beg to differ. That's more than an entry level DSLR. That should show you how inferior the camera in the iPhone really is.
Sony RX100 doesn't prove that P&S has been disappearing. It is only proof that it has not gone extinct, but no one is trying to argue that.

I think if you look at current popular P&S cameras, it rather shows that P&S has fragmented, where the lower end is being absorbed by phones and the higher end is continuing along the path of RX100 and competitors.
 

Surf Monkey

macrumors 68030
Oct 3, 2010
2,669
435
Portland, OR
Are they really? People are still willing to pay $700 for a Sony RX100 point and shoot so I would beg to differ. That's more than an entry level DSLR. That should show you how inferior the camera in the iPhone really is.
The RX100 is FAR from the rank and file P&S camera of years gone by. Pocket cameras are not going away. What's going away are small sensor, fully automatic "Facebook"'cameras. The mid to low end of pocket cameras. The upper end (represented by cameras like the RX100, the higher end Lumix cams, the SX and G series Canons, the Fuji X30 and so forth) are just going to grow stronger as the casual photographer is stripped out of the market and manufacturers are increasingly free to focus on their more advanced buyers.
 

Surf Monkey

macrumors 68030
Oct 3, 2010
2,669
435
Portland, OR
Point and shoot business is down.
Yeah, but "point and shoot" isn't an accurate description of a specific product class. Within "point and shoot" you find a whole range of pocket cameras, only some of which are struggling, vis a vis the small sensor, auto mode only type cams. The more versatile, larger sensor pocket cameras are actually doing quite well right now.
 

I7guy

macrumors Core
Nov 30, 2013
20,383
8,212
Gotta be in it to win it
Nonsense. Any good photographer can use whatever camera is available to make good images, from a shoebox pin-hole camera all the way up to the latest and greatest large format digital or film camera and lenses. Good photography is NOT about the camera. Good photography is about the PHOTOGRAPHER.

I'm a pro photographer and while I've never used my iPhone for my work I use it for personal photography all the time. Why? Because I have it with me all the time.
The art if photography is distinct from the technical aspects of knowing how to photograph various scenes. But if you can't capture the shot you want due technical limitations with the device you have on you you understand it's as much about what is in front of your eyes as behind the camera.
 

Surf Monkey

macrumors 68030
Oct 3, 2010
2,669
435
Portland, OR
The art if photography is distinct from the technical aspects of knowing how to photograph various scenes. But if you can't capture the shot you want due technical limitations with the device you have on you you understand it's as much about what is in front of your eyes as behind the camera.
Works both ways. If you're too inept to operate a simple phone camera no amount of feature upgrades is going to help.

The point is that any camera is only as good as the photographer holding it. Take OIS for example. A lot of people, judging by the posts here, think of it as if it's a sharpening tool or a way to stop action in a shot. But it doesn't work like that. It gives you an artificially steady hand. Like putting your camera on a tripod. If you don't have a basic understanding of what a tool like that can do and how best to use it you're still going to get a dodgy result. HOWEVER, if you're like what I assume is a pretty large percentage of iPhone users and have an average or better than average grasp of how to use them these kinds of upgrades become very significant, because when used right things like OIS and phase detection pixels will get you the shot you wouldn't have gotten before. Whether it not that shot is any GOOD in terms of content and composition is all up to the photographer.

In short, the sharper, more color accurate, better focused picture you take with the "improved" camera is still going to suck if you don't know where, when and how to point that lens and click the shutter.
 

AndroidKing

macrumors newbie
Sep 10, 2014
19
0
No phones are, being the small sizes they and the camera lenses have to be. Physics won't allow it.
 

lf911sc

macrumors newbie
Aug 26, 2014
4
0
This Article!!! The iPhone is NOT for Photographers

Why would anyone think that the iPhone would advance photography?