This is not a question about Aperture vs. Lightroom. I promise!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by soco, May 9, 2013.

  1. soco macrumors 68030

    soco

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Location:
    Yardley, PA
    #1
    Mods, feel free to delete this once answered, but I was looking at the threads that are stickied about Aperture vs. Lightroom and noticed that they're all from around 2008.

    Is there any more current discussion, as things have changed quite a bit?

    More to the point, I've only recently begun to even learn about post-processing, and I just feel like that battle now includes things like iPhoto on the iPad (seems very convenient) and I hear there's a version of Lightroom coming for iOS too.

    What would be a good go-to for someone who needs a portable solution (and has an iPad 4 on him at all times) and who just wants to do basics (ie. not doing wacky HDRs)?
     
  2. ijohn.8.80 macrumors 65816

    ijohn.8.80

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    Location:
    Adelaide, Oztwaylya.
    #2
    There's many here that are far more knowledgable than I, but, I'll get the ball rolling... :eek:

    If you are shooting in RAW and feel even remotely interested in learning to pull the most out of your pictures, work on a laptop as the minimum with Aperture, Photoshop, Lightroom or even DxO Optics Pro 8 or Perfect Photo Suite 7. They all have a learning curve attached to getting the most from them, but it is worth the investment of time and effort.

    It's only been the last three months or so for me to be seriously focused on getting more from my post work and I need my graphic tablet and 27" iMac to work effectively. I can import into Photo Mechanic on my 15" MBP, but, I don't edit until I get home to the big girl. I do tether with my MBP for focus stacking in macro, architectural and landscape pieces.

    As you get more and more into it, even if only doing B&W street shots, you will need fine control of masks, I doubt you will be able to achieve this on an iPad.

    As I initially said there are many more here that are way longer in the tooth than I, I'm a newbie too really. Listen to what they have to say and don't be scared to ask for further clarification if needed, there's no such thing as a stupid question, apart from the ones that remain unasked.
     
  3. soco thread starter macrumors 68030

    soco

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    Dec 14, 2009
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    Yardley, PA
    #3
    So, is the idea of doing all post on an iPad just not reasonable? I was really hoping to be able to do all of my post at work every day during my lunch hour, since I don't have much time at home. The possibility of doing it on an iPad is also really attractive due to the amazing quality of the screen, the processing power, its portability, and the fancy camera kit doo-dad I got. I can simply shoot, pull it out, import, edit, export, all while standing in the same place I shot (theoretically).
     
  4. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #4
    If you're serious about your work you'll do so on a color calibrated display. Can you calibrate an iPad? Fiddle with your snapshots on an iPad, I don't think that's a bad idea, but you'll want to see final output on a calibrated display unless you're just uploading them to various web forums for critique or possible praise. In that case, an iPad with Snapseed works well.

    I don't think an iPad allows for good workflow either. Workflow probably doesn't matter to someone new to photography, but the sooner you establish this, the better off you'll be.

    You can take this or leave it, I'm fairly certain I know which way you'll go in angst, but if you've ever shot more than 50 photos and really tried to create a workflow on an iPad then you'll see what I mean about the benefits of having a post-production workstation (laptop or desktop) at your disposal.

    With respects to iPhoto, it's a nice app but I'm not totally sold on it, yet.
     
  5. fivedots macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    #5
    Great answers from John and Jessica above.

    That said, I think photographers have become far too wrapped up in the idea of shooting RAW. Don't get me wrong, RAW has many benefits over JPEG. But JPEGs can look awesome. If shooting RAW throws a significant wrench in your ability to post process images and desired workflow, then I say shoot JPEG, edit on your iPad, and enjoy your photography. JPEG images that are processed and posted online are far better than a hard drive full of RAW images you haven't gotten around to yet.

    Don't get bogged down in the technology and let it take the fun out of it for you. The most important thing as a new photographer you can do is get out there and shoot.

    Admittedly, I shoot RAW because I feel like I have to. And everyday I wonder if I'd be happier shooting black and white film with a 50mm and sending it off to a lab for processing.
     
  6. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #6
    I shoot RAW because I feel like I really want that control over the image as I once had in the darkroom. It is probably more in my head because you are correct, JPEGs out of camera probably look good enough to just about everyone not looking to do print work. RAW does allow me to correct for difficult lighting situations where I couldn't control it pre-shot. I still tend to try and shoot right instead of shoot wrong and process right. If that makes sense.
     
  7. fivedots macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    #7
    Definitely does make sense and you are absolutely correct in saying that you've got far more latitude to work with in the RAW file. I would hate to capture the best scene of my life but not be able to recover some blown highlights, etc. I say "because I have to" simply because I know I'd be kicking myself in that situation. Just dreaming of a world of blissful ignorance. I would argue that JPEGs are plenty fine for most printing situations that an amateur photographer would encounter as well.

    I think everybody needs to shoot what works best for them and not get wrapped up in what they should be doing. I see so many newcomers get wrapped up in the gear and post side of things all the while getting their butts kicked by somebody with an iPhone and an experience eye.
     
  8. soco thread starter macrumors 68030

    soco

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    Dec 14, 2009
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    Yardley, PA
    #8
    I'd imagine you can't color calibrate an iPad, but maybe if it's jailbroken? I'd have to look into it. I know on my iPhone I've seen a couple things on Cydia for calibration, so maybe.

    For the time being, my goal after post is to upload for critique so I can start getting an idea of areas that need improvement.

    Not the first time I've heard that advice. I think I'd agree that I want to establish a "proper" workflow earlier on.

    I don't get the angst part. Are you suggesting I'll not do what's best for me because I'm afraid of putting in the legwork to learn the harder way? If I had that tendency, I'd have not asked the question to begin with.

    What you said actually has a lot of merit to it, so I'm taking your advice.
    Thanks! :)

    Definitely spot on there. Alas, the interwebs are mostly the place to discuss gear, post, and the like, because that's where most of the gearheads live lol

    Trust me, when I start to develop a better sense of all that I'm learning with regard to composition, style, and generally the artistic side of the craft, there will be much more to discuss there.
     
  9. fivedots macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    #9
    Definitely, and that wasn't a comment about you. Your question is very valid and worth asking.

    My comments are as much about myself as anybody else. I've been through it all and find time and time again I get caught up on the post side of things, whether it is finding the time to do it or making the many, many decisions that must be made throughout the process. I know the post process like the back of my hand but I nonetheless find the time in front of the computer the least enjoyable aspect of photography. Others love it.

    As a hobbiest I think it's crucial to find that balance between "best practices" and "Hey, I'm enjoying this!" Some days I feel that some of my best images were shot on black and white film.
     
  10. soco thread starter macrumors 68030

    soco

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    Dec 14, 2009
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    Yardley, PA
    #10
    Yeah, I hear that a lot, and I'm trying to avoid it as early on as possible. I get a lot of enjoyment out of shooting, and so far, none from post. I've taken thousands of shots already, and only even bothered putting maybe 8 on flickr or anything like that. Mostly because I just don't think they're worthy of it yet. Even of the 8 I posted, I only like 1. The others were for critique.
     
  11. fivedots, May 9, 2013
    Last edited: May 9, 2013

    fivedots macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    Yeah. It's funny because I think that two of my most enjoyable photographic experiences were also the most limiting. The first being with with Kodak Tri-X 400 and a fixed 50mm and the second - and I'll take some heat for saying this - Instagram. The fixed lens, restricted aspect ration, and limited post processing options really forced me to stop, think, and focus on my composition. I thought about the image rather than whether or not I was using the right lens or adding enough saturation in post, and so on. Plus the forced workflow of shoot, edit, and share meant that I was actually getting things done.

    A crazy part of part of me wants to commit to shooting JPEG on an X100s and be merry. I've already downsized from DSLR to m43 and am much happier.
     
  12. snberk103 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #12
    There is a lot of good comments above, some better than others, imho.

    This is my standard advice. Ask yourself "why am I taking this picture?". Answer that question. Generally, I am asking people "why" when we are talking about composition, but I believe it can applied to the whole process.

    This can be a very difficult question to answer, conceptually, because it forces you analyze what is often just vague notions. However, equipment purchases should be based on good common sense.

    If your intent is to take photos that are stunningly lifelike when printed as 30"x40"s (that is really big for you metricized folks) then no - doing post on an iPad is probably not going to work. Conversely if, it is more about the process of creation than the final work... then maybe an iPad will work. Ask David Hockney.

    If your intent is to create images that will only ever be displayed on an iPad, then sure - an iPad is an appropriate tool. Usually the image quality is limited by the least capable link in the chain from Camera to Final Display Medium (This chain includes the photographer's abilities).

    If you are planning on taking only a few photos at a time, then workflow is not really a major consideration. If you take 300 images per project, that then need to catalogued and categorized - then workflow is probably a consideration.

    Photographers often pay way too much attention to Image Quality, at the expense of Emotional Quality, Compositional Quality, and Message Quality sometimes. Look at some of the early Doisneau's, for example. It is a good idea to maximize the IQ (within the limits of your processes) - but not at the expense of the other Qs. Except when sub-par IQ gets in the way of the appreciating the image. Especially if you are shooting for yourself. If you are shooting for a client, IQ is often paramount. But not always.

    Just have fun, and show your images. Don't be too hard on yourself. Photographers are often their own worst editors. No one can see that one bad pixel, trust me. Except for that one annoying damn photographer who comes to your shows and points it out everyone. Should be banned... :)

    Some of my favourite photographers use very unsophisticated equipment to produce very sophisticated art. Old polaroid cameras, home made pinhole cameras, etc. Just have fun, and ignore everyone who says you are doing it wrong. Post your photos and pay attention to the advice of people who create photos you like to look at. And then only if they can both good and bad in your photos.

    Good Luck.
     
  13. fivedots macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 29, 2011
    #13
    Brilliant comment. Enjoy your images.
     

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