Thunderbolt to Ethernet adaptor

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by macNwindow, Jan 18, 2014.

  1. macNwindow macrumors member

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    Apr 7, 2013
    #1
    Is it just me or is the adaptor creating heat when in-use. Seems kinda abnormal... :confused:
     
  2. DHagan4755 macrumors 6502a

    DHagan4755

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    #2
    Yep it gets warm. Perfectly normal. There's actually a Broadcom chip in there.
     
  3. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #3
    Normal. Any Thunderbolt cable will get hot because there's a chip in it.

    That's also the reason why Thunderbolt cables are so expensive.
     
  4. Zeov macrumors 6502a

    Zeov

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    #4
    had it running for three days at a LAN party pretty much non-stop, absolutely no problems, and when you're 17 people cramped into a rather small room, everything gets hot, and it wasn't an issue.

    don't worry.
     
  5. macNwindow thread starter macrumors member

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    #5
    Thank you for letting me know.
     
  6. macNwindow thread starter macrumors member

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    #6
    Yeah, the price for the thing was outrageous, but i needed it. Where i'm at, the wifi is always getting dc'd.
     
  7. sjinsjca, Jan 19, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2014

    sjinsjca macrumors 68000

    sjinsjca

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    #7
    Translation, please. "dc'd" = ?

    Oh, and the functionality of the adaptor is exactly equivalent to a PCIe Ethernet card. Its price isn't out of line considering that, as it integrates the same circuitry. It would have been much cheaper to build Ethernet into the laptop, of course, but the size of the Ethernet port itself was the issue-- thin is in when it comes to laptops, and very few laptop users use Ethernet anymore. So, it was an easy choice to relegate Ethernet functionality to an external dongle hooked up to Thunderbolt's extension of the machine's PCIe bus. Same goes for VGA: bulky connector, diminishing use. (And, in VGA's case, there's a slimmer and better alternative: HDMI.)
     
  8. phyx macrumors member

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    #8

    DC = Disconnected
     
  9. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #9
    I never use Wifi to minimize EM radiation in my home. I only use Ethernet :)

    I only use Wifi at coffeeshops :p
     
  10. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #10
    I never noticed that to be honest, I'll have to go an check that out. I thought you were going to ask about how the TB adapter doesn't click in to the MBP but uses friction to stay connected to the Mac, which may disconnect due to the weight or position of the cable.
     
  11. macNwindow thread starter macrumors member

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    #11
    Nice to know! If I go mobile with my labtop, i just stick the adaptor into my bag and its not a problem to me at all. Some people complain about have to carry extra weight or stuff, but i just the adaptor is just like usb stick that is necessary to carry with you at all times.

    Do you believe that EM radiation effect your brain/body? Are you doing it for security purposes?

    I won't ever connect my wifi over public Wifi's. It seems very vulnerable to me.

    Yeah check it out, it takes a few minutes to heat up if you are just booting up. My adaptor just sits on my desk, how is yours hanging?

    The adaptor to me doesn't seems like to static friction is to low. I think that by having it not click in, we won't have to apply much force to take it out. Observe your ports around the TB, to me it is pretty cramped, and i would hate to force out a TB and bend/break another port being used.
     
  12. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

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    #12
    It gets hot because the Thundebolt logic plus a Ethernet adapter produces heat.

    Heck, my Thunderbolt cables get hot by themselves!
     
  13. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #13
    It's for both health and security.

    At coffeeshops, I only use Wifi for social networks and web browsing. For anything else, such as emails or transactions, I stick back to my Ethernet at home.
     
  14. Freyqq, Jan 20, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014

    Freyqq macrumors 68040

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    #14
    I'm curious as to your reasoning on the perceived health issue. Microwaves (used in wifi) carry less energy on the EM spectrum than visible light, and the antennas for commercial routers are under a watt in power intensity. Based on that, a standard lightbulb should be more dangerous than a wireless router. The reason why the microwaves used to cook food work the way they do is because of the close physical proximity to the food and the fact that they are putting out closer to 1000 watts of energy. That being said, what health risk are you aware of with wifi?
     
  15. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #15
    What about research that shows that leaving wifi on has a marked effect on decreased fertility?
     
  16. Freyqq macrumors 68040

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    #16
    All I know about it is from a physics and technology standpoint, not medical knowledge. Physics suggests that consumer wifi would be sending out less energy than a regular lightbulb. I don't understand how wifi could cause harm when no person would complain about the harmful effects of a lightbulb.

    That's news to me, if accurate. What journal is it published in, is it corroborated by other jornal articles, what's the sample size and methods, ect. I am highly skeptical. Just because someone got an article published does not always mean that it is true.
     
  17. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    #17
    It appeared in an NYT article.
     
  18. Freyqq macrumors 68040

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    #18
  19. thundersteele macrumors 68030

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    #19
    I guess the argument one could try to make is that the lower frequency radio waves permeate the skin deeper and might therefore cause damage in more sensitive regions of the body.
    On the other hand, as you already said (and also confirmed by the Princeton article), the amount of energy carried by the radio waves is too small to cause any measurable heating, and the frequency is too low to directly cause any modifications to molecules in the body... so it seems very unlikely that there is an adverse effect from WiFi exposure.

    The other issue of course is that WiFi hasn't been around all that long, so nobody can really make any definite statements about long term (30 years +) exposure. Anyways I guess that if you don't need WiFi, you can at least save on the electricity bill by using the ethernet ;)
     
  20. Freyqq, Jan 21, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2014

    Freyqq macrumors 68040

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    #20
    Gigabit ethernet is faster and better than wifi from a transfer speed standpoint. It's great technology, and there are plenty of reasons to use it over wifi. I don't think health is one of them though lol. If I were the concerned type, I would be far more concerned by the radiation exposure of standing outside during the daytime.
     
  21. snaky69 macrumors 603

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    #21
    What about electromagnetic fields around every single live electrical wire in your house? You don't happen to live near high voltage lines, do you? What about your cell phone? Your local radio stations broadcasting thousands of watts of radio waves? Cell phone towers? Police radar? TV satellites?

    Seriously, sitting out in the sun with UVA's UVB's which are on the borderline of ionizing radiation exposes you to more health risks than any of the aforementioned sources of electromagnetic energy.
     

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