TiBook G4 Chargers

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by A.Goldberg, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Location:
    Boston
    #1
    Hey Everyone,

    Question:

    Do all PowerBook G4's use the same charger? I'm looking to buy a 500mhz "Mercury" TiBook and Run OS9 on it but it doesn't come with a charger. Will any PowerBook G4 or iBook G3/G4 charger be compatible?

    I'm actually taking a gamble on this. $25, very good condition but no charger or hard drive. Guy who acquired it said it turns on but he doesn't have a charger. I guess it's worth a shot? I've been looking to start an OS9 experiment.

    Thanks!
     
  2. poiihy macrumors 68020

    poiihy

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2014
    #2
    All iBook/PowerBook chargers (except the really old PBs) use the same connector. The only difference is the maximum wattage so you may have problems using an iBook charger on a PowerBook. I don't think the battery would charge when it is on but will if it is off or sleeping.
     
  3. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2014
    #3
    The iBook G3 Clamshell uses the same connector as the "really old PBs" (PowerBook G3s).

    ----------

    OP: This post should help answer your question.

     
  4. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #4
    If using a white Apple charger, you MUST have a 45 watt for the TiBook. The reason is that the plug "barrel" on the 65 watt chargers is slightly larger, and the hinges on the TiBook prevent it from plugging in.

    The generic aftermarket 45/65 watt chargers work fine on a Ti.
     
  5. A.Goldberg thread starter macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Location:
    Boston
    #5
    Thanks for the info!

    I remembered the chargers not being compatible back in the day (OEM Apple power adapters) but then got confused when I saw the aftermarket models saying they were all the same.

    What about hard drive? What type do these require? If I'm running OS9 I can only go up to 128gb correct? Are there any compatible SSD drives (though I'm not sure if I want to spend the money on that)?
     
  6. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #6
    OS 9 doesn't have an issue with large drives-it's a function of the hard drive controller.

    Intell can give a much more detailed and specific answer than I, but the hard drive controller used in many Macs is capable of actually reading and supporting drives larger than 128gb. The caveat is that you generally need a software-based solution to "unlock" this feature. This creates something of a catch-22, as the software won't load until the OS is loaded. The work around is to have the first partition on the drive be less than 128gb, and install your OS only on that partition.

    You can also put a drive larger than 128gb in any Mac that doesn't natively support drives larger than this without any sort of 3rd party software-you just won't be able to access any of the space over 128gb.

    Other than that, you can use pretty much any 44-pin, 2.5" laptop IDE hard drive in your TiBook.

    I have a 100gb 7200rpm drive in one of my Tis, and it actually works fairly well and perks up the computer nicely. The caveats are that it sucks up a lot of battery power. I removed it from my 15" DLSD Powerbook, but like the TiBook the drive sits right under the trackpad and I also found the vibration from the drive uncomfortable in use.

    Three of my Aluminum PBs have SSDs in them(one of my 12", as well as my 15 and 17" DLSD). I use 128gb mSATA SSDs when I do an installation myself-I've been paying around $45-$50 each for new Toshiba drives in this capacity on Ebay. I then put them in this enclosure

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/321612695170?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT

    (Mods: Not my auction-just something I've bought and used), which I really like because it has the same form factory as a 2.5" IDE drive and literally is just a drop in replacement. I've also had these-briefly-in TiBooks, although mostly for testing and set-up and not for long term use. At least in those roles, they worked fine.

    From pretty extensive experience, I can say that these adapters have an "overehad" of about 8mb/s. Otherwise, I've found that they'll more or less saturate both an ATA66 bus(as in the TiBook) and an ATA100 bus(as in later Al books). This is based on Xbench testing, which consistently showed a maximum sequential read speed of about 8mb/s slower than the rated bus speed of pretty much every computer in which I've used these adapters.

    A good 7200 RPM HDD will get you close to saturating an ATA66 bus(I think I got mine up to about 50mb/s under certain operations when it was in my DLSD), but the SSD(unsurprisingly) does a lot better in random read/write operations. Of course, as I mentioned earlier, 7200rpm drives have their drawbacks in a laptop, and a most 4200rpm and 5400rpm drives(4200 was typical around the time the TiBook was built, although 5400 rpm is probably more common now) show a pretty big performance hit compared to an SSD or even a 7200 rpm drive.

    As budget permits, I plan on upgrading at least one Ti to an SSD for this exact reason. As I said, I could not possibly be happier with them in my much later Powerbooks.
     

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