Tilt shift attempt 1

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by G.T., Jun 4, 2010.

  1. G.T. macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    What do you think? I was looking at old photos and thought I'd try to get the effect, just messing around in Photoshop.

    [​IMG]

    No tilt shift lenses for micro 4/3rds as far as I know without adaptors.
     
  2. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

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    #2
    That's kind of jarring, in my opinion. I'm guessing you're looking for that "Lensbaby" effect (which isn't really what tilt-shift lenses are all about, but I understand that's the usage that floats around photo forums)?

    Anyway, in this one person's view the transition is significantly too abrupt.
     
  3. G.T. thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    Here are another couple of attempt at "miniature faking", have never realise people use the term tilt shift slightly wrong, I understand why people call it so though.

    Anyway:
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

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    #4
    I didn't phrase my response very well. It's not that it's "wrong", per se; but it's just such a specialized subset of what can be done. I've heard people complain "why spend $1700 on a tilt-shift lens for THAT?" and they're right - those miniaturization effects can be achieved easily with an inexpensive Lensbaby.

    When I think of tilt-shift lenses - and why I'm hoping to eventually buy one of the new Nikkors - I think of taking advantage of the Scheimpflug rule, and also about perspective control. Here are some examples of what I mean.

    Tilt-shift example "Spruce Cones" (it's the second photo on this page - its from Bjørn Rørslett's Nikon D3 review)

    Several different examples are in this Luminous Landscape article

    Addendum: I think with your last image you're close.
     
  5. G.T. thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Cool and Thanks
     
  6. Ruahrc macrumors 65816

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    #6
    I'm in total agreement with you here but is it true that the Lensbaby can do this effect? These "fake miniatures" is actually an application of the Scheimpflug rule, just that the lens is tilted the "wrong way". In that case, the Lensbaby would also be able to extend DOF by tilting in the opposite direction- but I think it is only capable of blurring the focus around a movable point, not actually changing the plane of focus.

    Otherwise, I would totally look into Lensbaby as a tool to get that huge DOF.

    Ruahrc
     
  7. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

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    #7
    I don't own a Lensbaby - but I believe you're correct in your description of what it does. Lensbaby utilizes a curved field of focus according to their website.

    When I look at those images, they don't look like they're utilizing a shifted/tilted focal plane. To me it looks more radial/oval. Those "fake miniatures" don't look like any true tilt shift image I've ever seen - but they do look somewhat similar to some Lensbaby images I've seen. However some people have fallen into the habit of referring to those as "tilt shift" images, and (occasionally) I try to avoid getting into pedantic arguments. Unfortunately (for this discussion) in the past when this topic has come up here, pretty much everyone has been Photoshopping their images to get the effect. So until someone actually posts one of these images and says "I used the Nikkor/Canon TS xxx to get this photo", it's going to be moot.

    I'll offer up one solution, though. If forum members wish to donate $1700 to me, I'd be happy to resolve this by testing the Nikkor 24mm f/3.5 PC-E lens extensively. :D
     
  8. ManhattanPrjct macrumors 6502

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    Oct 6, 2008
    #8
    I'm not sure what your style of photography is, but even if somebody gave me that lens for free, I am not sure I could find a use for it every day.

    PC lenses are very cool, and I am always more interested in putting together a photo at the point I press the shutter release (instead of in PS). I look at images like this and this and acknowledge the coolness factor, but I just feel like these are very deliberate. I am not sure I could look at either scene and say "I wish I had my PCE."
     
  9. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

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    #9
    First - thank you for linking to those images. That's really the first time I've seen honest-to-goodness TS lenses being used to get that effect.

    I agree these are specialized lenses, plus if that was all they did I know I'd get tired of that particular sort of shot VERY quickly. I suspect the current popularity of those shots came about because of some Cartoon Network bumps that use that technique. I'm not a big fan of those, but occasionally I see some that are quite appealing.

    If/When I get a TS lens, though, that's not really what I'm interested in. I don't know if you looked at the images I linked to earlier in the thread; but what I like are the focal plane manipulations that TS can do (pretty similar to what people are now trying to come close accomplish with techniques like focus stacking), and also some of the pano opportunities TS lenses provide.
     

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