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Back in 2015, Tim Cook threw his weight behind a water-efficient shower head called Nebia, which sprays in a way that uses less water, but still keeps people warm. It doesn't have an Apple logo on it, but looks like something the company would design - if it made bathroom hardware.

nebia-by-moen-shower-head.jpg

Today, Nebia unveiled a new version of its shower system, and some of the interesting backstory behind Cook's arguably left-field investment choice has also come to light.

According to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman, the Apple chief reportedly made his decision off the back of first-hand experience with the product, after he serendipitously stepped under a prototype at his local gym in Palo Alto, California.

Philip Winter, who helped create the Nebia, told Gurman he managed to persuade fitness centers in Silicon Valley to run pilot tests of the eco-shower, and after installing the prototypes he would wait outside locker rooms to get feedback. That's when he met Cook.
Cook was drawn to the environmental aspect, according to Winter, who asked the Apple boss if he'd be willing to make an investment. Despite the first prototype being "crude," the Apple CEO was excited about the product because there hadn't been much recent innovation in the shower market. He also appreciated the design, Winter said.
Cook subsequently backed Nebia and also went on to contribute in later financing rounds. The startup has raised almost $8 million in total, according to Crunchbase.

Winter said Cook had invested a "significant" amount of his own money in the eco-shower head and advised Nebia on suppliers. He also pushed the startup to prioritize user experience, design and sustainability. According to Winter, Cook's input came in a series of emails that were "very long, well crafted and detailed."

The new Nebia, launching today on Kickstarter, is a smaller and less expensive version of the one Cook originally tested first-hand, but it's the result of a two-year partnership with faucet maker Moen that the Apple boss supported. The Nebia by Moen starts at $160 on Kickstarter, and will eventually be available for $199, down from $499.

Article Link: Tim Cook Invested in Nebia Shower Head After Stepping Under a Prototype in His Local Gym
 
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D.T.

macrumors G4
Sep 15, 2011
11,050
12,455
Vilano Beach, FL
I love a good shower, I mean, a well designed one, with good water delivery/pressure, the right kind of lighting (warm, dimmable), space, open shelfs for a beverage (shower cocktails, woo!). A couple of hotels we've been to, I'm like, "I am moving into this shower, they'll have to drag me out ..."


Gotta admit there’s some balls involved in waiting for people outside the shower to ask if they enjoyed it.

"Why do you think I was in there for 20 minutes ...?"

*wink*
 

theluggage

macrumors 603
Jul 29, 2011
6,322
5,721
The Nebia by Moen starts at $160 on Kickstarter, and will eventually be available for $199, down from $499.

That's certainly progress and I don't want to be too negative - but the next step is to get it down to $50 or so, so that it gets fitted to 90% of showers rather than just (being optimistic) 10% of hipster wet-rooms.

(I'm sure that you can pay way more than $200 for a fancy shower head that doesn't save water, but they're going to be outsold 10:1 by cheaper ones).

Innovation is good, but if you claim to be saving the planet then it needs to be driven by sensible priorities: a cheap shower head that saves 10% of the water and could be simply screwed on to your existing hose would likely be better for the environment than an expensive one that saves 50%.

NB: a $200 shower-head might pay for itself in water bills (at least in the Californias of this world) but it is important to remember that the "total cost of ownership" concept is a luxury only enjoyed by those with plenty of capital. (Documented by Terry Pratchett as the "Sam Vimes 'Boots' theory of socioeconomic unfairness" - google it)
 

thebeans

macrumors 6502a
Feb 9, 2009
505
595



Back in 2015, Tim Cook threw his weight behind a water-efficient shower head called Nebia, which sprays in a way that uses less water, but still keeps people warm. It doesn't have an Apple logo on it, but looks like something the company would design - if it made bathroom hardware.

nebia-by-moen-shower-head.jpg

Today, Nebia unveiled a new version of its shower system, and some of the interesting backstory behind Cook's arguably left-field investment choice has also come to light.

According to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman, the Apple chief reportedly made his decision off the back of first-hand experience with the product, after he serendipitously stepped under a prototype at his local gym in Palo Alto, California.

Philip Winter, who helped create the Nebia, told Gurman he managed to persuade fitness centers in Silicon Valley to run pilot tests of the eco-shower, and after installing the prototypes he would wait outside locker rooms to get feedback. That's when he met Cook.
Cook subsequently backed Nebia and also went on to contribute in later financing rounds. The startup has raised almost $8 million in total, according to Crunchbase.

Winter said Cook had invested a "significant" amount of his own money in the eco-shower head and advised Nebia on suppliers. He also pushed the startup to prioritize user experience, design and sustainability. According to Winter, Cook's input came in a series of emails that were "very long, well crafted and detailed."

The new Nebia, launching today on Kickstarter, is a smaller and less expensive version of the one Cook originally tested first-hand, but it's the result of a two-year partnership with faucet maker Moen that the Apple boss supported. The Nebia by Moen starts at $160 on Kickstarter, and will eventually be available for $199, down from $499.

Article Link: Tim Cook Invested in Nebia Shower Head After Stepping Under a Prototype in His Local Gym
$499. Hahahahahahahahahaha. A fool and his money....
 

oneMadRssn

macrumors 603
Sep 8, 2011
5,754
13,370

Everyone should check out High Sierra Showerheads. Low flow but drenching high pressure. Made in the USA, fully metal, will not ever clog. Small mom and pop company. Very affordable too.

EDIT: To clarify, I have no stake in the company. I was just really blown away by how good they are and hope they succeed in business.
 
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koa

macrumors 6502
Jan 8, 2005
407
219
Hawaii
I don’t think the design is anything special. Looks like lots of plastic. Don’t like the vinyl hoses. Looks bulky. Technology-wise maybe balances out the poor aesthetics.

I've installed many Grohe Retro Shower Systems for myself and friends. The valve allows to switch between, handheld, rainwater, or both and has eco mode for each. Very solid, bar can be used as grab bar. Must be attached with screws through tile. Mostly chrome plated heavy brass with some plastic. Be interesting how Grohe's eco setting compares. Less than $300 when on sale on Amazon.

 

Weaselboy

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 23, 2005
32,649
12,555
California

Everyone should check out High Sierra Showerheads. Low flow but drenching high pressure. Made in the USA, fully metal, will not ever clog. Small mom and pop company. Very affordable too.
That looks interesting. I struggle with hard water clogging any shower head I buy. Does this thing have something other than the usual pinholes to spray the water? It almost looks like some sort of venturi on there dispersing the water.
 

BrentD

macrumors 6502
Jun 25, 2010
292
205
Innovation is good, but if you claim to be saving the planet then it needs to be driven by sensible priorities: a cheap shower head that saves 10% of the water and could be simply screwed on to your existing hose would likely be better for the environment than an expensive one that saves 50%.

This. Unless you're doing new construction or a complete reno, a replacement showerhead that requires a complete rework of your shower is a non starter for most folks. They at least need a version that screws onto the existing showerhead pipe.
 
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D.T.

macrumors G4
Sep 15, 2011
11,050
12,455
Vilano Beach, FL
$499. Hahahahahahahahahaha. A fool and his money....

Well, that was some previous product, this is $199, or $269 with the extra wand (final retail prices, though still not cheap).



Everyone should check out High Sierra Showerheads. Low flow but drenching high pressure. Made in the USA, fully metal, will not ever clog. Small mom and pop company. Very affordable too.

Just took a look, holy smokes, thanks, definitely buying for our next replacement - given the features, flow, construction, these seem like a steal (most models are $60-80).
 

PC_tech

Suspended
Jan 17, 2019
933
914
This. Unless you're doing new construction or a complete reno, a replacement showerhead that requires a complete rework of your shower is a non starter for most folks. They at least need a version that screws onto the existing showerhead pipe.
Did you even look at this? There is nothing to indicate it requires a complete rework. In fact it says the opposite.
 

Baumi

macrumors regular
Mar 31, 2005
241
340
The startup has raised almost $8 million in total, according to Crunchbase.

I mean, this might well end up being a useful product – but why do you need to raise $8 million in capital to design a shower head? Especially when you're partnering with a big and experienced company (Moen) that'll likely take care of a lot of the mundane details of manufacturing and distributing the product?

Several hundred thousand I could understand. But eight million?
 
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Analog Kid

macrumors 604
Mar 4, 2003
6,897
6,840

Everyone should check out High Sierra Showerheads. Low flow but drenching high pressure. Made in the USA, fully metal, will not ever clog. Small mom and pop company. Very affordable too.
Shower modeling must be a weird gig...
 
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