Time Capsule

medavidcook

macrumors member
Original poster
Feb 16, 2013
39
0
Cardiff, Wales
Can you use time capsule to back up a iMac and MBA so have to folders with the back up of each machine in there respective folder?
 

ColdCase

macrumors 68030
Feb 10, 2008
2,960
142
NH
Time machine sets up separate folders for each computer, with the computer name in the folder title.
 

marzer

macrumors 65816
Nov 14, 2009
1,329
44
Colorado
Can you use time capsule to back up a iMac and MBA so have to folders with the back up of each machine in there respective folder?
Yes. The Time Capsule will permit backups from multiple machines. Because it does it over a network, each machine's backup data is contained in own sparse-bundle image on the time capsule's hard drive.
 

Altemose

macrumors G3
Mar 26, 2013
9,089
444
Elkton, Maryland
Time machine sets up separate folders for each computer, with the computer name in the folder title.
Actually it creates a Sparse Disk Image Bundle. Essentially, everything is contained within the one file and allows for multiple Macs to backup each with separate files.
 

flynz4

macrumors 68040
Aug 9, 2009
3,125
35
Portland, OR
Actually it creates a Sparse Disk Image Bundle. Essentially, everything is contained within the one file and allows for multiple Macs to backup each with separate files.
I believe that these sparsebundles are actually packages... not one large file. If you right click and select "show package contents"... you can navigate into the sparsebundle and see all the individual files.

Look but don't touch.

/Jim
 

marzer

macrumors 65816
Nov 14, 2009
1,329
44
Colorado
I believe that these sparsebundles are actually packages... not one large file. If you right click and select "show package contents"... you can navigate into the sparsebundle and see all the individual files.

Look but don't touch.

/Jim
Technically a sparse bundle file is a disk image. You can mount it and view the files stored on the disk image. "Show package contents" lets you view the file bands that make up the disk image itself.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparse_image