Timeline of Retina Displays

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by skaertus, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. skaertus, Feb 12, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013

    skaertus macrumors 68030

    skaertus

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Location:
    Brazil
    #1
    I’ve compiled here all news I found of screens for mobile devices with resolutions superior to 1920x1080/1920x1200. The result is shown below and I hope you find it useful, or at least interesting. I would appreciate if you could tell me whether I forgot to add anything or if any of the information is not correct. I ignored pure speculative rumors, as they would not add much and they are too many.

    It seems that retina-like displays are becoming more and more popular, and soon several devices, including Windows laptops, Android tablets, and the rest of Apple’s mobile line, will feature such screens. The MacBook Pro will not be alone in this market of retina laptops for long.

    Do you think these screens will catch up in 2013? Will Windows laptops be released with such displays? We already have Android tablets with resolutions superior to 1920x1080, but no Windows laptop so far. Why so? If the problem is battery life, how can the MacBook Pro have a good battery life and a retina display, and Windows laptops cannot?

    And when will the MacBook Air and the iPad mini with retina displays will be released?

    • July 2, 2002. NEC unveiled a new Versa Pro laptop series, for the Japanese market only. The Versa Pro VA20S/AE had a 15-inch screen with a resolution of up to 2048x1536 (QXGA). The panel was probably the IAQX10N. The laptop shipped in October and its price was about US$ 3,700.

    • March 9, 2003. NEC introduced the desktop replacement laptop Versa P700, featuring a 15-inch screen with a resolution of 2048x1536 (QXGA).

    • June 24, 2003. NEC announced the Versa Pro VA30S/AE, the follow-up to its previous high-resolution laptop, with a 15-inch screen with a 2048x1536 resolution. It sold for about US$ 3,750 for the Japanese market.

    • October 6, 2003. IBM released a new line of ThinkPads. The ThinkPad R50p, available in November, had a 15-inch screen with a resolution up to 2048x1536 as an option. Such screens were later successfully transplanted to other ThinkPad models, such as the T42p, the T43p and the T60p by enthusiast users, as a custom configuration. However, as the high resolution was an option, ThinkPads with such screens are rare, even though they are believed to be much more popular than the NEC Versa laptops.

    • April 11, 2005. NEC announced the LaVie G Series with a 15-inch display capable of a resolution of 2048x1536. The product was released only in Japan.

    • June 7, 2010: Apple announces the iPhone 4, introducing the term "retina" to market the high display resolution (960x480) on a 3.5-inch screen, stating that the human eye could not perceive individual pixels due to the pixel density of 326 ppi. It was the first of several smartphones that would be released with a very high pixel density. The term "retina" would be later used by Apple to market tablets and laptops featuring screens with high pixel densities.

    • July 20, 2011. Apple releases Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, with an HiDPI mode, a feature that would enable resolution independence on Macs, allowing objects on the screen to be not so small on ultra-high resolution displays. The HiDPI mode hinted at the future release of Macs with a retina display.

    • October 21, 2011. Toshiba showed a 6.1-inch display capable of a 2560x1600 resolution.

    • March 16, 2012. Apple releases the 3rd generation iPad, featuring an IPS 9.7-inch display with a resolution of 2048x1536, marketed as “retina”, although it had a pixel density of 264 ppi, lower than the iPhone 4. The cheapest model costs US$ 499. It was the highest resolution display on any mobile device at the time of its release. The use of retina displays on the 3rd generation iPad had been rumored for months before its release. The 4th generation iPad, featuring an identical display, was released only a few months later, on October 23, 2012.

    • April 4, 2012. Sharp announced that it had begun producing high-resolution displays with its breakthrough IGZO technology. IGZO technology is said to save battery life, which would be useful for the mass production of ultra-high resolution displays suitable for laptops, tablets, smartphones and other mobile devices.

    • April 11, 2012. Intel Vice-President revealed, during the Developer Forum in Beijing, that the then-upcoming Ivy Bridge processors would support “retina-like” displays. According to Intel, tablets with 2560x1440 resolutions and ultrabooks with 2560x1440 and 2800x1800 resolutions would become popular from 2013 onwards.

    • June 11, 2012. Following months of rumors and speculations, Apple introduced, during the WWDC 2012, and along updates of its other laptops, the 15-inch MacBook Pro with a retina display, a redesigned model of its premium laptop, featuring a slimmer and lighter body and an IPS screen with a resolution of 2880x1800 (and a pixel density of 220 ppi), the highest ever seen on laptops so far, for US$ 2,199 (the base model) and US$ 2,799 (the higher end model). The 15-inch MacBook Pro with a retina display would remain as the highest-resolution laptop in the market for over a year following its release, and marketed by Apple as "the world's highest resolution notebook".

    • July 25, 2012. Apple releases OS X 10.8 Moutain Lion, with better support for Macs with retina displays.

    • August 1, 2012. Windows 8 was released to manufacturing. It would become generally available to the public on October 26. Microsoft added to Windows 8 features for better supporting high-resolution screens on mobile devices.

    • August 31, 2012. Samsung showcased a prototype of a Series 9 laptop at IFA Berlin with a 13-inch IPS display with a resolution of 2560x1440. No information on the release date or pricing were revealed.

    • October 2, 2012. Sharp showed 6.1-inch IGZO displays with 2560x1600 resolutions.

    • October 20, 2012. Japan Display, a joint venture among Sony, Hitachi and Toshiba, announces it has developed a 7-inch tablet screen with a resolution of 2560x1600 and which consumes 40% less battery due to WhiteMagic technology.

    • October 23, 2012. Apple released the 13-inch MacBook Pro with a retina display, a redesigned model following the 15-inch unveiled a few months earlier, also with a slimmer and lighter body than the previous version, and featuring an IPS screen with a resolution of 2560x1600 (and a pixel density of 227 ppi), for US$ 1,699 (the base model) and US$ 1,999 (the higher end model). At the same date, Apple also released the 4th generation iPad with a retina display, with the same screen resolution, and at the same price points, but a faster processor than the 3rd generation model.

    • October 29, 2012. Google announced the Nexus 10 tablet, with a 10.1-inch screen with a resolution of 2560x1600, the highest so far on tablets (and surpassing the resolution of the retina iPad). The Nexus 10 became available in November 13, for US$ 399 (the base model). The screen, developed by Samsung, was showcased by the company in 2011. Linus Torvalds complains, on a blog post, that Windows PCs should have similar resolutions.

    • December 21, 2012. Archos releases 97 Titanium HD, a tablet running Android with a 9.7-inch display with a 2048x1536 resolution.

    • January 8, 2013. At CES, Panasonic showed a prototype of a 20-inch and heavy tablet with runs Windows 8 at a resolution of 3840x2560 (and a pixel density of 230 ppi).

    • January 9, 2013. LG showed a 12.9-inch panel with a 2560x1700 resolution at CES which is supposed to equip laptops in 2013.

    • January 11, 2013. Acer showed a 15.6-inch IPS panel capable of a resolution of 2880x1620. laptop at CES. The panel is supposed to equip laptops (including an ultrabook) to be released in Spring.

    • January 29, 2013. Apple announced the release of a 128 GB version of the 4th gen iPad with retina display, with the other characteristics, including the screen, remaining unchanged.

    • February 13, 2013: Apple updated the processors of the higher-end 13-inch and of both 15-inch retina MacBook Pro models to feature a slightly higher clock speed. It also dropped the prices of the 13-inch models to US$ 1,499 (the base model) and US$ 1,699 (the higher end model), while the prices of the 15-inch models remained unchanged.

    • February 21, 2013: Google introduced the Chromebook Pixel, a laptop running ChromeOS and featuring a 12.85-inch display with touch-screen technology and a resolution of 2560x1700, with a 3:2 aspect ratio. Google announced it as having the highest pixel density of any laptop in the market so far, 239 ppi. The new laptop sold for US$ 1,299 (with Wi-Fi) and US$ 1,449 (with LTE). The announcement appeared a few days after the leak of a video revealing the laptop.

    • April 17, 2013. Toshiba unveils the KIRAbook, an ultrabook with a 13.3-inch display featuring a resolution of 2560x1440 (221 ppi). It is the first Windows laptop to be sold with a retina-like resolution. The premium laptop was announced in three versions, two of them featuring touch-screens, which were priced from US$ 1,599 to US$ 1,999.

    • May 14, 2013. The ASUS Zenbook UX51VZ-DB114H, with a 15.6-inch display and a 2880x1620 resolution, is spotted at the website of Amazon Germany. Prices range from 1699 to 1999 euro. The model is listed as having been available since April 19.

    • May 14, 2013. Sharp announces that it will begin production of high pixel density IGZO panels for laptops in June 2013. The panels will come in three sizes: 11.6-inch at 2560x1440 (253 ppi), 14-inch at 3200x1800 (262 ppi) and 15.6-inch (235 ppi).

    • May 20, 2013. Samsung announces that it will showcase several display prototypes, including a 10.1-inch with a resolution of 2560x1600 (298 ppi) for tablets and a 13.3-inch with a resolution of 3200x1800 (276 ppi) for notebooks.

    • May 22, 2013. Qualcomm demonstrates a 5.1-inch Mirasol display with a resolution of 2560x1440, at an impressive pixel density of 577 ppi.

    • May 22, 2013. HP announces redesigned lines of Envy and Pavillon laptops, including a 14-inch Envy TouchSmart ultrabook that can be optionally upgraded to a screen resolution of 3200x1800. The laptop is expected to be available in the Summer.

    • June 2, 2013. Acer announces, during Computex in Taipei, an updated Aspire S7 laptop with a Haswell ULV processor and a 13.3-inch multitouch display which may be configured to feature a 2560x1440 resolution.

    • June 3, 2013. Intel shows off a tablet prototype with a 10.1-inch screen capable of a 2560x1440 resolution to showcase its Bay Trail-T platform.

    • June 3, 2013. Asus showcases the Zenbook Infinity at Computex, an ultrabook with Gorilla Glass lid, featuring a Haswell processor, and a 13.3-inch display with a 2560x1440 resolution ("Infinity", in fact, would be the codename of the new Zenbook model which would launch later in the year). The company also unveils the Transformer Pad Infinity, an Android tablet with an NVIDIA Tegra chip and a 10.1-inch display with a 2560x1440 resolution.

    • June 3, 2013. Dell showcases the prototype of the XPS 11 at Computex, a 2.5 pounds convertible ultrabook with a Haswell ULV processor and an 11-inch IPS display with a 2560x1440 resolution.

    • June 3, 2013. Toshiba reveals two Android tablets, the Excite Pro and the Excite Write, both featuring Tegra 4 processors and 10.1-inch displays capable of a 2560x1600 resolution.

    • June 4, 2013. MSI unveiled the GT60 3K Edition, a gaming laptop featuring a 15.6-inch screen with a 2880x1620 resolution (213 ppi). The powerful laptop, which also comes with a Core i7-4930MX processor and a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780M graphics card, will be available later in the year.

    • June 5, 2013. Fujitsu announces the Lifebook UH90 at Computex, a 0.61-inch ultrabook with a red finish and a 14-inch IGZO display capable of a 3200x1800 resolution. The laptop is set to be available in Japan on June 28, and a US release was not mentioned.

    • June 5, 2013. Sharp showcases a 14-inch and a 15.6-inch IGZO displays at Computex, both with resolutions of 3200x1800.

    • June 20, 2013. Samsung holds a Galaxy and ATIV premiere event in London, showcasing, among other models, the ATIV Q, a hybrid running both Windows 8 and Android, and the ATIV Book 9 Plus (similar to the Series 9, but rebranded with another name), a high-end Haswell laptop running Windows. Both machines feature a 13.3-inch screen with a 3200x1800 resolution (275 ppi). Both models are expected to sell for US$ 1,499.

    • July 13, 2013. Benchmarks on Acer TA272HUL tablet surfaces. The unannounced tablet features a Tegra 4 chip and a screen with a 2560x1440 resolution.

    • July 18, 2013. Dell confirms the release of Precision M3800 laptop. According to some leaks, its 15.6-inch screen would have the option to feature a resolution of 3200x1800. Dell would later confirm this specific information.

    • August 9, 2013. Samsung reveals that the ATIV Book 9 Plus will go on pre-order on August 18, and that prices will start at US$ 1,399.99. The laptop features a screen resolution of 3200x1800, a battery life of 7.5 hours, and a 0.54-inch thick aluminum body.

    • August 16, 2013. Leaked benchmarks show an unannounced Amazon Kindle Fire model with an 8.9-inch display capable of a 2560x1600 resolution.

    • August 20, 2013. LG unveils what it claims to be the world's first quad HD smartphone display, a 5.5-inch panel with a 2560x1440 resolution, sporting the highest pixel density in a mobile device to date (538 ppi).

    • September 4, 2013. Samsung announces the Galaxy Note 10.1 2014 edition, an upgraded version of its tablet, with an 8-core processor running at 1.9 Ghz, 3 GB RAM and a 10.1-inch display with a resolution of 2560x1600.

    • September 4, 2013. Asus announces, during IFA, the Transformer Pad TF701T, with a 2560x1600 10.1-inch IPS display, powered by an NVIDIA Tegra 4 processor.

    • September 5, 2013. Asus releases the Zenbook UX301 (which was codenamed "Infinity" in a previous appearance) at IFA. The Asus 3rd generation ultrabook features a Haswell processor and a 13.3-inch screen with a 2560x1440 resolution. Asus also released the similar UX302 and a new version of the Transformer Book, but none with such a high resolution. Price and availability of the UX301 were not confirmed.

    • September 5, 2013. Panasonic shows its Toughpad 4K UT-MB5 at IFA. The tablet, which had been previously shown as a prototype at CES, features a 20-inch screen with a 3840x2560 resolution (230 ppi; the resolution is higher than quad-full HD), a 1.9 GHz Intel Core i5 processor, up to 8 GB RAM and a 256 GB SSD. The tablet, which weighs 2.35kg and is designed with sales, marketing and media professionals in mind, has a price tag of 4,500 euro (about US$ 5,900) when it goes on sale on the first half of 2014.

    • September 5, 2013. Lenovo announces, among other models with lower resolutions, the convertible ultrabook Yoga 2 Pro at IFA, featuring a Haswell processor and a 13.3-inch screen with 350 nits and a 3200x1800 resolution (282 ppi). The laptop is thinner and lighter than the original Yoga, and is expected to deliver a 9-hour battery life. The Yoga PRo 2 is set to become available in October, and sell for US$ 1,099.

    • September 5, 2013. Sony showcased the Vaio Flip convertible ultrabooks at IFA. The laptops, which feature 13, 14 or 15-inch screens, make use of a magnetic device to turn it into a tablet. Although the standard resolution is 1920x1080, the 15-inch version has an option to be upgraded to 2880x1620.

    • September 5, 2013. LG introduces the Z935 ultrabook at IFA. The laptop features a 13.3-inch 2560x1440 IPS display, an Intel Haswell CPU, 8 GB RAM and up to 256 GB SSD storage, at only 2.5 lbs. The ultrabook is expected to go on sale in November in Korea for about $1,000.

    • September 9, 2013. Dell announces Precision workstations with high resolution IGZO displays. The Precision M4800, to launch in September, features a 15.6-inch display with a 400-nit 3200x1800 resolution (235 ppi), and begins at US$ 1,249. It is set to be followed by the Precision M3800 later in the year.

    • September 10, 2013. HP announces a new line of laptops, including the ZBook 15, a 15-inch laptop which will include, as an option, a display capable of a 3200x1800 resolution (244 ppi).

    • September 11, 2013. Lenovo announces a new line of ThinkPad laptops, including the ThinkPad W540, so called "Lenovo's most powerful workstation ever" and "the thinnest and lightest mobile workstation in its class", powered by an Intel Core i7 processor, a dedicated NVIDIA Quadro video card, up to 32 GB RAM and a 15.5-inch IPS display with a 2880x1620 resolution.

    • September 25, 2013. Amazon officially launches a new line of the Kindle Fire tablets, thinner and lighter than the previous models. The 8.9-inch Kindle Fire HDX sports a 2560x1600 resolution (339 ppi), a 2.2 GHz quad-core Snapdragon processor and 2 GB of RAM. Prices start at US$ 379 for the model equipped with 16 GB storage (32 and 64 GB are also available).

    • September 30, 2013. Sharp announces the Mebius Pad, a tablet with a 10-inch IGZO display with a 2560x1600 resolution which is set to be released in Japan in early 2014.

    • October 2, 2013. Dell announced new laptop and tablet models. The XPS range is updated to get the new Intel Haswell processors. Among the new models, there is an updated XPS 15 with a 15.6-inch IGZO display capable of a 3200x1800 resolution, which sells from US$ 1,499. Dell also released the new XPS 11, a 2.5 lbs light laptop convertible with a 11.6-inch IGZO 400-nit display with a 2560x1440 resolution, which had been previously announced, and sells from US$ 999. The other models did not get such a high screen resolution. Due to the use of IGZO technology, battery life of the high-resolution models is expected to be much improved.

    • October 8, 2013. Fujitsu introduces a new line of laptops and tablets, including some with a high-resolution option, featuring the new Intel Haswell processor. The Lifebook U904, called the "world's thinnest 14-inch ultrabook", at 15.5mm, with a 14-inch IGZO display capable of a 3200x1800 resolution. The Lifebook S904 is an ultrabook featuring a 13.3-inch display with a 2560x1440 resolution. The tablet U904 also has a 13.3-inch IGZO display with a 2560x1440 resolution. The models will be available between November 2013 and January 2014.

    • October 15, 2013. NEC announced the new LaVie Z, to hit the Japanese stores in November. The laptop, which is the lightest ultrabook in the world, at 795g, features a Haswell Intel Core i7-4500U processor at 1.8 GHz, a 13.3-inch IGZO display with a 2560x1440 resolution, and an announced battery life of more than 9 hours.

    • October 16, 2013. Vivo XPlay 3S Android smartphone is launched in the Chinese market, with a 2560x1440 resolution.

    • October 22, 2013. Apple releases the updated versions of both the 13-inch and the 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display featuring Haswell processors. The 13-inch MacBook Pro is also slightly thinner and lighter. Prices for the 13-inch version now start at US$ 1,299, and for the 15-inch, US$ 1,999. Apple also presented the all-new iPad Air, featuring the same retina display as the 4th generation iPad, but in a thinner body that resembles the iPad Mini. The iPad Mini was also updated and got a 2048x1536 retina display, with a higher pixel density than the iPad Air. The iPad Mini with Retina Display will sell for US$ 399 and up; and the iPad Air, for US$ 499.

    • October 23, 2013. Details of the Lenovo ThinkPad X3 leaked online. According to the leaks, the 14-inch ultrabook, the successor to the ThinkPad X1, will weigh only 1.27 kg and will get a Haswell processor and an optional 2560x1440 IPS display.

    • October 24, 2013. Japan Display showcases a 5.4-inch and a 6.2-inch display, both with a 2560x1440 resolution, aimed at smartphones. The 5.4-inch display sports an impressive pixel density of 543 ppi, while the 6.2-inch hás 473 ppi.
     
  2. tillsbury macrumors 65816

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    #2
    Interesting summary, I didn't realise that such high resolutions had been done so early (even if they were Japan-only).

    I'm waiting now for a retina cinema display. I've been running 2560x1600 on an external monitor for many years and that was the minimum external requirement for this laptop (which is one of the reasons I went MBPr instead of a Windows laptop, many of which won't go that high). DP video is a must. But it would be absolutely fantastic to see this resolution jump dramatically on the desktop, to 4kx3k or that kind of territory. I would buy it in a shot if that turned up, as long as it was driveable through Thunderbolt somehow. I'm not expecting it this year, but maybe in the next year or two...
     
  3. walkie, Feb 12, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013

    walkie macrumors 6502

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    #3
    Laptop makers were selling the same junk for long, now Apple has shown them the way to go...
     
  4. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #4
    Yes I mean it could have been possible around 2002/2003 by the looks of it - but thankfully Apple tends to release products "for the masses", and that's why they often do so well.. I believe the rMBP is selling quite well in this regard, much like the riOS counterparts.
     
  5. Freyqq macrumors 68040

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    #5
    It isn't enough to just stick a high-res screen on a laptop. The scaling software also has to be good, and the GPU/CPU have to have the power to handle it well.
     
  6. walkie, Feb 13, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2013

    walkie macrumors 6502

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    #6
    Yes I always knew the HD were the culprit for lag on computers not the CPU, the PC makers were selling us the same crap year after year with a new stunning and faster CPU! but with the same stupid boring screen and crappy laggy HD.

    PC makers launched Netbooks, being a huge flop, Apple said "People don't want the same stupid tiny PC with HDs!" People want Tablet PC with a fast flash storage and tactile interface!!!, Apple launched iPad being a huge success!.

    PC makers launched UltraBooks based on the Apple MacBook Air design, Apple said "People don't want the same boring Windows based junk with the same boring screen!", Apple launched retina MacBook Pro being a success.

    Same story with the iPod, iPhone...

    ----------

    Yes but it always takes the software time to be on par with hardware, Apple rMBPs are really hardware capable to handle the screen but the software needs time to catch up.
     
  7. DoFoT9 macrumors P6

    DoFoT9

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    #7
    Hey yeh, you're right - this is why I've always chosen to follow with Apple products since day dot. Maybe they're not THE best in their market, some Android phones are really really nice these days, but for reliability in all areas I can trust them.
     
  8. Mac32 macrumors 6502a

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    #8
    Exactly, it's only recently that laptops have been given the necessary gpu power for this. The iGPU in Haswell (and later Broadwell) should further mature the retina technology for laptops/notebooks.
     
  9. skaertus thread starter macrumors 68030

    skaertus

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    #9
    In fact, the first netbooks from Asus came with flash memory, and several after them, so your statement has no factual support. Netbooks were not a flop, they were a success. However, they were superseded by cheap laptops which matched their prices and also by Apple's iPad.

    As for the retina MacBook Pro being a success, there is no sales report on how it is performing. In fact, Apple has just dropped the price of the 13-inch retina models (as of today), which may have been caused by slow sales of this particular model.
     
  10. walkie macrumors 6502

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    #10
    Apple weren't the first ones selling computers with SSD but they popularized them, they didn't invent tablets but they made a mainstream device. Maybe Netbooks sold well at the beginning but they completely dissapeared when tablet PCs showed up, it made more sense having a tablet than a tiny underpowered PC.

    The MacBook Retina is a breakthrough among laptops when you look at all the engineering behind it, but Apple messed it up with the crappy Mountain Lion, I hope they release a decent version in no time. The 13-inch is an overpriced PC most people prefer the 15-inch version.
     
  11. robvas macrumors 68020

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    #11
    Dell had some killer high-res laptops back 10 years ago. I had Dell laptops with 1600x1200 and 1400x1050 resolutions, they were killer. It's just the last 5 years where everyone (including Apple, look at the 13" Pro) was stuck on 1280x800 and now 1366x768.

    Software is the key - I never had performance issues with my high-res Dell laptops but Windows and Linux scaling wasn't very good, and (speaking of Windows 7) is better but not anywhere near how nice it is on OS X.

    Netbooks sold very well - problem is PC makers don't get any profit from them.
     
  12. walkie macrumors 6502

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    #12

    Yes as you have said the problem was the proper scaling, the retina concept didn't exist by the time, only ClearType/Anti-aliasing and the like existed to make things look better on a low resolution monitor, I think Apple got it right.
     
  13. skaertus thread starter macrumors 68030

    skaertus

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    #13
    Don't forget that IBM had ThinkPads running at 2048x1536 resolution in 2004. After the acquisition of ThinkPad line by Lenovo, however, we have never seen another one with such a resolution. Lenovo is still stuck with low-resolution models, and 1600x900 seems like a high resolution for ThinkPad these days. It makes me wonder whether IBM would have pushed those ultra-high resolutions during the 2000s, much before Apple or anybody else, if it had not sold the ThinkPad brand and exited the personal computers business.

    ----------

    Actually, I am not sure if the netbooks disappeared due to the iPad or due to the appearance of cheap laptops. If you look at Amazon.com, you will find full laptops selling for as low as US$ 399.00. It makes not sense to buy an underpowered netbook when you can buy a laptop - not a powerful one, but certainly something far better than a netbook - for a similar price.

    Netbooks sold well for some time, and they should have made some profit. But they declined, and I wouldn't be able to tell the reasons for such a decline. The iPad and cheaper laptops must have played a big part on this, though.

    The retina MacBook Pro indeed seems to be a great machine. The sheer fact that there is no other laptop featuring such high resolution displays should be evidence that they are very well-engineered in fact.

    Apple has just dropped the price of the 13-inch model, which starts now at US$ 1,499. The higher end version now comes with a 2.6 GHz Core i5 processor, and with 256 GB of RAM, for US$ 1,699. It's an aggressive price drop for Apple standards, and now the 13-inch retina MacBook Pro is a serious contender against top-of-line ultrabooks, as it is in the same price range.

    These new prices seem much more reasonable, and I may buy a 13-inch retina MacBook Pro as my next laptop, even if I intend to run Windows 8 on it.
     
  14. robvas macrumors 68020

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    #14
    ML is crappy?
     
  15. skaertus thread starter macrumors 68030

    skaertus

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  16. Ploki macrumors 68000

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    #16
    OS X 11 (Hopefully not iOS X where you will need to jailbreak to access root..) will have no scaling factor. Retina will be 1:1... no more @2x crap.
     
  17. skaertus thread starter macrumors 68030

    skaertus

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    #17
    Well, OS X 10.9 has not even been released yet, but it will come in 2013. If OS X 11 (or OS XI 11 or whatever) is released in 2014, as the follow-up to OS X 10.9 (no rumors on that yet!), it will have support for resolutions lower than retina, since these computers are still being sold by Apple and Apple will not want to drop support for them. In addition, the brand new iMac uses non-retina resolutions, and will keep that for a while (2560x1440 in retina mode would equal to 5120x2880, which is a resolution too high for video cards these days).
     
  18. snaky69 macrumors 603

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    #18
    You're missing the iPhone 4, the first one to actually be dubbed "retina".
     
  19. skaertus thread starter macrumors 68030

    skaertus

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    #19
    Actually, no. It was a deliberate decision to keep the iPhone 4 out of the list. It is a timeline of displays with resolution higher than 1920x1080/1920x1200. The iPhone 4/4S is 960x640, which is high for its size, but not quite there. There are lots of other phones with high resolution displays that came after the iPhone 4, and it would be hard to be in track of all of them. In addition, those displays have already become popular enough, and the purpose of the timeline is partially to understand the evolution and increased likeliness of higher resolution screens to populate tablets and laptops to be released in the future (including the MacBook Air and the iPad).
     
  20. skaertus thread starter macrumors 68030

    skaertus

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    #20
    Just updated the list.

    I would appreciate if you could have anything to add to it. Any news?
     
  21. skaertus thread starter macrumors 68030

    skaertus

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    #21
    I've just updated the list to reflect the launch of Toshiba Kirabook, which was announced today. It is the first Windows laptop to feature a retina-like resolution. Have you seen the news?
     
  22. B... macrumors 68000

    B...

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    #22
    Yes; $100 less for a 1.7 GHz ULV processor and Windows 8. Pass.
     
  23. skaertus thread starter macrumors 68030

    skaertus

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Location:
    Brazil
    #23
    I guess you read wrong... the Kirabook sells for US$ 1,599, which is actually US$ 100 more than the base MacBook Pro.

    I saw no mention of it carrying a standard or ultra-low voltage processor, so I won't assume that it carries one or another (I guess it will be powered by some ULV processor; do you have any concrete news on that?).

    According to The Verge, viewing angles are bad (http://www.theverge.com/2013/4/17/4...abook-takes-on-the-macbook-air-and-pro-all-at), so one may come up with the conclusion that the screen is TN and not IPS (and Toshiba had no word on that too).

    I saw no specific information on battery life too, although Toshiba claims it can handle a whole day of work. Let's see.

    Still, the laptop has its qualities: there is a touch-screen version, and it weighs even less than the MacBook Air. It's impressive, especially considering that this is the first Windows laptop to feature such a resolution.

    On a side note: if this laptop, weighing even less than the Air, delivers some reasonable battery life like Toshiba claims, then Apple would have no technical reason for not releasing a retina MacBook Air following the release of Haswell.
     
  24. B... macrumors 68000

    B...

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    #24
    No, I read right. $1599 for 256 GB SSD vs $1699 for 256 GB SSD.

    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1571782

    http://www.theverge.com/2013/4/17/4...resolution-ultrabook-specs-price-release-date

    "At launch, there will be three versions of the KIRAbook, but we only know the details of the two higher-end models right now. Both will arrive with touchscreens, but different processors. One is powered by an ultra-low-voltage Core i5-3337U processor, while the more expensive model has the higher-end i7-3537U ultra-low-voltage CPU."
     
  25. skaertus thread starter macrumors 68030

    skaertus

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Location:
    Brazil
    #25
    Oh, okay. You're comparing the base Kirabook with the 256 GB version of the retina Pro. So, it's actually US$ 100 less.

    Thanks. I hadn't seen that. So the Kirabook will have ULV processors after all.

    Hey, Apple! What about a retina MacBook Air now?
     

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