Tips on Focus

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by mac 2005, Feb 14, 2008.

  1. mac 2005 macrumors 6502a

    mac 2005

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago
    #1
    How could I have kept both the statuette and flower in the focus? I took this picture with my Nikon D70, stock Nikor lens, automatic setting.

    The bloom was probably 2 inches in front of the statuette.

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  2. .JahJahwarrior. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    #2
    That's called your depth of field. For greater depth of field, use a higher aperture number. This will mean less light getting to the sensor, so you'll have to use a slower shutter speed, a higher ISO or find a way to get more light in there.

    And it's not always possible to get everything you want in focus.
     
  3. TimJim macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    #3
    Find your recommended shutter speed (see what number pops up when you focus in Auto/Progam) then go into manuel, increase the aperture, and lower the shutter speed, and maybe a higher ISO.
     
  4. panoz7 macrumors 6502a

    panoz7

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    #4
    And how far was the camera from the flower? Try backing up some and zooming in instead of shooting up close. The ratio between the cameras distance from the flower and the flower's distance from the statue is just as important in determining depth of field as the aperture.
     
  5. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #5
    Haha, I was going to suggest the opposite.

    Use the shortest focal length you have (say 18 mm), set your aperture to f/8 or f/10, and focus to a point between them. I mean, if the distance between the flowers and statue is 2", then focus on the statue, lean backwards 1", and shoot.
     
  6. HomeingPigeon macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2007
    #6
    You would have needed to change your f/stop. That controls your dof (depth of field).
     

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