Too much Camera? 1080p 60fps Panasonic HDC-HS700K

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by thedoor1, Mar 3, 2010.

  1. thedoor1 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2009
    #1
    This is not shipping yet, but it is up for new orders http://www2.panasonic.com/consumer-electronics/shop/Cameras-Camcorders/Camcorders/2010-Camcorders/model.HDC-HS700K_11002_7000000000000005702. I'm basically looking for excellent picture quality, zoom, image stabilization, and future proofing.

    However... 1080p 60fps sounds like the AVCHD file will be unmanageable. Any idea on this? I'm planning on getting the next revision of the iMac whenever available (scared of the bugs in this one) and processing on that. I don't want to spend extra hours on simple processing for a minor upgrade in picture quality. Also I'm not even sure 1080p 60fps is viewable on an iMac. I believe my Plasma is capable of that -- but that takes Blue Ray or a media server anyway.

    Alternative cameras come to mind? Use is only for family videos, but I love high quality. I shoot stills as a hobby with a Nikon D300.
     
  2. justaregularjoe macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    #2
    Well, you are right that 1080p/60fps is going to be a stretch for an iMac, even an taxation on the contstraints of the standard irtself.

    If you are worried about it, why not use a renderbox on the network or build a more powerful hackintosh.
     
  3. puckhead193 macrumors G3

    puckhead193

    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    #3
    what are you using now?
    I think more and more tapes are going to be obsolete and going to some form of tapeless system. AVCHD might pick up as sony released two new pro camera's that use AVCHD...
     
  4. thedoor1 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2009
    #4
    Thanks. A renderbox or a hackintosh breaches my technological complication threshold. Trying to keep it relatively simple.

    I believe this camera is HDD not tape. They offer the same specs with Flash memory only for a little less cash.

    I have a iMac G5 (no chance, even youtube viewing and iPhoto editing is slow) and my wife's Early 08 MBP.

    I do not currently have a camcorder (outside the iPhone and an olympus point-n-shoot w/ video).
     
  5. justaregularjoe macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    #5
    >>Implying that either of these are a camcorder at all :p

    Oh and puckheD193, tape? What Are you talking about tape for?
     
  6. sigamy macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2003
    Location:
    NJ USA
    #6
    The new Panny consumer cams look good. Remember, you don't have to shoot in 1080p/60.

    If you use Final Cut, you can log and transfer into ProRes for editing.

    They other way to step into HD without editing headaches is to go with an HDV cam such as the Canon HV30/HV40. These have 30p and 24p and a fair amount of manual controls. But you are stuck with tapes and real time transfer into your computer. On the plus side, minidv tapes give you an instant backup of your footage.
     
  7. thedoor1 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2009
    #7
    Poorly phrased by me indeed!

    As for tape... Real Time transfer blows. But is it really that much faster to work with? Isn't it on its way out?

    Also looking more at this, new TV's boast 24fps as 'smooth cinema' which I take that to mean is the speed of a movie reel. That would seem to be quite fast enough. may 60fps allows some good slow mo -
     
  8. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Location:
    Cold beer land
    #8
    "too much camera" ... I don't think there is such thing as too much ... :)

    But too little computer with a G5 iMac. I have a Power Mac G5 and it struggles to say the least with 1080p.

    Do you have a Bluray player? with a 1080p HDTV?
    Do you want to edit?

    Also you'll need hard drives for back up and a strategy.
     
  9. thedoor1 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2009
    #9
    Yes the G5 is too little.... is a new i7 plenty? (next edition).

    Tks for the Qs!!

    Personally I have to listen to Mr. S Jobs and believe that Blue-ray will dwindle as clouds, streaming, and higher capacity internet delivery takes over (such as Fios and Google's project). Blue-ray players are cheap so no big deal at this point so I could get one, but it sounds like a hassle to burn Blue-ray from a Mac as there are thousands of posts about it. I may as well just buy a large HDD (and a backup) to store personal video. To show on the TV (when the iMac doesn't suffice) an Apple TV or Mini HTPC set up seems simplest. To share with family I would want to put it on a DVD.



    Yes I have a 1080p TV. My editing would limited to cleaning up, organizing, splicing home video, but I'd probably tinker.
     
  10. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Location:
    Cold beer land
    #10
    Here a question for others.
    With FCE can you edit in something other than full 1080p HD?
    Like edit in SD or 720p, then create full HD based on the edits? not sure if I'm saying this correctly.
    So source is in 1080p60. And create media for iPod (SDish), AppleTV 720p24, H264 on DVD for Bluray player and upto full 1080p60.

    Are there any Bluray players that can do 1080p60?

    I'm sort of in the same boat. I have a miniDV camcorder and would like to upgrade. I have the 1080p HDTV.
    I envision a setup like:
    (need to figure out attachments)
    Is "Manage Attachments" broken?
    Anyway ...

    Bluray -> HDMI ->
    AppleTv -> HDMI -> Receiver/Amp -> HDMI -> 60+" HDTV 1080p
    Satellite DVR -> HDMI ->
    other? -> ? ->
     
  11. Grimace macrumors 68040

    Grimace

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Location:
    with Hamburglar.
    #11
    Are you shooting for something with a shelf life of a few years? In that case, few will need the 60fps.

    3 years down the line? It may be standard. Motion blur is greatly reduced and I'd jump on it myself if I didn't already have my Canon 5D mark II.
     
  12. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Location:
    Cold beer land
    #12
    Shelf life for family video is ... long. I still have 8mm film from growing up.
    I've convert some to miniDV a few years ago.
    It becomes a problem of how best to preserve the content.
     
  13. thedoor1 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2009
    #13
    Shelf life for video.. as long as possible.

    Shelf life for camera.. I'd hope to get 5 years out of a 1300 purchase. Otherwise may as well buy a $500 camera twice.
     
  14. Grimace macrumors 68040

    Grimace

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Location:
    with Hamburglar.
    #14
    There camera itself will certainly be usable for a good long time.

    The bigger issue is how long the content format will last. Buying something that does 60p will be a little more expensive now, but remember 10 years ago when P&S cameras were taking 640x480 videos? Those are harder and harder to see as resolutions on screens get bigger (more dense). 640x480 ain't what it used to be.

    If the video is for memories that you will want to see years and years down the road, get the highest quality content capturing format that you can afford - the camera body itself is almost irrelevant.
     
  15. HighSeasCaptain macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    #15
    This is weird. I've not seen a high framerate camera that wasn't geared for slow motion. Usually 60fps (and higher) plays back at 24fps when you play back the video files and put them on an editing track on most cameras.
     
  16. mobeale macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2010
    #16
    Panasonic 700 editing

    MS offers a simple FREE beta version of their movie software which edits many frame rates.You can reduce the speed of the video to 1/2 to 1/4 and save in WMV mode. I then pick up the file with Corel for any further editing (which presumably reduces frame rate also) and save in whatever format (ex iphone 264). Presumably Final Cut could do this.
    So, if your Mac has windows this may be an option. The program is stable and very easy. It worked the first try. Go to Windows Live to find program. Note: I'm using a Windows Vista/7 machine.
    The camera is amazingly wonderful.
     
  17. handsome pete macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    #17
    A lot of the pro cameras now are providing options to shoot in 60fps, but most people use this footage to slow down later in post for smooth slo-mo.

    That doesn't mean that you can't keep playback at 60fps though.


    However, I still don't see 60fps playback ever becoming the norm. People are still trying to get that 24fps look to match traditional film. I don't think that look is going away any time soon. It's the established cinematic standard.
     
  18. Magrathea macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2008
    #18
    Ha, ha, i7 will do the trick right. I have a new 2011 mac mini and it barely plays 1080p 60. You'll need a min of a quad core me thinks so forget mac mini. 1080p 60 sucks!
     

Share This Page